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Old 11-28-06, 09:09 PM   #1
redden
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Derailer hanger

On my comute home tonight my derailer hanger snapped. It looks like it's a replaceable part. The bike is a 2002 Specialized Allez with 7000+ miles on it. Is it replaceable and is it easy to do?

thanks
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Old 11-28-06, 09:09 PM   #2
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It is replacable, but have a shop do the job to make sure the alignment is correct.
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Old 11-30-06, 06:14 AM   #3
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The shop wasn't interested in replacing it, they just sold me the new hanger. Only one small bolt holds it. The chain was the most difficult part. Up and running again
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Old 11-30-06, 07:06 AM   #4
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Find another shop.
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Old 11-30-06, 07:10 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redden
The shop wasn't interested in replacing it, they just sold me the new hanger.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDan
Find another shop.
ditto
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Old 11-30-06, 07:14 AM   #6
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for real find another shop any shop that turns you away is not a shop you want to support unless you have a high end frame and bought it somewhere else, then I would turn you away only if your frame looked bent, because staightening the frame weakens it. If you spent lots of money somewhere else and brought it to me for something like that I would not want to be held liable. My suggestion would be to return to the place of purchase for the repair.
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Old 11-30-06, 04:44 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDan
Find another shop.
I wouldn't be quite so hasty. His shop actually had the derailleur hanger that he needed in stock. That has to be 1 in a thousand. And you're saying "Find another shop."?
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Old 11-30-06, 06:07 PM   #8
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I wouldn't be quite so hasty. His shop actually had the derailleur hanger that he needed in stock. That has to be 1 in a thousand. And you're saying "Find another shop."?
A shop can stock all the parts it wants to. Crappy service is inexcusable. Even if the OP didn't buy his bike there, installing it and making sure it was straight is something they should have offered at a minimum. How many home mechaincs have a derailer alignment tool? A competant shop does want return busniess and good word of mouth advertsing. Refusing to do a repair won't achieve that either.
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Old 11-30-06, 08:04 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDan
A shop can stock all the parts it wants to. Crappy service is inexcusable. Even if the OP didn't buy his bike there, installing it and making sure it was straight is something they should have offered at a minimum. How many home mechaincs have a derailer alignment tool? A competant shop does want return busniess and good word of mouth advertsing. Refusing to do a repair won't achieve that either.
I understand all that. On the other hand, good intentions won't get you a derailleur hanger on a Friday night.
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Old 11-30-06, 08:36 PM   #10
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Funny, my take on it was that it was nice they didn't try to turn it into a big repair bill. The install was very easy and I simply used a straightedge to check alignment. It all seemed very straight forward. Of course I've never done this type of repair before. On the ride home I noticed a huge difference climbing. On Sepulveda where I used to fight for 14-15mph I was hitting 19. At high speed there no noticeable difference. Thought that was strange. Maybe because the derailer is under greater strain with the larger sprockets and went out of alignment in the climbing gears?
I prefer doing my own repairs and the shop knows that. My impression of the shop was that they are straight shooters and honest. They have always been very helpful.
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Old 11-30-06, 11:08 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redden
Funny, my take on it was that it was nice they didn't try to turn it into a big repair bill. The install was very easy and I simply used a straightedge to check alignment. It all seemed very straight forward. Of course I've never done this type of repair before. On the ride home I noticed a huge difference climbing. On Sepulveda where I used to fight for 14-15mph I was hitting 19. At high speed there no noticeable difference. Thought that was strange. Maybe because the derailer is under greater strain with the larger sprockets and went out of alignment in the climbing gears?
I prefer doing my own repairs and the shop knows that. My impression of the shop was that they are straight shooters and honest. They have always been very helpful.
It's nice that you could (and did) handle the R&R yourself, but the bottom line is this is not a difficult repair, and if your LBS was not interested in doing whatever was necessary to get your bike back in shape they were not doing their job.

BTW: a straightedge is not the same as a dropout alignment tool. I'm glad that your repair worked out, but I think someone needs to have a talk with the owner of your shop.

FWIW: I live in L.A. too; what shop are we talking about?
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Old 11-30-06, 11:15 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
On the other hand, good intentions won't get you a derailleur hanger on a Friday night.
Now that's a good quote.
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Old 11-30-06, 11:55 PM   #13
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I just broke a hanger today, I know there are many varieties of them.. is this something a LBS should have in stock or should I expect it to have to be ordered?
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Old 12-01-06, 12:39 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDan
A shop can stock all the parts it wants to.

I'm pretty sure that any Business 101 course will teach you that too much inventory is not good business.
A good shop will stock inventory that will get sold at, or near, retail price. Sensible inventory for a bike shop is things like consumables (chains, cassettes, tires, tubes, cables & housing, and a few other components), soft goods, and accessories. Selling parts and inventory that is not moving will almost always be at a loss. A hallmark of a great business is having just enough inventory to get the job done in a reasonable period. In the bike world, that period is about a week. And, in a week, there are not many parts you can't get from a big distributor like QBP. A good business lets the distributors bear the cost of warehousing large inventories.

I agree that there is no excuse for poor service. Part of good service is giving the customer a realistic estimate of how long it will take to get parts and then make sure and order them promptly. People don't like to hear that repairs are two weeks out, but if you want to really annoy them then tell them at the end of that two weeks that their parts are not in yet. Good service includes letting the customer know that there is a delay in getting the repair parts (i.e. it did not show up within a week, or whatever the expected delivery was).

As someone pointed out, there are many, many different derailleur hangers. For a shop to stock them all would be silly, from a business viewpoint.


While I agree with a lot of what you say, DieselDan, I have to totally disagree with your statement that shops can "stock all the parts they want to". It just does not work that way.
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Old 12-01-06, 12:44 AM   #15
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I just broke a hanger today, I know there are many varieties of them.. is this something a LBS should have in stock or should I expect it to have to be ordered?
Most cable hangers will need to be ordered by all but the biggest bike shops. If a shop has your specific hanger, then you lucked out. For people that want to do their own fix, you can find just about any hanger at:

http://www.derailleurhanger.com
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Old 12-01-06, 01:07 AM   #16
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I need a marin #9 aka a wheels manufacturing #73 and if your going by deraillier hangers.com a #77 with a quickness.. I see it will be fun phoning shops tomorrow.
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Old 12-01-06, 06:17 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmfnla
It's nice that you could (and did) handle the R&R yourself, but the bottom line is this is not a difficult repair, and if your LBS was not interested in doing whatever was necessary to get your bike back in shape they were not doing their job.

BTW: a straightedge is not the same as a dropout alignment tool. I'm glad that your repair worked out, but I think someone needs to have a talk with the owner of your shop.

FWIW: I live in L.A. too; what shop are we talking about?
I looked at dropout alignment tools. It looks like it's designed for to check the frame dropout alignment, Park has a Derailleur Hanger Alignment Gauge. Is that the tool your talking about?

The shop is Wheel World on Ventura Blvd.
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Old 12-01-06, 08:20 AM   #18
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A straight edge won't account for dishing. Some hangers aren't a straight piece, but I'm certain an Allez of your vintage is.
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Old 12-01-06, 08:27 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade168
Most cable hangers will need to be ordered by all but the biggest bike shops. If a shop has your specific hanger, then you lucked out. For people that want to do their own fix, you can find just about any hanger at:

http://www.derailleurhanger.com
If it was my bike, I'd buy two.
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Old 12-01-06, 10:25 PM   #20
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I ordered 2 ... the LBS had a bucket of hangers, but none for my bike Doesn't help that the nearest Marin dealer is now like 150 miles away. looks like I'm waiting till Wednesday for my order to come in.

I'm not checking frame alignment I'm just slapping one on my bike.. thought the whole reason for a replaceable hanger was just that.

as long as the wheel still fits.. I'm just going to slap it on.. I also have to replace a shift cable that was mangled.

Is there any problem with just slapping it on?
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Old 12-02-06, 08:57 AM   #21
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good thing it wasn't your derailleur hanger because then you would have been screwed
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Old 12-02-06, 09:15 AM   #22
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as long as the wheel still fits.. I'm just going to slap it on.. I also have to replace a shift cable that was mangled.

Is there any problem with just slapping it on?
Depends. The more cogs that you have on your cassette the more particular they are about having the derailleur hanger slignment spot-on. If it was my bike I'd slap it on and see how well the shifting indexes. If you're not happy you can always have a shop align the hanger later.
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Old 12-02-06, 09:57 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade168
I'm pretty sure that any Business 101 course will teach you that too much inventory is not good business.
A good shop will stock inventory that will get sold at, or near, retail price. Sensible inventory for a bike shop is things like consumables (chains, cassettes, tires, tubes, cables & housing, and a few other components), soft goods, and accessories. Selling parts and inventory that is not moving will almost always be at a loss. A hallmark of a great business is having just enough inventory to get the job done in a reasonable period. In the bike world, that period is about a week. And, in a week, there are not many parts you can't get from a big distributor like QBP. A good business lets the distributors bear the cost of warehousing large inventories.

I agree that there is no excuse for poor service. Part of good service is giving the customer a realistic estimate of how long it will take to get parts and then make sure and order them promptly. People don't like to hear that repairs are two weeks out, but if you want to really annoy them then tell them at the end of that two weeks that their parts are not in yet. Good service includes letting the customer know that there is a delay in getting the repair parts (i.e. it did not show up within a week, or whatever the expected delivery was).

As someone pointed out, there are many, many different derailleur hangers. For a shop to stock them all would be silly, from a business viewpoint.


While I agree with a lot of what you say, DieselDan, I have to totally disagree with your statement that shops can "stock all the parts they want to". It just does not work that way.
Here we go again!
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Old 12-03-06, 06:36 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redden
I looked at dropout alignment tools. It looks like it's designed for to check the frame dropout alignment, Park has a Derailleur Hanger Alignment Gauge. Is that the tool your talking about?

It is; thanks for pointing that out

The shop is Wheel World on Ventura Blvd.
Is that the little shop near Woodman? If so, I've stopped in there to look but never dealt with them before; now I'm glad.
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Old 12-03-06, 06:39 PM   #25
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i would have offered to replace it...takes all of 10 min.
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