Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    is full of it. charlisity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Eureka, CA Humboldt County
    My Bikes
    Giant Yukon, Trek 1000, Schwinn Super Sport Comp, World Sport and Le Tour IV, Haro Cyclocross
    Posts
    221
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Should I keep using this wheel?

    I was riding on a relatively smooth dirt road when my front wheel got a bad wobble for no apparent reason. I stopped and the tire looked like it wanted to taco but didn't. I was in the middle of nowhere and didn't feel like walking my bike for miles so I removed my front wheel, grasped it by the two "raised" areas and pressed the hub against a tree. It sprung into shape with just a tiny wobble to show anything had happened. I rode it slowly for about ten miles of dirt road to my truck.

    The shop couldn't find anything wrong besides the wobble that they removed by truing it. I am a total newbie and I'm wondering if this sort of thing happens to others and if they keep using their wheels after it does.

    I posted this in the cyclocross forum and it was suggested that I post it here for more insight.

  2. #2
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    DC / Maryland suburbs
    My Bikes
    Homebuilt tourer/commuter, modified-beyond-recognition 1990 Trek 1100, reasonably stock 2002-ish Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo
    Posts
    4,172
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How bad was the wobble? Generally if it's < 1 cm or so, and can be fixed by truing, it means there's nothing wrong with the rim.

    It sounds like you may have had "wound-up" spokes which unwound and loosened themselves... just a guess. Kind of mysterious really. If it's true now, keep checking it frequently for trueness (say every couple of rides) for a while and ensure that the problem doesn't return. If it stays true, doesn't crack, and is otherwise working fine after 10-20 more rides, you can probably forget about this incident.
    My bikes | Linux and Python stuff | Photo gallery

    Sheldon Brown, I miss you. Thanks for the advice, ideas, humor, and infectious enthusiasm for everything bikes...

  3. #3
    semifreddo amartuerer 'nother's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Northern CA
    My Bikes
    several
    Posts
    4,599
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ^^ I was thinking that too but I would be a tad concerned if the shop "just" trued it, e.g. just laterally but not round, or without checking spoke tension evenness...which would expose deeper problems. But yeah, if they were able to true/round it with reasonably even spoke tension, it's probably fine, no worries.
    Can you pass the test?
    Yield to Life.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,950
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    One thing you could try would be to check every spoke with a tensiometer to see how close to equal they all are. alternatively you can try the musical plucking system to see if they all sound about the same.

    Assuming you want to fix it yourself and don't have any special tools, try this:

    1. Loosen every spoke until you have exactly 1 spoke thread showing. That'll take all of the tension off of the wheel but, assuming the spokes are all the same length, they'll be equal.
    2. Now spin the wheel. If you're seeing a lot of side-to-side wobbling, more than 1 per revolution, that means that your rim is bent. If that's the case, your best bet is probably to replace the rim with a new straight one.
    3. If the rim looks pretty straight, tighten each spoke 1/2 turn at a time and go around the wheel multiple times to slooowly bring the wheel back up to tension. Any time that you save by hurrying at this stage you'll pay back (with interest) during final trueing. When you think that the tension feels about right, go around the wheel squeezing parallel pairs of spokes together to set the elbows and nipples. Do a final trueing on the bike by tightening and loosening opposing pairs of spokes an equal amount and you'll be good-to-go.

  5. #5
    ride, paint, ride simplify's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    San Diego
    My Bikes
    Cannondale R300 Caad2
    Posts
    1,202
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by charlisity
    I was riding on a relatively smooth dirt road when my front wheel got a bad wobble for no apparent reason. I stopped and the tire looked like it wanted to taco but didn't.
    This sounds a little like maybe the wheel might have been overtensioned. Jobst Brandt talks about how a wheel that is teetering on the brink of implosion due to overtensioning, will take on a potato-chip shape. The tension on this wheel should *definitely* be checked carefully, as mentioned above.
    No car. No TV. Three bikes.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Oklahoma
    My Bikes
    Trek 5500, Colnago C-50
    Posts
    9,183
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sounds to me as if it was undertensioned (loose spokes), typical for new machine built wheels. On a local organized ride I came upon a young man with a new Trek, front wheel was so out-of-true that it would not turn inside the brake pads. I pulled out my Spokey wrench and did a rudimentary truing job and sent him on his way with a recommendation to take it back to the dealer for a complete tune-up, tensioning, and truing job.

    Al

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •