Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-05-06, 07:06 AM   #1
masi61
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
masi61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SW Ohio
Bikes: Puch Marco Polo, Saint Tropez, Masi Gran Criterium
Posts: 1,140
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
maximum safe length of carbon steer tube spacer

I have a new frame and fork. Its a Flyte SRS-3 and the fork is an all carbon Reynolds Ouzo Pro. The guy at flyte gave me 4 small spacers that he says add up to 1" which he says is the max for spacers before the stem goes on. Does everyone agree? or could I go a little thicker on the spacers to rise the stem up just a little more? The Reynolds fork owners manual that came with it makes no mention of this by the way.
The manual does, talk about how to cut the steer tube to size with a hacksaw fitted with a ceramic tile blade. It says to cut the fork off 3mm below the top of the stem. Is this a DIY job? Would you do this step in the home workshop? I'm a little reluctant to take my Chinese made Flyte bike frame to the LBS for fine tuning because they'll immediately see what I'm up to and possibly chastise me for not going with one of their more reputable brands.
Thanks for your insights folks.
masi61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-06, 07:41 AM   #2
LóFarkas
LF for the accentdeprived
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Bikes:
Posts: 3,549
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would saw it myself but then I don't trust the local shops at all. Wear a mask (CF dust is said to be pretty gross on health), and go slowly and carefully.
As to height, I'm sure there is no clear-cut rule. They clearly left the steerer that long with the idea that some people might use all that length. The bottom line is your weight and riding style. How much you stand up and hammer, do you drop down curbs, smash into things etc.
I mean, any kind of riding by a 200-pound guy will stress every part 2x as much as the exact same riding done by his 100-pound little sister. Which are you?


(BTW, easy with the stem clamp... they say it's easy to crush a CF steerer)
LóFarkas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-06, 07:55 AM   #3
wrench
Pro wheelbuilder UK
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 127
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Carbon Fiblre is hard to cut straight without the proper tool (Park SG6 threadless saw guide) but you can get away with using a fine hacksaw blade(big one not junior hacksaw type) and run it against the end of a piece of correct length steel pipe slipped over the steerer. Alternatively a zip tie or tape fastened arounfd the steerer will act a a makeshift guide while you cut. Better still, go and see the folks at your local bike shop like me and you will hopefully be surprised at the reception. They want your trade now and will not mind helping if it will lead to customer satisfaction and a return visit even if you dod not get the bike there.
wrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-06, 08:02 AM   #4
masi61
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
masi61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SW Ohio
Bikes: Puch Marco Polo, Saint Tropez, Masi Gran Criterium
Posts: 1,140
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LóFarkas
I would saw it myself but then I don't trust the local shops at all. Wear a mask (CF dust is said to be pretty gross on health), and go slowly and carefully.
As to height, I'm sure there is no clear-cut rule. They clearly left the steerer that long with the idea that some people might use all that length. The bottom line is your weight and riding style. How much you stand up and hammer, do you drop down curbs, smash into things etc.
I mean, any kind of riding by a 200-pound guy will stress every part 2x as much as the exact same riding done by his 100-pound little sister. Which are you?


(BTW, easy with the stem clamp... they say it's easy to crush a CF steerer)
Sorry to say but I'm a #235 guy, not his little sister.
masi61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-06, 08:58 AM   #5
CRUM
Recovering Retro-grouch
 
CRUM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Some call it God's country. I call it Acton, Maine
Bikes: Too Many - 7 or 8
Posts: 5,008
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I called Reynolds awhile ago and they told me their max standard for their 1 1/8" forks is no more than 40 mm from the top of the Headset. That's about 1.5" inches to the bottom of the stem. Being the conservative guy that I am, I have never gone over that 40 mm with any carbon fork I have installed. If you are concerened about it, cut it short and put on a stem with more rise.

I use a saw guide. I tape the steerer with masking tape and then cut through it with a hacksaw blade of 20 teeth per inch or more. Then I finish the cut with a fine file around the edges.

From Reynolds Site

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reynolds FAQ
How many spacers can I use?
On a 1 1/8” fork you can use a maximum of 4.0 cm/1.58” of spacers.
On a 1” fork you can use a maximum of 2.5 cm/1.0” of spacers.
__________________
Keep it 'tween the ditches

My Blog - Lost in the Bo Zone
CRUM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-06, 11:15 AM   #6
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
Posts: 29,124
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 181 Post(s)
The previous rule for 1" carbon steerers was no more than 25 mm (1") of spacers above the headset and below the stem. For 1-1/8" carbon steerers, Easton allows as much as 50 mm (2") of spacers but I don't know if Reynolds does the same.

As to cutting carbon steerers, I've had good success using fine tooth hacksaw blade (32 tpi) and cutting gently. I also wrap a turn or two of masking tape around the cut line before sawing to protect the fibers from tearing. Again, cut gently letting the weight of the saw provide the force.

I use a Spin Doctor cutting guide (Performance's knock off of the Park guide) and it has worked very well. In the past I've snugged a hose clamp down on the steerer and used the upper edge as a cutting guide. I've only done this on Cr-Mo steerers but I don't see why it wouldn't be ok on carbon also.

Finally, MEASURE TWICE, CUT ONCE. There is no going back.
HillRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:55 PM.