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  1. #1
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    Front fork question

    Junior Member

    Join Date: Oct 2006

    Hi, I have a GT timberline that is around five years old. It has a cromoly frame and I have upgraded all the components and converted it into a drop bar commuter bike. I'm very happy with the way it all turned out with the exception of the low end suspension fork that originally came with it. It makes the ride mushy. The problem is that it's set up with direct pull brakes and 26 in wheels. I want to keep the brakes because the brake levers that I bought to make direct pull brakes usable with drop bar levers are new and weren't particularly inexpensive. What I'd like is to find a non suspension fork set up for direct pull brakes and 26 inch wheels that won't change the trail component too much. Oh, it's a 1 1/8 threaded headset as well. I'm not asking too much here, am I? Does anyone have an idea that could help. Thanks very much in advance for your responses.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    1982 Bianchi Superleggera (restored with NOS campagnolo components), 1987 Bianchi Campione Del Mundo, 1995 Bianchi Denali (M900/950 XTR components, viscous cycles rigid fork, mavic ceramics), 1996 Specialized Hardrock (winter beater, 8 speed XT group
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    You just need a suspension "corrected" rigid fork, not hard to find for 1 1/8 steer tubes.

  3. #3
    cab horn
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    Nashbar, for example has one.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  4. #4
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    What tonyt said -- a "normal" rigid fork will change the geometry and make your bike really twitchy.

  5. #5

  6. #6
    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    The OP's current fork is threaded, though, so that's going to complicate things if he converts to threadless...........If you do convert to threadless, check and make sure the fork you get is suspension corrected for something like an 80mm travel fork (I'm assuming your "low end suspension fork" has 3" of travel or less). I think the Surly 1 x 1 would be hard to beat for that. At least one of the Nashbar suspension corrected forks I've seen lately is way too long for the typical short travel fork, it's suspension corrected for something like a 5" travel fork. I don't see it on their website right now, though-

  7. #7
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    Thank you all for your responses. I'll look into them.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    If you want a relatively nice (but inexpensive) chromoly fork to match your chromoly frame, just pick up a Tange Rigid Mountain Fork in the suspension corrected version.

    I have the Tange on my commuter mountain bike. It's straight-gauge chromoly tubing. About 2 lbs. Pretty much bomb-proof for commuting or XC riding. Inexpensive, too.


    Some options for you (from $45 to $315):

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/sub/1...ks.aspx?s=1618

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