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Old 12-27-06, 06:20 PM   #1
vegas06
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Removing Seized Pedal from Crank

I have a set of Look Speedplay clips on my Canondale R500 road bike that I am trying to remove and switch to a different brand of clips (as I now use this bike for indoor training on my CyleOps Trainer).

I was able to get the right pedal off and put on the new right pedal.

However there doesn't seem to be any way to get the left pedal off as it's seems to be seized solid.

Normally I would be able to use an allen wrench and release it from the other side of the pedal. The problem is that the Look Speedplay pedals don't use any type of allen wrench screw, or a screw of any kind.

So does anyone have a way that I might be able to remove this pedal without having to take it to the bike shop?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
(Pedaless) Michael
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Old 12-27-06, 06:30 PM   #2
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It turns backwards to the right side because it is left hand threaded. Roger
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Old 12-27-06, 06:33 PM   #3
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Roger, thanks for the reply.
The problem is that it is sezied on solid. No matter which way I try to remove it.
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Old 12-27-06, 07:45 PM   #4
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Be sure you are turning it the correct way (clockwise from the non-drive side of the bike) and don't be afraid to use a mallet on the wrench handle. Use a lot of penetrating oil and let it soak for a while before trying the brute force approach. Applying alternate heat (a torch but gently) and cold may help break the bond too.

Just don't apply penetrating oil and then the torch or the heating might be a bit overdone.
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Old 12-27-06, 07:47 PM   #5
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Try this

Try this.
Put as long a wrench as you can fit on it. Position the wrench so it is parallel with the ground-more or less-and the crankarm is pointing about 2 oclock.
It helps if you have a second set of hands.
Get a hammer ,and hit the wrench as far out on the handle as possible. Strike it a sharp blow-use a heavy hammer.You don't really have to wind up to hit it-especially if you use a heavy hammer.You have to pretension the wrench before hitting it-by pretensioning it,I mean be pressing on it, so it isn't going to move relative to the pedal once you hit it.You can also use a 2x4 as your hammer. Be careful not to hit the frame.
I would spray the offending pedal spindle with penetrating oil first, and I would tap it with something metal several times in the 30 minutes before doing the above.The idea is to break up and corrosion that is binding the threads,so you have to tap,tap,tap metal to metal to transmit the vibrations to the threads.
An extra set of hands is very important while doing this.Someone has to hold the hammer,wrench, and crankarms in place while someone hits it.
Some pretty smart mechanics suggest actually giving it a tiny-tiny-hit in the wrong direction before going in the correct direction.
In any case,do the penetrating oil(anything that clains to be penetrating oil is fine-WD 40 is much better than nothing,and any oil is better than nothing-just give it time to work its way into the threads-at least 30 minutes-more is better)) and tap,tap tap for at least 30 minutes before the big,sharp rap.
Luck,
Charlie
PS-I have mis turned pedals and BB many times-most folks who aren't bike mechanics have. You might have tightened it a bit by going the wrong way initially.A sharp rap-or several-will work-100%.Careful of the frame!! Wear leather gloves if you are holding the wrench(takes the sting out if the hammer holder misses)!!
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Old 12-27-06, 09:25 PM   #6
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http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/stuck-pedals.html
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Old 12-27-06, 10:13 PM   #7
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Time to get a bigass pipe to go on the end of your pedal wrench
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Old 12-28-06, 09:04 AM   #8
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Torch to area, followed by PB Blaster to soak in, tap, long pipe on your wrench.
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Old 12-28-06, 09:21 AM   #9
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I second the Pulp Fiction aproach. get medieval on the crank with "a couple a pipe hitting n****** with a blow torch". Should do the trick.
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Old 12-28-06, 10:47 AM   #10
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Ammonia is the release agent for al/steel. Let soak in. Heat while you are wrenching to expand the aluminum - boiling water should be sufficient and wont risk damaging the crank.
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Old 12-28-06, 10:50 AM   #11
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Has anybody tried heating up the aluminum crank like Sheldon suggests? I have a steel pedal bolt frozen into an aluminum crank and nothing is working. I soaked in ammonia - put super power cranking, banging. The works. I finally rebuilt the pedal in frustration.

How about the heated crank method? Any known successes out there?
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Old 12-28-06, 11:03 AM   #12
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Seized pedals is why you should grease the threads before installing pedals !
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Old 12-28-06, 11:15 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.Deltron
Seized pedals is why you should grease the threads before installing pedals !
You can say that again! The problem is that we end up with bikes assembled by others without this wisdom.
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Old 12-28-06, 11:18 AM   #14
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Actually the threads were greased when the pedals were put on. But that was 3-4 years ago.
So grease wasn't an issue, but wheather, wear, and most likely, I put the pedal on way too tight is most likely the culprit.

Last edited by vegas06; 12-28-06 at 12:30 PM.
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Old 12-28-06, 11:39 AM   #15
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Bashing the wrench with a mallet may work but it is a bit harsh on lightweight qeuipment.
I use some gentle foot force on a long wrench.
Place chain in lowest gear.
Position the non-drive crank forward/up at 10:00
Apply the wrench rear-up at 2:00.
Apply both brakes.
Put foot onto wrench and tranfer weight. Bounch up and down with care.
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Old 12-28-06, 01:28 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelW
Bashing the wrench with a mallet may work but it is a bit harsh on lightweight qeuipment.
I use some gentle foot force on a long wrench.
Place chain in lowest gear.
Position the non-drive crank forward/up at 10:00
Apply the wrench rear-up at 2:00.
Apply both brakes.
Put foot onto wrench and tranfer weight. Bounch up and down with care.
I have snapped two wrenches with the above described technique.
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Old 12-29-06, 10:51 AM   #17
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Thanks to everyone for their suggestions.
1. I sprayed some WD40 on the pedal and let it set in overnight.
2. Then I placed the bike in the lowest gear setting
3. used my pedal wrench
4. Used thinsulate gloves to protect my hands

and walla was able remove the pedal with mild force.
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Old 12-29-06, 11:31 AM   #18
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I was told that if you are going to stand on the wrench it's a good idea to put something under the pedal to take the pressure so you don't damage the bottom bracket. Mine were in pretty tight as well.
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Old 12-30-06, 08:57 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0502

Thanks for posting this link, neal0502. I tried it and it worked swell. In fact, I posted an gratitude thread for Sheldon on this advise.

I have been working on a stuck pedal for over two years - each time giving up and rebuilding the ever deteriorating pedal bearings. Thanks to Sheldon's advise of heating the crank, the pedal is now off and a new one is in it's place.

Oh, and by the way, I did GREASE THE PEDAL BOLT before putting it on the crank arm!
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Old 04-11-10, 06:35 AM   #20
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Hammer wasn't helping, we just heated up the end of the pedal/crank with a kitchen blow torch for a minute and it came off in a second! Sweet.
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Old 03-05-12, 11:32 PM   #21
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I tried about 5 different ways.. before I used a blowtorch for less then a min can off like nothing.. Really Prob the only way to get one off
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Old 03-06-12, 12:00 AM   #22
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Whoa. Two one-hit-wonder zombie thread bumps?

For the sake of future googlers, this thread was started in '06

I always soak it in PB blaster, use a length of pipe and rely on the old "redneck impact" method- whack the crap out of the wrench, sharp force is more effective than steady force for things like this. (PB blaster optional, especially if they're alloy cranks)
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Old 03-06-12, 12:29 PM   #23
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Would anti-seize compound be a better choice than grease?
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Old 03-06-12, 01:07 PM   #24
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Quote:
The problem is that we end up with bikes assembled by others
which is why I re assemble and QC the build up, with every Bike I get, myself,
as soon as possible.


Take the crank arm off the bike, and put it in the bench vise..
so you can really 'lean' on it. cheater pipe etc.

Last edited by fietsbob; 03-06-12 at 01:58 PM.
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Old 03-06-12, 01:14 PM   #25
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Nobody has mentioned gaining some extra leverage. I had a similar problem with a crankarm that didn't want to come off. I used some penetrating oil first, and let it soak in for a few minutes (previously mentioned). I then took a steel seatpost and used about 20 zip ties to securely attach it to my removal tool, making for a longer lever. That did the trick. I almost had to do it with the pedals, but the previously mentioned hammer approach worked for that.
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