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Old 01-02-07, 06:30 AM   #1
lutonblue
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Replace external cables

Hi,

I have external cables on my bike. Is it possible to replace these with fully enclosed cables as they are sticking due to rust?

Thanks
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Old 01-02-07, 06:32 AM   #2
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You can, but friction will create a bigger problem for you. Just change the cables.
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Old 01-02-07, 08:15 AM   #3
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Buy stainless steel cables. These cost slightly more but will resist rusting.

Whether you can use fully housed cables depends on the type and location of the cable stops on the bike frame. If your frame is set up for partially exposed inner wires (most current frames are) you would have to have different cable guides fitted and this is a major job as it requires both removing and fitting new guides plus at least a partial repaint.
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Old 01-02-07, 11:43 AM   #4
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Yes it's possible.

You can run cable housing from the brake levers or shifters to the brake or derailers. Secure them to the frame using zip ties. The added friction can be mitigated by dripping some chain lube into the housing before assembly.
You'll still have the old cable stops, you can leave them there, or grind them off and repaint.
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Old 01-02-07, 12:50 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stacey
You can, but friction will create a bigger problem for you. Just change the cables.
+1
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Old 01-02-07, 02:48 PM   #6
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You are better off with exposed cables, as others have suggested.
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Old 01-02-07, 04:26 PM   #7
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Be sure to replace the cable housings when you replace the cables. I use silicone doorlock grease on the new cables when they are installed.

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Old 01-03-07, 03:14 PM   #8
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I agree with Matimeo, but actually, if your cables just show surface rust but work well and have no frayed strands (typically in the shifter or brake lever), I would suggest that you simply clean them.

Release the tension in the cable and use a plastic scrubber with Mr. Clean (or similar) to scrub the rust away. Then dry them and wipe them with a tiny bit of grease. Wipe that grease off with a wee bit of WD-40, and voilà, you'll have rust-protected cables and will keep your clothes clean.

This doesn't last for ever, but my experience shows that if I wipe the cables 1-2 per year with WD-40, they remain rust free. This is true both for stainless steel and other cables, though the latter tend to become dull quickly. And I'm riding year round: rain, snow or shine.
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