Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-06-06, 01:51 AM   #1
womble
No longer in Wimbledon...
Thread Starter
 
womble's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Hong Kong
Bikes:
Posts: 867
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What's a floating brake?

I've been trying to figure this out for a while now- what does it mean when a disc brake is referred to as "floating"? And what are they like compared to designs which don't "float"?
womble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-06, 02:57 AM   #2
wethepeople
Long haired freak.
 
wethepeople's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Still stuck in hell.
Bikes: 2011 SE Old Man Flyer.
Posts: 6,281
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A break that isnt mounted directly to the frame, instead it is on a pivot.

All they do is prevent break jack and look cool.

Watch this: http://www.therapycomponents.com/FLOATING%20BRAKE.htm
__________________

"the bus came by and I got on, that's when it all began...there was Cowboy Neal at the wheel of a bus to never-ever land."

wethepeople is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-06, 10:30 AM   #3
Ray Dockrey
Senior Member
 
Ray Dockrey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Mustang, OK
Bikes:
Posts: 728
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think what you are talking about is a floating caliper. On a normal single piston fixed caliper when you squeeze the brake lever the piston pushes against the rotor and then pushes the rotor against the opposite brake pad. On a floating caliper the piston pushes against the rotor. The force then slides the caliper over so the opposite pad can hit the rotor. So basically the caliper is floating over the rotor. This is the way most car brakes work.
Ray Dockrey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-06, 10:41 AM   #4
San Rensho 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 5,559
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
On motorcycles, a floating brake is a floating disc. Its loosely held to the hub by rivets. You grab it and you can move it around.
__________________
Il faut de l'audace, encore de l'audace, toujours de l'audace

1980 3Rensho-- 1975 Raleigh Sprite 3spd
1990s Raleigh M20 MTB--2007 Windsor Hour (track)
1988 Ducati 750 F1
San Rensho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-06, 12:18 AM   #5
womble
No longer in Wimbledon...
Thread Starter
 
womble's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Hong Kong
Bikes:
Posts: 867
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Heh- three different replies and three different answers

And the weird thing is, I'm sure each one is right.
womble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-06, 12:52 AM   #6
well biked 
biked well
 
well biked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 7,123
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
A full-suspension frame with a floating disc brake assembly has a separate brake arm that "floats", allowing the brake to be less affected by the bike's suspension action. As far as I know, this type of design is used only on longer travel bikes, so that the braking action is smoother and not as affected by the long travel rear suspension.........btw, womble, is your moniker based on the beautiful Womble Trail in West-Central Arkansas? I've ridden that trail end-to-end many times. Beautiful views!

Last edited by well biked; 11-07-06 at 01:08 AM.
well biked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-06, 01:22 AM   #7
khuon
DEADBEEF
 
khuon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Catching his breath alongside a road near Seattle, WA USA
Bikes: 1999 K2 OzM, 2001 Aegis Aro Svelte
Posts: 12,242
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by well biked
A full-suspension frame with a floating disc brake assembly has a separate brake arm that "floats", allowing the brake to be less affected by the bike's suspension action. As far as I know, this type of design is used only on longer travel bikes, so that the braking action is smoother and not as affected by the long travel rear suspension.
Floating brakes assemblies also tend to be used on single-pivot designs because braking forces can jack the suspension due to the limited availability for locating the pivot that will allow the suspension to remain active for real hits yet cancel out both pedal-induced bobbing and brake-jack... especially with disc-brakes.

This guy fabricated an awesome floating brake arm for his K2 OzM (retrofitted with an aluminum swingarm).

__________________
1999 K2 OzM 2001 Aegis Aro Svelte
"Be liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send." -- Jon Postel, RFC1122
khuon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:10 AM.