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  1. #1
    如果你能讀了這個你講中文 genericbikedude's Avatar
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    Building up a set of road wheels

    I just got a techy road bike with rolf wheels for really cheap on craigslist. I've always been skeptical of boutique wheels (and I still am), but dayum, they do make one go faster. Anyway, I want another set for more casual riding -- something nice, traditional and more durable. I'm thinking ultegra hubs to velocity aeroheads, 28 hole 2x in the front and 32h 3x in the back. Also, I've never built with bladed spokes, so I'm thinking of trying it out just for ****s and giggles.

    So what do people think? Are there better value road hubs out there than ultegra, especially for durability and riding in sloppy conditions? Iím looking for good seals, smooth rolling, and decent price.

    Same for rims Ė what do people recommend? Durability is the main consideration, with weight a somewhat distant second.

    And spokes Ė Iíve only ever build with DT comp. Do people think that aero spokes are worthwhile? They certainly look cool, are easier to *ping*, and donít surprise you with torsion.

  2. #2
    me have long head tube TallRider's Avatar
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    First, if you're going to do the aeroheads, you should use the asymmetrical version of the rim for the rear wheel. It's lighter than the standard and makes for a stronger, more durable, and largely dishless rear wheel.
    28 front, 32 rear is fine, as are the crossing patterns you mentioned. If you ride on lots of potholed roads with thin/high-pressure tires and are a big guy, you might want 32 spokes on the front wheel, possibly 36 on the rear, but 28/32 should do you just fine.

    Ultegra hubs are solid and very durable - if you want to "do it right" you should build them up with washers between the spoke head and the hub flange (cuts down on possibility of play in the slightly wider spoke-holes in the Ultegra flange; 2.6mm as opposed to 2.3mm with Dura-Ace I think), although this won't be possible if you're using bladed spokes. Ultegra hubs are sealed effectively enough, although you'd likely be comparably fine with 105 or even Tiagra hubs.

    I'd go ovalized spokes over aero/bladed spokes, but that's with intuition hopefully based on specific factors that I can't think of right now.

  3. #3
    Senior Member kgatwork's Avatar
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    You might have to slot the hub for bladed spokes.

  4. #4
    A treat for the freaks! MCODave's Avatar
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    Sounds like a plan to me! Riding wheels you built yourself is a great feeling.

    Also, I second using the Aerohead OC on the rear - eliminates a lot of the unequal tension that makes rear wheels more likely to break.

    You can use Wheelsmith AE15 or XE14 aero spokes without slotting your hubs. You can get them (and lots of other good stuff and wheel advice) here:

    http://oddsandendos.safeshopper.com/20/cat20.htm?987
    Last edited by MCODave; 10-26-06 at 12:37 PM.

  5. #5
    In beaurocratic limbo urbanknight's Avatar
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    Rims with double eyelets are generally more durable, so you might want to consider Mavic Open Pros at a penalty of only 45g for the set, but either way it sounds like you have a good plan here. I don't think I'd bother with bladed spokes. Aero/oval spokes are nice because they let you see if they're twisting, but I've never had any trouble with straight guage or 14/15/14 double butted, DT or Wheelsmith.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Generally bladed spokes are used on low spoke count radial or 1X laced wheels. I don't think I've ever seen 3X or 2X bladed spoke wheels, sure it can be done but it just doesn't sound like such a great idea. Ovalized or double butted sounds like a better idea.
    I keep hoping that someone will post actual data comparing the rear wheel driveside and non-driveside spoke tension of a properly built wheel with centered rim using an asymetrical Velocity Arrowhead, 8, 9, or 10-speed hub. My conventional 9-speed and 10-speed rear wheels have at least 35% less tension on the non-driveside with Open Pro and DT RR 1.1 rims.

    Al

  7. #7
    The AVatar Ninja SaabFan's Avatar
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    If you're going for durability, how about a Velocity Deep V instead of the Aerohead? It's one of my favorite rims. Nice looks, indestructible (thanks to the deep profile), plus whatever "aero" benefit (real or imaginary) a deep section rim gives.
    Q: How many surrealists does it take to change a light bulb?
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  8. #8
    In beaurocratic limbo urbanknight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al1943
    Generally bladed spokes are used on low spoke count radial or 1X laced wheels. I don't think I've ever seen 3X or 2X bladed spoke wheels, sure it can be done but it just doesn't sound like such a great idea. Ovalized or double butted sounds like a better idea.
    I keep hoping that someone will post actual data comparing the rear wheel driveside and non-driveside spoke tension of a properly built wheel with centered rim using an asymetrical Velocity Arrowhead, 8, 9, or 10-speed hub. My conventional 9-speed and 10-speed rear wheels have at least 35% less tension on the non-driveside with Open Pro and DT RR 1.1 rims.
    I've seen 2x and 3x wheels with bladed spokes, it's not a problem. It just gets heavy as I believe they are no lighter than 14 straight guage spokes. There is still more tension on the drive side of an OCR rim, but not as much difference as on a normal wheel. The required spoke tension is whatever it takes to get the rim centered, really.

    Quote Originally Posted by SaabFan
    If you're going for durability, how about a Velocity Deep V instead of the Aerohead? It's one of my favorite rims. Nice looks, indestructible (thanks to the deep profile), plus whatever "aero" benefit (real or imaginary) a deep section rim gives.
    +1 That's a nice rim. I tad on the heavy side, though.

  9. #9
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    +1 on just going with Double butted spokes. Aeros will just cause a headache in terms of having to slot the hub and void the warranty, unless you go with one of the spoke styles that is aero without slotting required... Non Aero spokes will also let you use washers, which makes for one hell of a strong wheel. Torsion on regular spokes shouldn't be a problem if you build the wheel properly... so I always use straight or Double butted spokes on builds.

  10. #10
    me have long head tube TallRider's Avatar
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    Double eyelets are generally good things, all else being equal. However, the Velocity Aeroheads have proven themselves to be at least the equal of the Mavic Open Pro, and probably better.

    Velocity Deep V is a very durable rim, aerodynamic, but heavier. It's used by urban riders frequently, not really a light-feeling rim.

    I would again say to go with ovalized spokes instead of bladed, so you don't have to worry about getting them through the hub. (Although some bladed spokes will fit through the hub flange.)

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