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  1. #1
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    Need recommendations for Truing stand and accessories

    After debating what gift to get myself this holiday season, I am in the market for a truing stand and accessories. I don't build wheels and am not expecting to in the near future, but would like to get the highest quality for what I can afford. The budget I am looking at is around $100, give or take $15 (and I love saving money with coupons if possible). Everything has to be bought at the same online retailer too. Right now, the Park PT-TS8 for $90 looks good and something that will work well if I decide to start building my own wheels. I was thinking about a dish tool, but from everything I have read here, flipping the wheel in the stand accomplishes the same thing. A decent spoke wrench probably won't cost more than $10. Is there anything I am missing or I should look into getting?

  2. #2
    don't try this at home. rm -rf's Avatar
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    I have this Park tension meter tool, and this truing stand. The stand works good, and is cheaper than the tool. I wouldn't be able to build or true wheels without the tool to monitor the tension. Take the tire off before you true the wheel.

  3. #3
    Decrepit Member Scooper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rm -rf
    I have this Park tension meter tool, and this truing stand. The stand works good, and is cheaper than the tool. I wouldn't be able to build or true wheels without the tool to monitor the tension. Take the tire off before you true the wheel.
    I use exactly the same truing stand and the Park TM-1 tension meter, and have nothing but good things to say about both. I also have a dishing tool, but the OP is correct; you don't really need one.

    Last edited by Scooper; 12-09-06 at 12:17 PM.
    - Stan

  4. #4
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    I beg to differ from the majority of responders.. Any decent trueing stad will suffice(I use a 20 year old Minoura that "does the job".. YES to a dishing tool, they"re cheap and actually make wheel building/trueing considerably more effective..(even new bikes come with wheels that might be true but way off center.. affecting drive trains, brakes ,etc. A simple dishing tool is worth it... more than a tension tool..I don"t use one... Technique, common sense, is far more effective..Feel The Tensions..your hands are the best tools... (tight, but not too tight.. a branch that doesn"t flex will break quickly).. Trueing,dishing, lateral manual tension (no tools required for that one), repeat til its perfect..you"ll have some good wheels.

  5. #5
    me have long head tube TallRider's Avatar
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    I use the Performance truing stand pictured above, which I bought on sale for $40. Even when I worked at a shop and had dishing tool access, I just flipped the wheel around in the stand to see how much difference there was. So I don't think you much need a dishing tool.
    I also don't use a tension tool, options instead to work by feel and by tensioning spokes by ear. The link was recommended by Sheldon Brown. (This method may not work for those without a musical ear or the ability to carry a tune.) I think a tensionmeter probably IS worth having, but it's not that big of a deal and I've not felt like paying the $50 yet.

  6. #6
    Bike Junkie roccobike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by timcupery
    I use the Performance truing stand pictured above, which I bought on sale for $40. Even when I worked at a shop and had dishing tool access, I just flipped the wheel around in the stand to see how much difference there was. So I don't think you much need a dishing tool.
    I also don't use a tension tool, options instead to work by feel and by .
    Tim, You talked me into it the other day. I just purchased the same truing stand, (same price), as in I purchased it 3 hours ago. Now to assemble it. I wonder if I should read the directions or just try wing like I do everything else. Hmmmmm.
    Roccobike BF Official Thread Terminator

  7. #7
    biciclista girona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YingYang
    After debating what gift to get myself this holiday season, I am in the market for a truing stand and accessories. I don't build wheels and am not expecting to in the near future, but would like to get the highest quality for what I can afford. The budget I am looking at is around $100, give or take $15 (and I love saving money with coupons if possible). Everything has to be bought at the same online retailer too. Right now, the Park PT-TS8 for $90 looks good and something that will work well if I decide to start building my own wheels. I was thinking about a dish tool, but from everything I have read here, flipping the wheel in the stand accomplishes the same thing. A decent spoke wrench probably won't cost more than $10. Is there anything I am missing or I should look into getting?
    I've used the PT-TS7 (previous model) and the Minoura truing stand similar to the Performace one. While the Park had a more solid feel to it, I much prefer the Minoura over the low end Park stand. Nicer Park truing stands are the standard though. I wonder how the Pedro's truing stand, uh hum, stands up to the Park.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    Be sure the spoke wrench fits the nipples snuggly, I use Spokey wrenches. I suppose the new "4-sided" Park wrenches work well but the earlier types didn't.

    Al

  9. #9
    Making a kilometer blurry waterrockets's Avatar
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    Get a TM-1 tensiometer and whatever truing stand fits the remaining budget (I'd just get the cheapest one you can find). 12 years ago I got a $35 Minoura stand. It's really flexible, and not well made, but it's easy to use, and the job it does is not difficult. I have hand-crafted many wheels on that stand, and it works just great -- I see no reason to spend more money unless you just want to.

    The TM-1 will be much more important to maintaining your wheels, and even prepping brand new pre-built wheels before riding them.

    A dish tool is nice, but you can get by just fine flipping your wheel around in the truing stand -- even a noodly one like mine. I did finally break down and built my own dish tool last year (took about 15 minutes, made from scrap plywood with my bandsaw). I got tired of taking the time to flip the wheel in the stand.

  10. #10
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    You should consider the Ultimate Pro truing stand as well. It can serve as a dishing tool so you won't require a separate tool for that. I quite like mine. It's available from Performance Bike for $59.99. If you add in some type of free shipping promotion and some type of discount it can be quite reasonably priced.

  11. #11
    otherwiseordinary lymbzero's Avatar
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    The predecessor to the PT-TS8 is great.
    It came with a dishing tool too!

    It's all black and made from really sturdy steel.
    I got mine for 75$ CAD

    It's not pro stand, but I've trued and built like 5 wheels on it since I got it this summer.
    I love it.

    You can probably find it sitting in a dusty corner of a LBS somewhere. OR even better, used.

  12. #12
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    Well, after reading everything, I think I will go along the lines of what waterrockets said about getting a tensiometer first and then using the remainder to get a truing stand. It will probably be either an Ultimate Pro or the Spin Doctor one. I am just waiting for a decent Performance coupon that might save me more than just shipping costs before I buy anything.

  13. #13
    Decrepit Member Scooper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YingYang
    Well, after reading everything, I think I will go along the lines of what waterrockets said about getting a tensiometer first and then using the remainder to get a truing stand. It will probably be either an Ultimate Pro or the Spin Doctor one. I am just waiting for a decent Performance coupon that might save me more than just shipping costs before I buy anything.
    That's smart. I'd also recommend downloading Roger Musson's e-book Wheel Building, 3rd Ed.. It's $9.00, but will easily save you more than that in aggrevation the first time you use it.
    - Stan

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