Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Dirt Bomb sknhgy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    2,575
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    bike fell and bent gears out of line

    First off, I'm not familiar with bike terminology so pardon my descriptions and please, if you answer, use simple wording.
    My Trek 820 fell on the right side and bent the "hanging down gear arm" out-of-line with the rest of the drive train. I took it to the bike shop. They said it was a simple fix. I didn't watch what they did but wish I had. I assume they just bent it back.
    Has anyone experienced this? I never realized bikes could be so fragile if they get knocked over. Can you tell me what to do next time to fix it? BTW, I am fairly accomplished with tools. I'm just not familiar with the drive train on a bicycle.
    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Home alone
    My Bikes
    Trek 4300 X 2. Trek 1000, Trek 6000
    Posts
    6,021
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

  3. #3
    Life is short Ride hard
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    In the middle of nowhere
    My Bikes
    not enough
    Posts
    1,114
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    sheldonbrown.com and parktools.com will help
    The Ferrari ('05 Bianchi Forza) had a flat (Stupid Glass) the Japanese wagon ('77 Nishiki with Arkel Utility Basket) was in the body shop (On my bench being repainted...repent ye rust)
    so I took the SUV ( Cannondale V2000 Active 100SL)

  4. #4
    Senior Member shoerhino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    549
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've had that happen. I bent the rear derailuer hanger back to the veritcal position by eyeballing it. They had space age tools for this procedure today but it worked well enough for me and restore the shifting.

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=39

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    308
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    853 or some such tubing right? i had this happen when i went to sprint and the rear wheel Jammed up against the seat stay and seat tube (rear QR malfunction.. CHECK UM FOLKS!)... bent really nasty. took it to the LBS and Jeff.. thanks Jeff. was able to get it right as rain with a der hanger alignment tool... the first bike shop i went to said it was now wall art and i had to toss the frame so. get second opinions if need be.
    the internet is the death of many things.

  6. #6
    Banned. teiaperigosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    40th, up in the 30th
    Posts
    1,694
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by shoerhino
    I've had that happen. I bent the rear derailuer hanger back to the veritcal position by eyeballing it. They had space age tools for this procedure today but it worked well enough for me and restore the shifting.

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=39
    +1 had that happen a long time ago when I knew very little about bike maintenance (when I used to rock a derrailler too)...saw it was bent, I think I hammered it flat

  7. #7
    yes
    yes is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    675
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If they charge only $10, it is probably worth it, since they have a nice tool to make it really straight. Then, if something else is screwy, you know that it's probably not the der. alignment.

  8. #8
    Senior Member mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Snowy midwest
    Posts
    5,392
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bent derailure hangers are really tricky. Get yourself a book on bicycle repair and monkey around with it. You can often get a bicycle repair book at your local library if you don't want to make the investment.

    Anyway, fill your head with mechanical knowledge and have at it. At this point, you don't have anything to lose but time. If time is too valuable and you don't have the time to mess with it, then bring it in to the shop. Derailures are not impossible to do, but it takes time to learn how to get them on and get them adjusted correctly. In addition to the derailure, you have to be comfortable with chain "breaking" to get the chain apart and thread it through the derailure pulleys.

    Then you have to know how to tension the cable.... ayaiyai, it might be more complicated than I thought.

    So, in a nutshell, it is do-able if you have the time to do it - kinda technical (about a 7.5 on a scale of 10), but a good learning experience and you really don't have anything to lose at this point.
    Mike

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •