Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-06-06, 02:13 PM   #1
mmerner
okay maybe not.
Thread Starter
 
mmerner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: waukesha, wi
Bikes: oh a bunch.
Posts: 598
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
where to get screws?

I strip, break and round-out heads of alot of screws. I usually just head over to the local ace or true value hardware stores for a replacement. Is this okay to do or are special bike shop screws recommended?
__________________
question everything.
mmerner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-06, 02:17 PM   #2
leob1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Middle of the road, NJ
Bikes:
Posts: 2,567
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Uless the screw has a special head or shank, the hardware stores screws are fine. I will often replace a rusty screw with a stainless steel one fro the hardware store. The problem is, the local mom and pop stores that had metric stainless crews are getting hard to find, the big box stores just don't have the variety.
leob1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-06, 02:22 PM   #3
Al1943
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Oklahoma
Bikes: Trek 5500, Colnago C-50
Posts: 9,433
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Nothing wrong with a hardware store but a "fastener" store will usully have a better selection.

Al
Al1943 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-06, 02:24 PM   #4
Metaluna
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: New Hampshire
Bikes: Gunnar Sport, Soma Double Cross Disc
Posts: 914
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
I've been using an online shop called Fastener-Express with good results. They have plenty of metric stainless-steel fasteners available in small quantities at good prices.
Metaluna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-06, 04:34 PM   #5
ryanparrish
Life is short Ride hard
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: In the middle of nowhere
Bikes: not enough
Posts: 1,114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sorry, it seems to me the OP is a few screws short. Sorry about the screw joke we will be returning you to the orginal programming
ryanparrish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-06, 06:05 PM   #6
TrekDen
Double Naught Spy
 
TrekDen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: 2010 Scott CR1 Comp, 2013 Scott Scale 960 MTB
Posts: 1,724
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here's a couple to look at online if you'd like.

BikeToolsEtc

LooseScrews Bicycle Parts
TrekDen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-06, 06:12 PM   #7
cascade168
Klaatu barada nikto
 
cascade168's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern NH
Bikes:
Posts: 1,453
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
These folks are great:

http://www.boltdepot.com/

Everything comes neatly labelled and in individual bags. Fast service and shipping. Good prices. I've tried a bunch of different places and these folks are the best I have found.
cascade168 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-06, 06:16 PM   #8
cascade168
Klaatu barada nikto
 
cascade168's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern NH
Bikes:
Posts: 1,453
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by leob1
Uless the screw has a special head or shank, the hardware stores screws are fine. I will often replace a rusty screw with a stainless steel one fro the hardware store. The problem is, the local mom and pop stores that had metric stainless crews are getting hard to find, the big box stores just don't have the variety.
I think this is a good perspective on what's available "down the street". In my experience, the local h/w store or Home Depot is less than a 50/50 shot for what I want. The specialty fastener websites, such as the one I listed in the last post, seem to do much better - especially for stainless metric fasteners. I usually buy the sizes I think I need and some bigger and smaller. For bikes, 90% of what you need is 4, 5, or 6mm.
cascade168 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-06, 06:37 PM   #9
McDave
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 1,404
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade168
These folks are great:

http://www.boltdepot.com/

Everything comes neatly labelled and in individual bags. Fast service and shipping. Good prices. I've tried a bunch of different places and these folks are the best I have found.
+1 on Bolt Depot.

Word to the wise for those upgrading to stainless bolts: put a dab of anti-seize on the threads otherwise they may gall when you tighten them. If they gall you may have to break them to get them off. Worst case you will have to drill out the remains.
McDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-06, 06:39 AM   #10
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
Posts: 28,917
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmerner
I strip, break and round-out heads of alot of screws.
The several sources recommended for replacement bolts are all good info but maybe you should consider a more fundamental question. I hope this doesn't come across as condecending but why do you damage so many fasteners? Would better quality tools, replacing worn allan wrenches and developing better tightening technique reduce the damage?
HillRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-06, 07:11 AM   #11
rea1high
as seen on crimewatch
 
rea1high's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: UK
Bikes:
Posts: 211
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
these guys supply anything you like. if they don't have it, they'll make it.

http://stigfasteners.easywebstore.co.uk/

Sweet!
rea1high is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-06, 10:04 AM   #12
MudPie
Senior Member
 
MudPie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Southern California
Bikes:
Posts: 1,874
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider
.... I hope this doesn't come across as condecending but why do you damage so many fasteners? Would better quality tools, replacing worn allan wrenches and developing better tightening technique reduce the damage?
Hillrider has a good point.

How are your fasteners failing? Are they failing during installation (too much torque) or removal? Is the tool mating area getting messed up (perhaps the tool is messed-up)?
MudPie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-06, 02:20 PM   #13
mmerner
okay maybe not.
Thread Starter
 
mmerner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: waukesha, wi
Bikes: oh a bunch.
Posts: 598
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
maybe I don't pay enough attention to what I'm working on? maybe I'm too strong? maybe I just wreck the cheap stuff, maybe it's the tools? Probably a little of everything.

example, I put on a new chainring. started tightening the first bolt, got allmost tight, and stripped it. same thing happened on the second bolt. no problems with new bolts from the hardware store.

replacing brake pads on my road bike, it's has those tiny little screws for the pad. 2mm hex/allen head. first one was allready rounded out. another one I rounded because it was real tight. ended up using a plyers to get them all out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider
The several sources recommended for replacement bolts are all good info but maybe you should consider a more fundamental question. I hope this doesn't come across as condecending but why do you damage so many fasteners? Would better quality tools, replacing worn allan wrenches and developing better tightening technique reduce the damage?
__________________
question everything.
mmerner is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:46 AM.