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Old 11-04-06, 10:02 PM   #1
damnable
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Sheepish question

Hello,
Someone earlier today mentioned that it might be an idea to fiddle a bit with the tilt of my saddle. I haven't touched anything to do with the saddle except the overall height since I bough it. He said it might be tilted too far up at the front. So I am asking for help since I am not really sure how to adjust it.

So, I had a look at the saddle and underneath there is a vertical bolt but it seems to only adjust it forwards and backwards as a whole, and not adjust the tilt. Am I missing something here? I don't know and couldn't find the model of the saddle but it is the basic Bontrager one that comes with most of the lower end Trek recreational MTBs.
Thanks
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Old 11-04-06, 10:15 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damnable
Hello,
Someone earlier today mentioned that it might be an idea to fiddle a bit with the tilt of my saddle. I haven't touched anything to do with the saddle except the overall height since I bough it. He said it might be tilted too far up at the front. So I am asking for help since I am not really sure how to adjust it.

So, I had a look at the saddle and underneath there is a vertical bolt but it seems to only adjust it forwards and backwards as a whole, and not adjust the tilt. Am I missing something here? I don't know and couldn't find the model of the saddle but it is the basic Bontrager one that comes with most of the lower end Trek recreational MTBs.
Thanks
That bolt holds two curved pieces together, one is the top of the seatpost, the other is the part that the saddle rails sit on. If you loosen the bolt enough you can move the upper part forward or backward to adjust the angle. The curved surfaces have teeth in them to keep them from slipping, so you may need to loosen the bolt a fair amount, and even lift the upper part to disengage the teeth.

See also my article on saddles and saddle adjustment:

http://sheldonbrown.com/saddles

Note, the bolt needs to be nice and tight to keep the parts from slipping. The threads of the bolt should have a coating of grease on them, and also the underside of the bolt head.

Sheldon "Laprade" Brown
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Old 11-05-06, 08:38 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
That bolt holds two curved pieces together, one is the top of the seatpost, the other is the part that the saddle rails sit on. If you loosen the bolt enough you can move the upper part forward or backward to adjust the angle. The curved surfaces have teeth in them to keep them from slipping, so you may need to loosen the bolt a fair amount, and even lift the upper part to disengage the teeth.

See also my article on saddles and saddle adjustment:

http://sheldonbrown.com/saddles

Note, the bolt needs to be nice and tight to keep the parts from slipping. The threads of the bolt should have a coating of grease on them, and also the underside of the bolt head.

Sheldon "Laprade" Brown
Code:
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|   A billion here, a couple of billion there --       |
|   first thing you know it adds up to be real money.  |
|                    --Sen. Everett McKinley Dirksen   |
+------------------------------------------------------+
YES!!! I get to expound on the master's advice!

If you have a problem with this adjustment, it's usually because the upper part of the clamp hasn't separated from the saddle rails. When that happens, it'll let you adjust the saddle tilt but, when you retighten the bolt, it'll go right back to where it was.
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Old 11-05-06, 10:27 AM   #4
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Also notice the position of the rails relative to the clamp so you know
what you are used to fore & aft. Often the rails are calibrated. When
you loosen the clamp it will move.
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Old 11-05-06, 10:49 AM   #5
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In terms of what tilt to aim for, most people seem to have their saddle dead level or very slightly tilted up at front. If it tilts down at front you tend to slide forward so the narrow part of the saddle digs into your crotch, and you put more pressure on your hands or wrists to hold you back. If it tilts slightly up at front, that helps keep you back on the wide part of the saddle where your ischial tuberosities (sit bones) can carry your weight. Too much uphill tilt and you start to crush "the boys".
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Old 11-05-06, 03:37 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cooker
In terms of what tilt to aim for, most people seem to have their saddle dead level or very slightly tilted up at front. If it tilts down at front you tend to slide forward so the narrow part of the saddle digs into your crotch, and you put more pressure on your hands or wrists to hold you back. If it tilts slightly up at front, that helps keep you back on the wide part of the saddle where your ischial tuberosities (sit bones) can carry your weight. Too much uphill tilt and you start to crush "the boys".
Not to be contrary but I like mine tilted a degree or 2 down . I have to have NO pressure on my prostate so I combine this with a split nose design Koobi. Otherwise after a couple of hours I will leak . Mind this is a very slight angle so I have no problems slipping down the seat.
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Old 11-05-06, 07:10 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by knewbike
Not to be contrary but I like mine tilted a degree or 2 down . I have to have NO pressure on my prostate so I combine this with a split nose design Koobi. Otherwise after a couple of hours I will leak . Mind this is a very slight angle so I have no problems slipping down the seat.
+1 I was thinking about during today's group ride. I'd just finished reading AGAIN as to how the nose of the saddle should be tilted up a bit. I'm not sure how everyone is built, but with just the slightest upward tilt of the seat, I'm miserable.
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Old 11-06-06, 07:31 PM   #8
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Thankyou Professor Brown and very helpful members. Adjusted it today and will take out a few times to see how it goes. From what I have read, most women seem to be better off with saddles other than the stock ones. (Yes, I am a woman, so I don't have to worry about "the boys", but that doesn't mean it doesn't get uncomfortable).

Last edited by damnable; 11-07-06 at 01:11 AM.
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Old 11-06-06, 11:13 PM   #9
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I'm so embarrassed.
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Old 11-07-06, 04:53 AM   #10
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I have my Brooks saddle leveled, but the nose of the saddle pointed ever so slightly to the left. This set up is quite comfortable. I'm not sure why, but maybe "Richard and The Boys" are kinda leaning to the right side of my anatomy.
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Old 11-07-06, 10:02 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cooker
In terms of what tilt to aim for, most people seem to have their saddle dead level or very slightly tilted up at front. If it tilts down at front you tend to slide forward so the narrow part of the saddle digs into your crotch, and you put more pressure on your hands or wrists to hold you back. If it tilts slightly up at front, that helps keep you back on the wide part of the saddle where your ischial tuberosities (sit bones) can carry your weight. Too much uphill tilt and you start to crush "the boys".
Adding... if you have a worn cut-out saddl the foam tends to break down. You may have to tip the saddle up slightly to keep yourself from sliding forward.
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Old 11-08-06, 01:43 AM   #12
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I'm so embarrassed.
Don't worry, it's the thought that counts.
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Old 11-08-06, 08:18 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djaredb
I have my Brooks saddle leveled, but the nose of the saddle pointed ever so slightly to the left. This set up is quite comfortable. I'm not sure why, but maybe "Richard and The Boys" are kinda leaning to the right side of my anatomy.
Jokers to left of me, jokers to the right....here I am, stuck in the middle with you.
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