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Old 10-03-06, 03:13 PM   #1
joe v
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Polish dull paint - car wax, Pledge, spit?

Talking 'bout this kind of 'satin'-look paint; is it possible to get a glossy finish
or is it a lost cause (don't know a lot about paint, I'm afraid):
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Old 10-03-06, 04:40 PM   #2
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You might be able to shoot it with a clear gloss coat. If the paint is just oxidized, go to an auto paint store and get some buffing compound and buff it out.
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Old 10-03-06, 05:08 PM   #3
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Finesse II by DuPont. Its the final buff compound they use for shining up show paind jobs. If it doesn't work, your paint is probably too far gone. You can get it at auto paint supply stores.bk
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Old 10-03-06, 05:19 PM   #4
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Progressive abrasives, applied by hand. Start out with some mild cleaner/wax, like Meguirs, on a small section. If it doesn't work, move up to polishing compound, followed by cleaner wax. If that doesn't work, go to rubbing compound, polishing compound, cleaner wax. Be careful with the rubbing compound, it will go right through the paint on any sharp edges, like lugs, etc. And of course, don't use harsh abrasives on decals.

If the rubbing compound doesn't do it, I would give up.
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Old 10-03-06, 05:40 PM   #5
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Just to follow up on Rensho's excellent advice, once you have stepped up the aggressiveness scale to achieve the results you desire, you'll want to step back down the scale using the products in reverse order to get optimal results.

From what I can tell from your photo, I think you'll be pleased with the results. Of course, with metallics paints, it can be hard to predict how they'll respond to polishing.

BTW, what's with the vintage Campy decals and the Suntour shifters? Not judging, just curious.
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Old 10-03-06, 05:46 PM   #6
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Any brand of automotive 'cut & polish' should make a big difference. The 'cut' removes oxidised paint that causes dullness along with scuffs, dirt and minor scratches, and the 'polish' does just that - a nice new shine and a protectice coat of silicone wax.
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Old 10-03-06, 05:48 PM   #7
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Buy some Rubbing Compound in Wal*Mart or wherever and polish it off. Make sure the paint is dust free first .
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Old 10-03-06, 11:44 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyman991
BTW, what's with the vintage Campy decals and the Suntour shifters? Not judging, just curious.
I haven't bought it yet, so I have to judge by photo's as well, but aren't those Campa brakes? There are more pix in the Vintage forum (a 'Van Hout' search will get you there) and the number of decals is one of my worries!
Anyways, thanks for the replies!
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Old 10-05-06, 12:23 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by San Rensho
Progressive abrasives, applied by hand. Start out with some mild cleaner/wax, like Meguirs, on a small section. If it doesn't work, move up to polishing compound, followed by cleaner wax. If that doesn't work, go to rubbing compound, polishing compound, cleaner wax. Be careful with the rubbing compound, it will go right through the paint on any sharp edges, like lugs, etc. And of course, don't use harsh abrasives on decals.

If the rubbing compound doesn't do it, I would give up.
If you want to do it right then follow San Rensho's advice above!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Don't listen to these other people telling you to go to the rubbing compound first...THAT IS WRONG!!

You always take the less aggressive path first then work your way up. I have classic cars and this is what I do with any car I'm trying to get dullness out of the paint. In fact with modern clear coats you can't even use a rubbing compound on it because once you strip off the clear coat your paint is screwed. And bike paint jobs are not as good as car paint jobs so you really have to be careful you don't get to aggressive. I would try the cleaner wax first as Rensho mentions and buff lightly, if that didn't work then use the cleaner wax again but buff harder and do this approach throughout his steps.

And the Mequirs product that Rensho mentions is very good stuff; it's what I use on my cars, and I don't throw whatever dime store schit I can find on my cars!!

Also you have a silver bike, silver and red are the two fastest colors to oxidize or fade. Once you have the shine back then lay down a protective wax coating using Mequirs Gold Class which has UV protection built in, and reapply about every 3 months.

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Old 10-05-06, 09:30 AM   #10
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After looking at the picture, I would say lost cause!
You'd be better off either just waxing it and call it good, or take it apart and have a powdercoat finish applied. PC would be a better return on your $$$. Good waxes/polishing compounds aren't cheap. Around here a powdercoating is $100, give or take.
note; if you use the heavier cut compounds on metallic paint, you will scratch the metal flakes and end up about where you started.
Or you could try your hand at a rattle can paint job for less than $50.
Just my 2 cents. Good luck with that!
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Old 10-05-06, 10:54 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Dr.Deltron
After looking at the picture, I would say lost cause!!
I looked at the same pix as you and I don't see it as a lost couse because in a picture you can't really tell.

Don't let negative people influence your decision, do the cleaner/wax program Rensho outlined and you might be surprised. And so what if you spend money on wax products that don't work? Worst case is that you use those products on your car!! Except don't use the rubbing compound on your car. Just buy the first step first and try it over and over and over, if nothing happens then buy the next step and so on.

Try the first step several times because it's the least aggressive and it might just work. Be careful around decals. You may have to expend some physical energy, but that's free.
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Old 10-05-06, 02:38 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by froze
1) I looked at the same pix as you and I don't see it as a lost couse because in a picture you can't really tell.
2) Don't let negative people influence your decision,
3) You may have to expend some physical energy, but that's free.
1A) From THAT picture I can pretty much tell.
2A) Not negative, just realistic.
3A) FREE??? Time IS money!

AND what about the decals/stickers? Unless you want to lose those anyway.

WAX that frame & call it good. Until it DOES need a refinish. Unless you have WAY too much time on your hands AND a gallon or two of elbow grease!
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Old 10-05-06, 11:58 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.Deltron
1A) From THAT picture I can pretty much tell.
2A) Not negative, just realistic.
3A) FREE??? Time IS money!

AND what about the decals/stickers? Unless you want to lose those anyway.

WAX that frame & call it good. Until it DOES need a refinish. Unless you have WAY too much time on your hands AND a gallon or two of elbow grease!
Wow, you must have one good monitor and must be more experienced then I because I can't tell and I've been working with classic cars and non clear coat paints for over 30 years. I humbly bow down before you!!
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Old 10-05-06, 11:59 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe v
Talking 'bout this kind of 'satin'-look paint; is it possible to get a glossy finish
or is it a lost cause (don't know a lot about paint, I'm afraid):
Joe I hope you let us know how the paint turns out.
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Old 10-06-06, 04:22 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe v
Talking 'bout this kind of 'satin'-look paint; is it possible to get a glossy finish
or is it a lost cause (don't know a lot about paint, I'm afraid):


Yeah I've also worked with faded/oxidized paint for 30 years too. The advice given by 'San Rensho' and 'froze' is very good. But you need to be patient. My advice is to cover the decals with a good automotive masking tape, then try the steps 'Rensho' advised, being careful around the decals. Use only your fingers and no machine. Test on the underside of the downtube or lower seattube until you find out what works good. Go slow and have fun bringing new life into that old paint.
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Old 10-06-06, 05:44 AM   #16
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Is it definitely oxidized? Or was it a satin finish from the factory? If t's the latter, then a 'flattening agent' was added to the finish when it was sprayed, and it'll never shine properly. If it's just oxidized, but has NO clearcoat over it, then I'd go with Dr Del on this one. Trying to shine a metallic that has oxidized is a true hassle. If it DOES have a clear over it, there's some hope, but it may be too far gone.
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Old 10-06-06, 08:23 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by duane041
Is it definitely oxidized? Or was it a satin finish from the factory? If t's the latter, then a 'flattening agent' was added to the finish when it was sprayed, and it'll never shine properly. If it's just oxidized, but has NO clearcoat over it, then I'd go with Dr Del on this one. Trying to shine a metallic that has oxidized is a true hassle. If it DOES have a clear over it, there's some hope, but it may be too far gone.
Any oxidized paint job is a "true hassle" to bring back because it takes elbow grease, but on a bike it's far easier then trying to do a car! And I've never experienced anymore difficulty with metallic paint then none. The only real difference is the color, some colors like silver the bike has oxidizes faster and more then other colors thus it could take more work then say white. As far as the bike manufacture using a flattening agent on the paint, that I wouldn't know without physically seeing the bike; but I can't remember any bike coming from a manufacture painted like that, but I guess that's possible.
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Old 10-06-06, 08:45 AM   #18
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OK...I guess the point I was try to make is, that polishing a bike is

A ROYAL PAIN IN THE ELBOW! (and finger!)

especially a bike with what appear to be a number of stickers/decals. How much is YOUR time worth?
At $10/hour, a hundred dollars for a NEW powdercoat is probably a better way to go. If your time is worth MORE than $10/hr, even MORE reason to refinish. But if you'd rather work on your bike than WATCH TV, then definetly try to polish it out. Good luck with whatever you decide.
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Old 10-06-06, 01:02 PM   #19
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Or you could watch t.v. and work on the bike at the same time.
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Old 10-06-06, 09:32 PM   #20
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[QUOTE=froze As far as the bike manufacture using a flattening agent on the paint, that I wouldn't know without physically seeing the bike; but I can't remember any bike coming from a manufacture painted like that, but I guess that's possible.[/QUOTE]
I happen to have am "Outfitters" (?) MTB that is finished in a god-awful flat green. It's really ugly. But I doubt a road bike would be finished this way.

an Yeah, you're right, any oxidized paint is a drag. Especially when red goes pink
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Old 10-06-06, 11:34 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lossy
Or you could watch t.v. and work on the bike at the same time.
With what Dr Deltorn said about time is money, makes me wonder just how much money I spent watching TV or listening to the stereo!
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Old 10-07-06, 05:40 PM   #22
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With what Dr Deltorn said about time is money, makes me wonder just how much money I spent watching TV or listening to the stereo!
Difference being that polishing involves EFFORT! Watching TV/listening to the stereo is RELAXING! (usually)
Only job I've ever had that involved relaxing was driving a taxi!
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