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Old 09-22-06, 01:56 PM   #1
I_bRAD
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low flange hubs vs high flange...

What's the difference? (besides the obvious) Is it purely cosmetic, or am I missing something?
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Old 09-22-06, 02:00 PM   #2
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High flange offers more lateral rigidity.
(and looks pretty)
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Old 09-22-06, 02:04 PM   #3
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They're gonna be for an old steel frame... so I'm not so sure the lateral rigidity is an issue. The pretty argument works for me though
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Old 09-22-06, 03:24 PM   #4
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The amount of lateral rigidity offered by high-flange hubs is functionally meaningless. There are historical reasons for high-flange (e.g., you could replace spokes on a fixed-gear without removing the cog) but most of those reasons have to do with spoke breakage being common back in the day. Spoke materials/manufacture have improved a lot since then.

So the difference is mainly cosmetic. But it's not just perference of look - high-flange hubs can help to show that you're hip and U know it, too
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Old 09-22-06, 03:31 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timcupery
- high-flange hubs can help to show that you're hip and U know it, too
That's funny! I can remember when low flange hubs told that same story.
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Old 09-23-06, 10:29 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
That's funny! I can remember when low flange hubs told that same story.
I built wheels with low flange hubs for my '74 Px10 when I bought it new because all of the cheap bikes at that time had high flange hubs.
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Old 09-23-06, 10:41 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheldon brown
Most hubs in current production are "small-flange" or "low-flange" designs, where the flange is no taller than it needs to be to provide a suitable place for the spoke holes to be drilled.

"High-flange" or "large-flange" hubs have a larger flange, usually drilled out for lightness. They are transmit torsional forces with less stress to the spokes than small-flange hubs do, but this is not a problem in practice with modern equipment. High-flange hubs can make a wheel with slightly greater lateral strength than equivalent small-flange hubs, because the spokes create a wider bracing angle to the rim. This makes them popular with track sprinters, who create greater-than-normal side loads on their wheels.
..
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Old 09-23-06, 02:18 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Dirtdrop
I built wheels with low flange hubs for my '74 Px10 when I bought it new because all of the cheap bikes at that time had high flange hubs.
This controversy goes back to the 1950s, maybe longer. Even then, wide flange hubs were considered "bling" (to use a current term) by some. I haven't seen proof that they make stiffer wheels, although they were popular on track wheels. Maybe regular hubs make a marginally lighter wheel, but the difference has to be small. Go with what looks right for the vintage you're concerned with. My Jeunet has the wide flange hubs and looks just right for the period and being a track bike.
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