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  1. #1
    Senior Member Scorer75's Avatar
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    Lube to use when installing new pedals?

    It is my understanding that before installing new pedals you sohuld lubricate the threads to assist in removal should you decide to do so.

    Assuming this is correct, what is the correct type of lube to use?

    Can I use this?

  2. #2
    ot.net slave
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    you would be better served with a grease or antiseize. The oil pictures will offer the same protection, but not for as long. It will tend to disappear over time, leaving the surfaces unprotected. For threads, I just use a cheap hi-temp grease (presumably intended for heavy machinery bearings). For bearings, use high quality grease. The secret is to use heaps of it. I always have a syringe full of it ready to apply to any surface so I don't need to get it on my fingers.

    - Joel

  3. #3
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    You want to use some kind of grease. I would suggest Park polylube or something like it. I know both finish line and pedros both make something like it.

  4. #4
    Senior Curmudgeon
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    I use a product called "Nevr-Seize" composed of powdered aluminum dust in a oil base. It is widely used in industry to prevent threaded parts from rusting together or sticking. It works perfectly on pedals and seat posts, but can be messy if you get it on clothing. A single can is lifetime supply and it's cheap.

  5. #5
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    Copper antisieze is the usual for non moving metal-metal but I use std white lithium grease with no ill effects.
    If you do use grease it is good practice to scoop out a few cc into an old film canister and use that for dipping and smearing, maintaining your tube or tub free of contamination.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Scorer75's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies.

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