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  1. #1
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    cant break chain

    I got a chain breaker tool and am trying to take off my chain, I tried pushing a pin out and it works for like half a turn but then gets really tight and I cant turn it anymore. Is it sopposed to get that hard to turn or am I doing something wrong. Its a Shimano chain and it doesnt have a special pin that I could notice.

  2. #2
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kp3509
    I got a chain breaker tool and am trying to take off my chain, I tried pushing a pin out and it works for like half a turn but then gets really tight and I cant turn it anymore. Is it sopposed to get that hard to turn or am I doing something wrong. Its a Shimano chain and it doesnt have a special pin that I could notice.
    It's not uncommon for the first turn or two to be relatively hard, assuming the tool is aligned over the pin. As you push the pin, you are deforming the pin slightly as you initially push it through the link. After the first couple of turns, it gets easier.

    Remember, when reassembling a Shimano chain, you'll need their special replacement pin.

  3. #3
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kp3509
    I got a chain breaker tool and am trying to take off my chain, I tried pushing a pin out and it works for like half a turn but then gets really tight and I cant turn it anymore. Is it sopposed to get that hard to turn or am I doing something wrong. Its a Shimano chain and it doesnt have a special pin that I could notice.
    Yes, it gets very hard to turn! Especially with a shimano chain, I'd say you typically need 10 lb-feet of torque or so. Keep in mind that with a Shimano chain you're supposed to use special replacement pins when you replace it, although I've gotten away with reusing the pin.

    If you want to reuse the pin, *do not* push it all the way out because it will be impossible to get back in. Push it until it is stuck in the outside side plate, then separate the link. With the pin still stuck in the outside side plate, you will be able to press it back in.
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  4. #4
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    Push the pin & the adjacent pin all the way through, then use a Wipperman or SRAM connecter link to put the chain together again. This will give you a chain that is easy to remove for cleaning.

  5. #5
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    What brand of chain tool are you using? The good brands like Park work much better than the <$10.00 cheapies (Ciclo). The cheap ones are harder to get perfectly aligned with the pin. Then they bend or break when you force them.

  6. #6
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vo2min
    What brand of chain tool are you using? The good brands like Park work much better than the <$10.00 cheapies (Ciclo). The cheap ones are harder to get perfectly aligned with the pin. Then they bend or break when you force them.
    I've used a crappy chain tool on a whole lot of chains, many rusted or bent or otherwise recalcitrant... and I've never broken a chain tool.

    It *is* true that the nice fancy Park chain tools hold the chain in place better, but it's not too hard to get the pin lined up with a cheap tool. I think the Park tool is mainly a convenience for busy professional mechanics, since it has a big handle and it lines up with the chain quickly, and you can turn it faster. It's a really nice tool, but if you're not doing 20 chains a day, it's not necessary.
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  7. #7
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    Be sure you keep the chain perpendicular to the tool's punch, don't let the punch run on an angle to the chain pin. It's easy to break the punch, even on an expensive tool, been there, done that.

    Al

  8. #8
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    thanks

    I finnaly got it. I just had to turn harder. The cheap cyclo tool doesnt make it easy. Thanks

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