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  1. #1
    Since 1938... JunkYardBike's Avatar
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    Sturmey Archer pawl springs

    I've disassembled and cleaned the parts on a SA AW 3-speed, ca. 1966

    All the internal parts were coated with oil turned molasses, but the pawls, gears and pinions are in great shape.

    The only problem is that the pawl pins are still sticky and slow moving - I haven't removed them for cleaning because I'm afraid I'll have trouble resetting the pawl springs. Does anyone have any experience with this? Are there any tricks, or is it more simple than it appears?

    Also, while Harris Cyclery has the outside ball retainers available for purchase, it doesn't list the inner ball retainer. Is it recommended to replace this bearing ring as well, or are these balls under less stress making replacement less of a concern?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    jcm
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    I haven't actually removed those springs. No need to. I just shoot the tar out with brake cleaner til they snap nice and free. Whenever people ask about AW hubs, I always pass along this site: http://www.karrot.org/ascotto/three_speed/

    EDIT: Here's another site I had buried back there. I say that because after my intial wanderings within a my AW's, I haven't had to do anything else with them.
    http://www.toehead.plus.com/greass.htm
    Last edited by jcm; 09-20-06 at 09:42 AM.

  3. #3
    Since 1938... JunkYardBike's Avatar
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    Thanks jcm, the brake cleaner worked like a charm. I wish I had used it initially instead of Simple Green (although it's nice to use a biodegradable product).

    I used the first site you recommend for the disassembly, but wasn't aware of the second. Thanks for the link. Reassembly should be relatively simple.

  4. #4
    jcm
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    You're welcome. I actually find that adjusting the bearings when you're done is the most aggravating. The breakdown and re-assembly was fun.

  5. #5
    ot.net slave
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    readjusting the bearings is a snap once you get the hang of the little washer between the driveside cone and locknut - designed to stop the cone from turning. Adjust using the left side only. But now that you've got it done that's no help.

    You guys have inspired me to pull apart the gummiest AW I can find lying around. Lucky I tidied my bench up!

    - Joel

  6. #6
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    For future information, it is not difficult at all to get the pawl springs back in if you take the pins out.

    In fact I always remove the pins so I can "catch" the spring to pevent having the pin fall out and the spring shoot across the room when I'm not expecting it.

    To put them back in, hold the ring gear or planet cage horizontal and put the spring on the pawl You can hold the two together at the tip of the pawl with your fingers. Then stick them into the cage. The circle of the spring and the hole in the pawl won't line up perfectly so you have to work them around with the tip of the pin. Once everything gets aligned it will just slide in. It sounds complicated but it's not when you actually do it. I can put the pin back in in about five seconds.

    Hubs that have been used a lot tend to have worn pawls. It's good to replace them if that's the case. I also found a hub with a broken pawl spring. Other than that I've yet to see an AW hub with any wear at all in it.

    I clean everything out with acetone (which does biodegrade!) and then oil the parts individually with sewing machine oil.

  7. #7
    Since 1938... JunkYardBike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jordanb
    For future information, it is not difficult at all to get the pawl springs back in if you take the pins out.

    In fact I always remove the pins so I can "catch" the spring to pevent having the pin fall out and the spring shoot across the room when I'm not expecting it.

    To put them back in, hold the ring gear or planet cage horizontal and put the spring on the pawl You can hold the two together at the tip of the pawl with your fingers. Then stick them into the cage. The circle of the spring and the hole in the pawl won't line up perfectly so you have to work them around with the tip of the pin. Once everything gets aligned it will just slide in. It sounds complicated but it's not when you actually do it. I can put the pin back in in about five seconds.

    Hubs that have been used a lot tend to have worn pawls. It's good to replace them if that's the case. I also found a hub with a broken pawl spring. Other than that I've yet to see an AW hub with any wear at all in it.

    I clean everything out with acetone (which does biodegrade!) and then oil the parts individually with sewing machine oil.

    Thanks for the response. Next time I service it (in 20 years or so) I'll keep that in mind.

    On another matter, related to servicing SA hubs, do you grease the bearing balls? I've read elsewhere on the 'net that only a light coating of grease should be applied to the groove in the dust covers (and I guess the inside of the retaining cover on the internal bearing balls.)

  8. #8
    jcm
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    Grease the bearings. Push it in there. Don't use something super heavy like boat trailer grease. You can use white lithium grease. Put about two teaspoons of medium weight oil in the hub after you re-assemble it. Don't use light household oil. It will only run out the threads and it degrades. Use something like Outer's gun oil or 10-50 motor oil.

    EDIT: If you ride every day, a couple drops per week or two will suffice. You will notice that your cog and spokes get dirty from the oil. This is normal as it seeps out the threads and migrates outward.

  9. #9
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    Sturmey Archer advises against greasing the bearings. The grease will just get washed out anyway. The way it is supposed to work is that the oil seeps out through the bearings keeping them lubricated

  10. #10
    jcm
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    Ok, don't grease 'em. Probably will work fine either way. The hub on my '64 was working perfectly when I took it apart out of curiosity. It was dry as a bone in there and probably was for years. Very fine mechanism indeed.

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