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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 05-16-03, 11:23 PM   #1
2k2S4
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And so it begins (some questions about tools also)...

I finally decided to retrieve my old Schwinn from the parking garage and it was covered in about 1/8" of grime. I cleaned it off enough to touch it without getting filthy and rolled it home on one wheel. I think no less than 10 people on the Metro made the fairly obvious observation that I had to back wheel.

Anyway, I got it home and started to take stuff apart. The bottom bracket makes a nice gritty noise as you turn the crank, the pedals didn't spin too well and the headset almost as bad as the bottom bracket. Here is the current state:



Now I have a few questions.

Everything in that picture was done with standard automotive tools. Since I haven't worked on a bike in years, my bicycle tool kit consists of a chain tool and tire levers. I'm going to replace the bottom bracket and headset but I want to make sure I have the correct tools. I'll need something to take the crank off and remove the bottom bracket, but there seems to be a wide variety of crank extractors and bb tools, and I'm not sure which ones I need.

The bike is 14 years old with a Shimano Sport LX crank and a Shimano bottom bracket. Could someone point me to the correct tools to remove and install the crank and bottom bracket? Links would be super helpful. Thanks all. It's been a long time since I've worked on a bike, so please bear with me.

- Matt
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Old 05-17-03, 04:15 AM   #2
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indeed you, have made a fairly good job in dismantling the bike to the bare frame, just hope that you didn't strip the thread on bottom bracket, this site will guide you to your bike maintainances, www.parktool.com
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Old 05-17-03, 07:06 AM   #3
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The first tool that you need is a metric ruler. Measure the distance between the rear dropouts. If it's 126mm, I might rethink the whole project. If upgrades are in your future plans for this bike, the narrow rear dropout spread will be a constant source of frustration. Basically, you won't be able to 8 or 9 speed it and finding a 126mm wheel or adapting an existing wheel will be an extra problem.

Whatever you decide to use for a rear wheel, you will eventually need the correct socket to remove the spin-on freewheel, or a socket and chainwhip to remove the cassette lockring. At some point you will also need a pair of skinny cone wrenches (probably 14 and 15mm) to adjust your wheel bearings.

You will need a crank puller to get the old crank arms off. Be careful to thread it as far as you can onto the crank arms so that you don't ruin the threads.

A bike this old probably has an old-style bottom bracket. You can probably get the old one's lock ring off with creative use of your crummiest old screwdriver and a hammer. The right side of the bottom bracket will have a left hand thread. I used to use the tips of needle nose pliers in the pin holes to get the right side cup out.

To install your new bottom bracket you will need a special splined socket. The torque spec. for the right side is about 30 ft/lbs so you won't be able to get close to that with some make-shift method.

You can gerry rig a headset press from a length of threaded rod and a handful of fender washers. Lots of guys outsorce headset installation to a shop. Truth is, lots of headsets have also been tapped into place with piece of board and a hammer.

Most everything just requires metric allen wrenches. Don't expect your 4mm and 5mm wrenches to last the rest of your life. Rounded out wrenches make for rounded out bolts.
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Old 05-17-03, 07:46 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally posted by orguasch
indeed you, have made a fairly good job in dismantling the bike to the bare frame, just hope that you didn't strip the thread on bottom bracket, this site will guide you to your bike maintainances, www.parktool.com
Thanks for the link...actually I haven't touched the bottom bracket or crank yet so nothing should be stripped. I'll check the Park website. Thanks again.

- Matt
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Old 05-17-03, 07:51 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally posted by Spoke Wrench
The first tool that you need is a metric ruler. Measure the distance between the rear dropouts. If it's 126mm, I might rethink the whole project. If upgrades are in your future plans for this bike, the narrow rear dropout spread will be a constant source of frustration. Basically, you won't be able to 8 or 9 speed it and finding a 126mm wheel or adapting an existing wheel will be an extra problem.
Thank for the warning. It is 126 mm, but this is something I was aware of before I began the project. I'm not going to upgrade to 8/9 speed, so I've been searching E-bay for a 126 mm, 7-speed wheel. I haven't found anything yet, but I'm sure I will. I'm also going to call a few LBS and see what they might have lying around.

Quote:
Originally posted by Spoke Wrench
Whatever you decide to use for a rear wheel, you will eventually need the correct socket to remove the spin-on freewheel, or a socket and chainwhip to remove the cassette lockring. At some point you will also need a pair of skinny cone wrenches (probably 14 and 15mm) to adjust your wheel bearings.

You will need a crank puller to get the old crank arms off. Be careful to thread it as far as you can onto the crank arms so that you don't ruin the threads.

A bike this old probably has an old-style bottom bracket. You can probably get the old one's lock ring off with creative use of your crummiest old screwdriver and a hammer. The right side of the bottom bracket will have a left hand thread. I used to use the tips of needle nose pliers in the pin holes to get the right side cup out.

To install your new bottom bracket you will need a special splined socket. The torque spec. for the right side is about 30 ft/lbs so you won't be able to get close to that with some make-shift method.

You can gerry rig a headset press from a length of threaded rod and a handful of fender washers. Lots of guys outsorce headset installation to a shop. Truth is, lots of headsets have also been tapped into place with piece of board and a hammer.

Most everything just requires metric allen wrenches. Don't expect your 4mm and 5mm wrenches to last the rest of your life. Rounded out wrenches make for rounded out bolts.
Thanks a ton! I thought I would need some sort of press for the headset, but since the old one basically fell out, I wasn't sure. I have pin spanners and a torque wrench (for the car) which should work. Thanks for the tips about the cone wrenches, I forgot about those.

- Matt
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Old 05-17-03, 11:51 AM   #6
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The headset "fell" out? Check to make sure it, the head tube, is not ovalized. If you get a crank extractor, my reccomendation would be to get the Campy extractor with the right hand threads. It is easier to use than the Park. The Park's handle is built in and never in the right spot to get leverage when reomoving the crank. Pedros also makes a knockoff(cheap) of the Campy extractor.
If you have a pin tool that fits your BB cup go ahead and get a Hozan spanner for the lock ring, They are cheap and everyone needs tools that serve almost no other purpose.
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Old 05-17-03, 12:37 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally posted by Rev.Chuck
The headset "fell" out? Check to make sure it, the head tube, is not ovalized. If you get a crank extractor, my reccomendation would be to get the Campy extractor with the right hand threads. It is easier to use than the Park. The Park's handle is built in and never in the right spot to get leverage when reomoving the crank. Pedros also makes a knockoff(cheap) of the Campy extractor.
If you have a pin tool that fits your BB cup go ahead and get a Hozan spanner for the lock ring, They are cheap and everyone needs tools that serve almost no other purpose.
Actually Chuck, I should rephrase that. I was able to pull it off the bike without much effort. The head tube looks perfectly round, but I will check that. Thanks for the tips.

- Matt
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