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  1. #1
    A Serious Mountain Biker uphillbiker's Avatar
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    Friction in rear shifter...what to fix?

    Hi Guys,

    Could you please help me.

    I have a Garry Fisher Marlin with a Shimano Acera shifter and the Alivio rear derailleur. There is a LOT of friction for shifting down (shifting from "high gear" to "low gear") on the rear gear set and I having a lot of trouble diagnosing it. When I removed the chain and disconnected the cable, the neither the derailleur or the shifter seemed to have any friction. However, when the cable is connected, there is friction even without the chain. Trail riding (or anything when you're trying to get from high to low quickly) really sucks when you can't shift and just about break the lever trying to do so. Buying a new derailleur and shifter is not out of the question--whatever it takes to keep the bike moving. It's, of course, much better to be able to fix something--lube or whatever.

    Thank you a whole lot for the help guys.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    My guess is that you need a new shift cable and housing. The short section of cable housing that's adjacent to the rear derailleur is particularly problematic.

    I think that if you ever ride in the rain or through a puddle that the water runs down the shift cable and collects in the loop that's in that section of housing.

  3. #3
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    I agree with retro but would also add that the rear peice of housing by the rear der also takes alot more wear to the liner inside the housing because of the bend in it. cable is wearing through it quicker than other peices of housing.

  4. #4
    A Serious Mountain Biker uphillbiker's Avatar
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    Hi Guys,

    Thanks for the replies.

    I picked up some new housing at the bike shop today. He cut me a piece a couple inches longer, as the stock one seemed a bit short. The guy noticed it was quite kinked at the ends, which should have occured to me as a reason for having so much friction. It's also been through all sorts of water splashadge, rain etc. Should have changed it a long time ago.
    Last edited by uphillbiker; 02-10-07 at 03:16 PM.

  5. #5
    A Serious Mountain Biker uphillbiker's Avatar
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    I added the new housing/new cable and that made all the difference in the world. Now the bike shifts like a dream.

    Thank you for the suggestion guys.

  6. #6
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    Shifting..........

    Breaking down the shifing sequence is as easy as this. From the shifter through the first cable housing to the break where it fits into the first flange, hold the cable in your hand(after it is removed from the deraileur) and shift and feel for resistance. Then move down the cable until you get to the deraileur. I don't know whether or not you have new cables or whether they are universal or specific to index shifting systems but, this is what I would check. If what you are using are universal cables, rip those bad boys off and throw them away! Jagwire cables with deraileur ferrules could be the answer. Spiral type cable housings cause sloppy shifting, and cable binding. Once you cut those housings, you have to grind down the area where you cut so the cable does not rub. I went through 3 shifter cables with bar end shifters before I did this, yet it is still no guarantee. Just use caution

  7. #7
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    uphillbiker,

    Any modification of a device without having read the instruction manual is very dangerous.
    I suggest it's safer to check it out before action.

    C. -M. Hsu

  8. #8
    A Serious Mountain Biker uphillbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chenmoukimo
    uphillbiker,

    Any modification of a device without having read the instruction manual is very dangerous.
    I suggest it's safer to check it out before action.

    C. -M. Hsu
    This is routine maintenance and I don't think there is any danger to be concerned about.

    I don't know about standard spiral cable vs what ever the other stuff is, but what I got from the bike shop is spiral cable, which is the same thing that's been on my bike since I got it 5 years ago and never given me any problems. I don’t see any reason to “rip it out.” The reason why I was having the problems was, again, mainly due to kinks in the housing closest to the derailler, which had accumulated from minor crashes on the trail, bike transportation etc. in addition to whatever had resulted from normal wear and water seeping in, which certainly happened over time from ridding though creeks, riding in the rain or wet conditions etc. When I first posted this thread, I had not accurately diagnosed the problem and come to that conclusion.
    Last edited by uphillbiker; 02-11-07 at 02:26 PM.

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