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  1. #1
    jackrussellsonabicycle Airwick's Avatar
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    Help with bicycle trailer

    Hello Mechanics,
    We purchased a Cycletote trailer that attaches to the seat post stem. Arrived today, gorgeous, looks like it will be perfect. The silver "tongue" that attaches to the seat stem is a tad too large. (They make different sizes - my bike is a 1975 Raleigh Sports with a narrow seat post.) Here's a link to the system: http://www.cycletote.com/frame_hitch.html

    I will be ordering the proper size but hope to get some training in pulling all of the gear. Any suggestions on something that might work in this situation on a temporary basis?

    Thanks in advance,
    Airwick

  2. #2
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Try some shims from Adams for their Trail-A-Bike. Another option would be aluminum can shims, which worked for Greg.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DieselDan
    Try some shims from Adams for their Trail-A-Bike. Another option would be aluminum can shims, which worked for Greg.
    Depending on how much too small it is...a wrap or two of duct tape with a section from a can would work. If it is close a wrap or two of can, if more than 1/8" I would use the tape then the can over the tape.

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  4. #4
    Scott n4zou's Avatar
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    Drop by a building supply store and look in the roofing section for aluminum sheet made for waterproofing corners and valleys. It's very thin and easily cut with scissors. Don't use your good scissors! A $1 store will have some suitable scissors. Just cut the aluminum the width you need and wrap around the post until you have a good tight clamping action. I use it as well for shimming between a handlebar and stem where the surfaces have become worn and will not hold properly. It's also handy for fixing a cut tire so you can get home. Cut a section wide enough to just cover the inside of the tire and about 3 inches long. Cover one side with duct tape overlapping the edges to keep the sharp edges from cutting the tube.

  5. #5
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    Any of the above, or part of an old tube.

    I have a cycletote too (5 years). Keep the screws that hold the arm to the carrier at least lubed but preferably anti-siezed. On of my bolts seized up last year and I had to drill it out. I only did a middling job of retapping and now I need to find someone to refill the hole and properly tap.

    Great trailer otherwise, really stands up to the abuse. If you will be doing hills with some frequency, the brake option would be nice. I don't have it, but if I did more hills I would want it.

    Bad part is that the tongue bolts are english. I have to carry an allen wrench just for those bolts. I run the tongue on one bike that has a slightly too small seatpost. The tongue loosens over a few miles. I have never had the tongue come loose when mounted on the appropriate sized post.

  6. #6
    jackrussellsonabicycle Airwick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by masiman
    Any of the above, or part of an old tube.

    I have a cycletote too (5 years). Keep the screws that hold the arm to the carrier at least lubed but preferably anti-siezed. On of my bolts seized up last year and I had to drill it out. I only did a middling job of retapping and now I need to find someone to refill the hole and properly tap.

    Great trailer otherwise, really stands up to the abuse. If you will be doing hills with some frequency, the brake option would be nice. I don't have it, but if I did more hills I would want it.

    Bad part is that the tongue bolts are english. I have to carry an allen wrench just for those bolts. I run the tongue on one bike that has a slightly too small seatpost. The tongue loosens over a few miles. I have never had the tongue come loose when mounted on the appropriate sized post.
    Thanks for the advice, everyone. I think I will try the old tube first since it is the easiest and quickest - I'll let you know how it works until new hitch arrives.

    Masiman, One question. This is the extended size doggy tote. She's beautiful but wondering how safe you feel it would be to tow across country with the two wheels and wide behind sticking out? I was thinking no problem for a lot of roads but made me nervous last night thinking about some of the roads we've come across on the Southern Tier.

    Airwick

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airwick
    Masiman, One question. This is the extended size doggy tote. She's beautiful but wondering how safe you feel it would be to tow across country with the two wheels and wide behind sticking out? I was thinking no problem for a lot of roads but made me nervous last night thinking about some of the roads we've come across on the Southern Tier.
    I have the family model and use it for my kids. I have only pulled on shorter (50mi or less) local or supported rides. In some ways I feel a little safer with the trailer. People tend to give you a little more space. Frankly, I would liken it to just starting to ride on the road. You are very nervous at first. Every car seems too close. After awhile you think you have a sense that you will be okay. You come to accept that if you are going to get hit, there is nothing you can do about it and it will very likely not be your fault. Again, I don't have to go out on narrow roads as you might encounter. A narrow road would not be so bad. A narrow road with traffic and/or blind corners/hills....that would be nerve wracking. I hardly ever ride with the flag. I would if I were doing open road riding.

    I really like that the trailer has 700c rims. If you are touring, it makes it alot easier if you have one size of tires and tubes for spares.

    I just looked at your website. Very nice! You tour on your enlish style bike? You just don't see that here. I think you will really appreciate the weight of the dogs moving off the rack and into the trailer. Although they may seem so much more removed from you than you are accustom. Send me a PM if you plan on riding to the Wash DC area. There are some pretty good trails that can get you through the heart of the city (at least east-west). Both my neighbors have Jack Russel's.
    Last edited by masiman; 02-09-07 at 10:29 AM.

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