Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    99
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    rear derailleur position in dropouts - slipping wheel!

    I did a short ride (~8 mi) this morning to run some errands. A few roads were a bit rough. When I got home, I saw that my rear tire was rubbing the chainstay on the left side. Even though the quick release felt tight, the wheel had somehow slipped.

    I noticed that the wheel sits pretty far foward, and I'm wondering if it may sit more snugly in the dropouts if it was further in the recesses. I have an old style derailleur that also sits in the dropout, held there by a nut. Should I move both the RD and wheel back, to avoid the slippage from happening again?

    Attached are pics of right and left side: notice how much space there is in the dropouts.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,105
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd sure try moving the wheel back. With the wheel where it is I'm wondering what the QR has to grip onto.

  3. #3
    bike rider jimmythefly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Seattle
    My Bikes
    83 Trek 500, 2x 90s Novara Randonee, Zion 737, Specialized Rockhopper, Nishiki Colorado, Univega Specialissima
    Posts
    282
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes, move it all back. Make sure that you re-adjust your brake pads. Make sure that you still have a long enough chain to work in the big cog/big chainring combination (or at least be aware of it if you don't). I have used a setup of your type before, without problem.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    99
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    (Wow, replies within 10 minutes! Amazing!)

    Thanks retro and jimmy... I just wasn't sure if there was some bizarre reason the wheel should be hanging so far out there. I'm pretty sure there's enough chain.

    Will do the move and let you know how it works out...

  5. #5
    Gone, but not forgotten Sheldon Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Newtonville, Massachusetts
    My Bikes
    See: http://sheldonbrown.org/bicycles
    Posts
    2,301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hackybiker
    I did a short ride (~8 mi) this morning to run some errands. A few roads were a bit rough. When I got home, I saw that my rear tire was rubbing the chainstay on the left side. Even though the quick release felt tight, the wheel had somehow slipped.

    I noticed that the wheel sits pretty far foward, and I'm wondering if it may sit more snugly in the dropouts if it was further in the recesses. I have an old style derailleur that also sits in the dropout, held there by a nut. Should I move both the RD and wheel back, to avoid the slippage from happening again?

    Attached are pics of right and left side: notice how much space there is in the dropouts.
    The derailer's adaptor claw has been slipping forward in the dropout. The adaptor claw should be all the way back in the slot.

    Remove the wheel, then loosen the bolt that holds the adaptor claw and slide the adaptor claw as far back as it will go, then re-tighen the adaptor claw bolt. (Might be a good idea to lube the threads of the bolt if they aren't already lubed.)

    Re-install the wheel, making sure the skewer is nice and snug.

    Sometimes, the rear axle protrudes too far from the locknuts and the skewer may be tigthening against the end of the axle. The easy way to check this is to remove the conical springs from the skewer and see if that makes it hold better. (Those springs are not essential, just helpful for rapid wheel changes because they keep the skewer centered when it's not in the frame.)

    Sheldon "Lube All Threads" Brown
    Code:
    +-----------------------------------------------------------+
    |   The difference between science and the fuzzy subjects   |
    |   is that science requires reasoning while those other    |
    |   subjects merely require scholarship.                    |
    |                                    --Robert A. Heinlein   |
    +-----------------------------------------------------------+
    [COLOR=blue][CENTER][b]Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts[/b]
    Phone 617-244-9772, FAX 617-244-1041
    [URL= http://harriscyclery.com] http://harriscyclery.com[/URL]
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    [URL=http://captainbike.com]http://captainbike.com[/URL]
    Useful articles about bicycles and cycling
    [URL=http://sheldonbrown.com]http://sheldonbrown.com[/URL] [/CENTER] [/COLOR]

  6. #6
    Broom Wagon Fodder reverborama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    My Bikes
    Fuji Supreme; Fuji Royale; Schwinn Varsity; Nishiki International; Schwinn Premis, Falcon Merckx
    Posts
    1,145
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow! a Two-fer! I was just getting ready to ask if it was advisable to use a quick release hub with a drop-out mounted derailleur! Now I see that you can, and what you should watch out for.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    99
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks, Sheldon! I made those changes and took it out for a spin. So far so good! From the looks of the scratch patterns along the dropouts, it does seem like it had slipped.

    But I was wrong about having enough chain--I can no longer get the largest chainring and largest rear gear. It's no big deal since I never use that combo; when it comes time to replace the chain, it should be taken care of.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •