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Old 09-26-06, 10:02 PM   #1
basscadetz
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suggestions: frozen seatpost

i have an old fuji im taking apart for a fixie conversion, and the damn seatpost will NOT move. suggestions? wd-40 and a pipe wrench? i dont care if i kill the post because i have others.
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Old 09-26-06, 10:14 PM   #2
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Sheldon Brown's website has a great article on getting that seatpost out -- http://sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html

This should help. WD-40 is less of a lubricant than something to move water off a surface. Penetrating oil is better at going down the microscopic nooks and crannies to help with getting the seat tube off.
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Old 09-26-06, 10:17 PM   #3
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i looked there but i guess i didnt look hard enough
thank you.
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Old 09-26-06, 10:22 PM   #4
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Good luck on that seatpost in any case, and luck++ with the fixie conversion. I don't have the guts (or endurance) yet to consider one yet... especially a brakeless.
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Old 09-26-06, 10:25 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by mlts22
Good luck on that seatpost in any case, and luck++ with the fixie conversion. I don't have the guts (or endurance) yet to consider one yet... especially a brakeless.
Fixie ain't that scary, but it is a good workout, and a lot of fun! My current fixie has TWO brakes. I'd rather not go splat on the back of some SUV

basscadetz: I've had good luck with Liquid Wrench penetrating oil, though it's supposed to work best for steel-on-steel. For aluminum-on-steel, ammonia is better apparently. Also, is there really a place called "Aslut, Oklahoma"???

EDIT- I just figured out that it's "Tulsa" backwards. Hehehehe...
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Old 09-26-06, 10:38 PM   #6
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it looks like its steel on steel, really old fuji. you think 3-in-1 oil would be good? ive given up on it tonight to let the oil penetrate. im planning on a flip flop with a front brake. this is my first fixie.
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Old 09-26-06, 10:42 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by basscadetz
it looks like its steel on steel, really old fuji. you think 3-in-1 oil would be good? ive given up on it tonight to let the oil penetrate. im planning on a flip flop with a front brake. this is my first fixie.
Any lubricant at all will help, but penetrating oil will be better. Concentrate on getting the seatpost to rotate rather than pull out first. Once you've got it rotating, you'll be able to work the oil in and pulling it out will be easier.

Flip flop hub and front brake is a good way to go. That's how I setup my first fixie. Rebuilt the back wheel myself, and had the whole thing up and running for a total cost of ~$100
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Old 09-26-06, 10:47 PM   #8
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okay then you're the person i need to talk to about this. im getting mixed stuff from the fixie board. also they say that my old fuji gran tourer isnt worth this project, but i found it in the trash so 100 bucks is nothing. you have aim or anything similar i can pick your brain with sometime?
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Old 09-26-06, 10:52 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by basscadetz
okay then you're the person i need to talk to about this. im getting mixed stuff from the fixie board. also they say that my old fuji gran tourer isnt worth this project, but i found it in the trash so 100 bucks is nothing. you have aim or anything similar i can pick your brain with sometime?
Yep, my AIM username is same as my bikeforums username, go right ahead!

I don't know why the Fuji Gran Tourer wouldn't be worth your while. My first fixie was built from a similar bike, the Lotus Elan, which is also plain ol' high-ten steel. It was fun as hell! Of course, I couldn't reuse as many of the original components because they were of low quality, especially the cranks which had non-replaceable chainrings. So you may be able to reuse more parts if you start with a better bike, but there's no reason not to fixify that Gran Tourer! Actually, I felt kind of guilty converting a nice frame (my Fuji Allegro) to fixed gear... but I have no qualms about a cheap one, so it's a good thing

Last edited by moxfyre; 09-26-06 at 10:58 PM.
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Old 09-26-06, 10:54 PM   #10
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do you know how to date a fuji? i looked everywhere, also i added you to aim. im basscadetz on aim
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Old 09-26-06, 10:56 PM   #11
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do you know how to date a fuji? i looked everywhere, also i added you to aim. im basscadetz on aim
Nope, but if you send high-res photos, I am pretty good at guessing based on the components and styling. I have developed very good bike-dar over the past couple years Also, try the Classics & Vintage forum. There are some real experts in there, especially T-Mar who's been cataloging old bikes and their components for years.

I'm headed to bed, but feel free to shoot me some fixie questions whenever I get back online.
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Old 09-26-06, 10:58 PM   #12
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awesome. will do. ill have pics for you next time i see you. thanks again!
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Old 09-27-06, 07:40 AM   #13
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let oil penetrate for a day or two.
Clamp seat post in vice.
turn frame by hand to loosen things up
work post out buy twisting and pulling at same time.
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Old 09-27-06, 07:48 AM   #14
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ok on the rusted seat post , the best stuff to use is PB blaster

any wally world or auto store


let sit for a couple of hr. or over night then do the vise thing like said in above post.


Jeff
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Old 09-27-06, 08:46 AM   #15
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I agree that Sheldon's site has an excellent write-up on the subject of stuck seatposts..........A method I've used is to try and get some penetrating oil in with an overnight soak, then take a junk saddle and put it on the seatpost. Next, use a hammer on the forward portion of the saddle, first one side and then the other. If the seatpost/seattube bond breaks loose, you can then take the saddle with your hands and work the post out. Worst case, you'll destroy the junk saddle or break the seat clamp (or both). The leverage is excellent when striking the forward portion of the saddle, and the force of the hammer is pretty persuasive. I have a feeling there are worse cases of stuck seatposts than what I've dealt with, but I've always been able to get the ones I've worked on loose using this method-

Last edited by well biked; 09-27-06 at 01:11 PM.
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Old 09-27-06, 01:04 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPEED FREAK
ok on the rusted seat post , the best stuff to use is PB blaster

any wally world or auto store


let sit for a couple of hr. or over night then do the vise thing like said in above post.


Jeff

^^ YESSIR, PB is good stuff, I use it on my fleet of Jeeps all the time
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Old 09-27-06, 03:20 PM   #17
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when all the above faills, freez the post with an upside down can of dust-off. That will shrink the post and you can pull it out.
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Old 09-28-06, 08:20 PM   #18
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If all above fails. SAWZALL!!!! Seriously.
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