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Old 01-19-07, 12:24 PM   #1
seriouslysilly
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SPD pedal adapters --> Are they good?

I'm going to dive in and get my 1st clipless shoe & pedals.

I'm not sure whether I should get a platform/spd combination or just the double-sided SPD (ex. SPD-647).
I've been reading comments that using regular shoes on the double sided spd pedals can be uncomfortable after a while.
I'm a little hesitant in getting the one sided platform and other side SPD because of having to look down to see which side is up.

I then cam across this auction on eBay. If i get regular SPD pedals, will these adapters work for when I want to use regular shoes?

The reason I ask is because I also want to use my bike on my way to do other things (ex. play basketball/tennis, grocery shopping, errands). It's not really convenient for me to have to bring an extra pair of shoes or to make unnecessary noices while in the store.

Here's the link

thanks!
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Old 01-19-07, 12:31 PM   #2
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I'd ask the seller if they are plastic or Metal... Plastic ones come on some pedals included with bikes and are just meant for test riding purpouses- they'll fall apart under real riding.
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Old 01-19-07, 12:33 PM   #3
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Don't bother with the plastic ones for sure. I have some that I was never even able to click in.
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Old 01-19-07, 12:37 PM   #4
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I've had very good luck with the platform/spd combination pedals. I find them quite comfortable to use when riding with street shoes. I had ordinary SPD pedals before these, but then switched to combo pedals on my commuter bike.

It's true that having the SPD mechanism on one side makes it a little harder to clip in at first. However, you'll quickly learn to flip the pedal and clip in almost without thinking.

On the other hand, the adapters are certainly an option, though I've heard mixed reviews of how durable/reliable they are. You might want to get Nashbar's version, which is just as cheap as the one on eBay but sold by a reputable company: http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...%20Accessories. And you can combine shipping if you're going to be buying other stuff from them.

If you decide to go with the combo pedals, Performance has a really excellent deal on their Campus pedals right now: http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...e.cfm?SKU=2275. For $25 it's just as good quality as the $75 Shimano version in my opinion. The Nashbar Rodeo pedals are a shoddier version, but they've been doing quite well for me over about 1 year of use.
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Old 01-19-07, 12:39 PM   #5
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Have you thought about these?



I have the same gizmos for my Look-compatible pedals and they work pretty well. I like the fact that they have toe clips.

- Jeff
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Old 01-19-07, 01:07 PM   #6
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I use the plastic ones and they work just fine...for what I do with them (I'm rarely riding without my SPD shoes). I had a pair of the metal ones, and they were TERRIBLE...very slippery and hard to flip over to the platform side....

One note though...these things are cheap, cheap, cheap. Most LBS will have them lying around for people to test ride bikes with... They're easy to find, and you shouldn't need to pay much for them (ie shipping might make these impractical as an E-Bay item).
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Old 01-19-07, 01:21 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moxfyre
On the other hand, the adapters are certainly an option, though I've heard mixed reviews of how durable/reliable they are. You might want to get Nashbar's version, which is just as cheap as the one on eBay but sold by a reputable company: http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...%20Accessories. And you can combine shipping if you're going to be buying other stuff from them.

If you decide to go with the combo pedals, Performance has a really excellent deal on their Campus pedals right now: http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...e.cfm?SKU=2275. For $25 it's just as good quality as the $75 Shimano version in my opinion. The Nashbar Rodeo pedals are a shoddier version, but they've been doing quite well for me over about 1 year of use.
Thanks for the comprehensive reply. I'm starting to lean on the combo pedals (one side/one side) rather than the double sided because of the metal pieces sticking out from the middle. I can just see myself slipping when pedaling through the neighborhood.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jsonnabend
Have you thought about these?



I have the same gizmos for my Look-compatible pedals and they work pretty well. I like the fact that they have toe clips.

- Jeff
Jeff, thanks for that info! I didn't even know they had adapters with toe clips. although i've never used toe clips before it seems promising. I'll have to borrow my brothe's toe clips and stick them on my platforms for the time being. I'll see how I like it.
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Old 01-19-07, 02:00 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seriouslysilly
Thanks for the comprehensive reply. I'm starting to lean on the combo pedals (one side/one side) rather than the double sided because of the metal pieces sticking out from the middle. I can just see myself slipping when pedaling through the neighborhood.

Jeff, thanks for that info! I didn't even know they had adapters with toe clips. although i've never used toe clips before it seems promising. I'll have to borrow my brothe's toe clips and stick them on my platforms for the time being. I'll see how I like it.
Glad to be convincing you

Here's one more thing: It sounds like you will basically be using the bike for the same things as me. Mostly planned rides and commuting where you don't mind wearing your bike shoes, but also the occasional quick errand or trip around the corner. The key here is that your desire to ride in street shoes may be spontaneous and unplanned. If you go with the adapters, then (a) you will always leave them clipped in, negating the advantage, or (b) you will always have to carry them around with you in case you want to use street shoes, or (c) you will forget them and not be able to use street shoes.

So, as I see it, the combo pedals are going to always be there when you need 'em, without having to worry about it. The single-sided clipless is, of course, the disadvantage... but not a big one at least for me.

You also mentioned the double-sided pedals being slippery. While I haven't found this to be too bad, I *do* like that the combo pedals have a platform on both sides. So when you're trying to clip in and miss slightly, your foot is still on a firm surface. Additionally, the platform distributes the weight of your foot better, so you don't get a sore spot.
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Old 01-19-07, 02:33 PM   #9
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I have both the Nashbar and the Performance with a pedal on one side and the SPD clip on the other. I like them just fine. The Performance one is cheaper.
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Old 01-19-07, 02:38 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reverborama
I have both the Nashbar and the Performance with a pedal on one side and the SPD clip on the other. I like them just fine. The Performance one is cheaper.
I've had both too. The Performance one is cheaper right now ($25), but I got the Nashbar ones for an astonishingly low $10 on sale.
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Old 01-19-07, 02:40 PM   #11
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moxfyre, being one of the most sensible posters on these boards, gives good advice. But you should know that there are many many who tried the double-sided SPD/platform and are vehemently opposed. Just saying. Do a search in the Commuter forum.
But I think we're all in agreement that those adapters are crap.
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Old 01-19-07, 02:46 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daredevil
Don't bother with the plastic ones for sure. I have some that I was never even able to click in.
Yeah, me too. Waste of five bucks. I ended up going with cheap Wellgo combo pedals. They do pretty well - I'm mostly commuting short distances on that bike right now, so I do a lot of riding in street shoes. When I do ride with my SPD shoes, they bind too tightly for my taste. It can be tough to get them to release. They also have no float to speak of. If I were riding with clipless shoes more often I would invest in either double-sided SPDs or the Shimano combo pedal (M324 I think), which should match my cleats better. For my present needs, the cheap Wellgos are great.

I've also rediscovered a love for cruising around on plain pedals, since I've been doing so much of it lately. You really can't go wrong with having both options! I only have one bike out of three with pure clipless pedals, and it gets fewer miles than my other two. To be fair, it hasn't really had a drivetrain since late October, but all the same...
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Old 01-19-07, 03:39 PM   #13
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I advise you not to use both toe-clips and clipless as they require totally different foot movements to get off the pedals. Use one or the other. Otherwise you will suddenly find you cant extract your feet from the pedals when you have to.
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Old 01-19-07, 04:05 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewP
I advise you not to use both toe-clips and clipless as they require totally different foot movements to get off the pedals. Use one or the other. Otherwise you will suddenly find you cant extract your feet from the pedals when you have to.
That's plain silly. If you twist your foot to the right/left with toe clips (as if you were clipless), your foot will pop right out. And that's only an issue if you forget what your riding -- which isn't likely to happen as they feel totally different.

The clip in platforms are great for running errands and such, but I wouldn't use them for 100 mile rides or anything. I've used mine for 20 mile round trips over the Brooklyn Bridge to the court houses. Not a problem there.

They are cheaply made, no doubt about that.

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Old 01-22-07, 09:02 AM   #15
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Those inserts that are on EBay work fine. there the same ones I use, LBS sold them to me for $15.00

I put them on a double sided SPD pedal they are still holding up well, and Im a clyde! 249

there seems to be very light weight snap on platforms for "test rides" and the ones like these/I have that are very very durable, tough as nails and sit real tight on the pedal (secure).


Now on the flip side if I were going to it again I would just get a pedal like the rodeo , campus ...

I had the two sided pedals and added the platforms for use at lunch time or home if I wated to run to store/take a quick ride without wearing cycling shoes.

"John"

Last edited by JOHN J; 01-23-07 at 08:05 AM.
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Old 01-22-07, 10:22 AM   #16
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thanks for the replies guys!

as of right now, i have the SPD-m540 - a double sided SPD. I'm thinking about keeping it instead of selling it. I just might get that clip-in platform for the time being and check it out. This way when I finally dive into clipless, i'll have it double-sided

+ I won't have to spend more $$ for the combo pedal
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Old 01-22-07, 10:45 AM   #17
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those Ebay ones are likely scam-boolie.

the ones pictured ( forgot the manufacturer) by jsonnabend work with an additional set of SPD cleats screwed to the bottoms.

Winwood DECKSTERS are metal platforms (no toeclip) that also require an additional SPD cleat, but provide what the OP is looking for, Winwood Decksters. available thru your LBS or somewhere online, i'd imagine.
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Old 01-22-07, 04:32 PM   #18
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nashbar has them


not bad at all.
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Old 01-25-07, 09:36 AM   #19
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those winwood decksters are terrible! VERY heavy and slippery.
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Old 01-25-07, 11:47 AM   #20
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Someone else may have mentioned these, but I did not see any specifics:

http://bike.shimano.com/catalog/cycl...=1169747041173

The Shimano PD-M324 pedals are, in my opinion, the best solution for someone who wants to ride alternately with either SPD clipless or plain street shoes. These pedals are very solid and everyone I've sold them to seems to love them. Just one caveat - not lightweight.

I have found that the clip-in platforms seem to come unclipped unexpectedly, and I know I'm not the only one who's experienced this. I've known some people who like them, but not many.
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Old 01-25-07, 12:26 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade168
Someone else may have mentioned these, but I did not see any specifics:

http://bike.shimano.com/catalog/cycl...=1169747041173

The Shimano PD-M324 pedals are, in my opinion, the best solution for someone who wants to ride alternately with either SPD clipless or plain street shoes. These pedals are very solid and everyone I've sold them to seems to love them. Just one caveat - not lightweight.
This type of combo pedals are definitely my option of choice. However, I would suggest the Performance Campus pedal as a much better value.

The Shimano PD-M324 cost about $75. The Performance Campus pedal is on sale for $25 right now, and they're quite high-quality, similar to the PD-M324. Sturdy, smooth cartridge bearings, decent finish. Also, they are 430g compared to 530g for the Shimano model.

Nashbar also makes a knockoff, the Nashbar Rodeo, but the bearings are cup-and-cone and come way overtightened. Otherwise they're good too. I got 'em for $10 so can't complain.
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Old 02-03-07, 03:23 AM   #22
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except fer the weight i have no complaint fer M324. i can even ride with my shoes with clip on the non-spd side of the pedal with ease. It is very useful for those learning to use clipless for the first time.
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Old 02-03-07, 07:44 AM   #23
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yeah, i'm still a bit torn.

i have an spd-m540 pedal (in box with cleats) on hand.

don't know whether to put this on ebay and eat the cost to get the m324
or
just get the adapter.

looking at the adapter, it doesn't look like it will grab the shoes much.
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