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Thread: Seat angle

  1. #1
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    Seat angle

    This could be me being very thick but when I set up my saddle on a new ITM Milenium stem I ignored the angle marking and used the heath robinson approach of a book on the saddle and a woodworking spirit level to ensure a very slight upward tilt. This left me with a slightly negative reading against the angle markings on the seat stem so I remeasured constantly to ensure my approach was correct. Over the past year though I am not so sure. I feel as though my weight is being forced too much towards the bars despite the seat being positioned well back on the seat post. I am very comfortable on the drops but on the tops it is a bit too tiring on the shoulders. I have been comparing the position to another bike I have which is more comfortable and the only difference I can find is that I have the seat slightly lower ( 3 to 5 mm ) on the more comfortable bike. I am not sure this is the major difference though and wonder if my approach to measuring the seat angle is just inaccurate and it is by fluke I have got it right on the more comfortable bike. Opinions please.

  2. #2
    ride, paint, ride simplify's Avatar
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    How does the geometry compare, between the two bikes? Is the seat tube angle more relaxed on one than the other? Sometimes a more upright seat tube can make a difference because your legs are further back in relation to your hips, and this can cause your upper body weight to be shifted forward. If your handlebar stem is a bit long, that can exacerbate the problem.

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    Making a kilometer blurry waterrockets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lawkd
    How does the geometry compare, between the two bikes? Is the seat tube angle more relaxed on one than the other? Sometimes a more upright seat tube can make a difference because your legs are further back in relation to your hips, and this can cause your upper body weight to be shifted forward. If your handlebar stem is a bit long, that can exacerbate the problem.
    +1

    Also check your saddle height to stem height ratio between the two bikes. If the stem is lower, you'll feel like you're falling onto the bars until you get used to it.

    You can just tip your saddle back until it feels like it's just starting to get uncomfortable on your sit-tissue -- then tip it very slightly forward. I've been tipping mine slightly forward when I install my clip-on aero bars, but it feels ridiculous for just plain road riding.

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    Isaias NoRacer's Avatar
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    IMHO, the saddle should be level and positioned away from the handlebars just enough that you don't have to over-reach (which is what it sounds like you are doing if your shoulders are becoming fatigued) when on the tops, hoods, or drops.
    2009 mileage = 14,738 miles; 2010 mileage = 15,234 miles; 2011 mileage = 17,344 miles; 2012 mileage = 11,414 miles; 2013 = 12,169

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