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  1. #1
    On Your Right ZackJones's Avatar
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    Any Custom Wheel Builders Here?

    Greetings,

    Being the romantic guy that I am and the fact that my wedding anniversary is next month I have been thinking about getting a new wheelset for my wife Donna.

    I realize her bike (a K2 Mach 1.0) isn't high end or anything but she's light and really doesn't need 32 spoke rims. I also told her that a lighter set of wheels would make it easier for climbing, etc.

    So here's the deal. If there's a fellow BF member who builds wheels and would be interested in working with me to build a set for Donna either reply here or PM me and we'll talk.

    Her bike is equipped with 8 speed Sora components.

    Zack
    "You never fail, you simply produce results. Learn from these" - Anonymous

  2. #2
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    Zack
    A few things to consider about low spoke count wheels, the spokes are thick and heavier then standard spokes, the rims are heavier and have a larger cross section then rims used on standard wheels, they are more difficult to take care of and true by the home mechanic, and finally, they are not as durable and often weigh more then a 32 spoke cross three wheel. I think, and this is just my opinion based on my experience, I have built over 200 wheelsets over the years of various types and configurations, when building a set of wheels I try to take the following into consideration.
    a. economics
    b. durability
    c. potential wheel loading
    d. type of riding to be done on the wheel
    e. road condition where the wheel will be generally ridden
    f. what the customer wants.

    for a light rider, I like a wheelset built as follows:
    shimano ultegra hubs, they are the benchmark in the industry for value and dependability, they are clean looking and roll smoothly.

    14/15 guage DT butted stainless steel spokes, they present a small weight savings with the 15 guage center sections and the durability of a 14 guage spoke at the bend and the threaded sections where breaking usually occurs.

    nichol plated brass nipples for durability and the ability to build to a higher spoke tension than alloy nipples.

    I build the rear wheel in a cross three pattern for durability under load and torque input and the front you can do nicely with a cross two build because torque input is not an issue.

    You can do unique things with rim colors and spoke colors to make your wheels stand out from the original equipment wheels that are on most bikes, on the wheels I build, all of the pulling spokes are on the outside on the last cross so they pull the spoke bundle in when torque is applied, if you look through the valve hole in the rim with the tire removed, you can read the hub lable, the labeling on both hubs and rims are in the same orientation when installed on the bike, the spokes are all enenly tensioned to the spoke and rim manufacturers recommendation, the rim is properly dished, true to within .002" and round to within .002".

    Mavic open pro rim because they are well built, straight and round at the start and build into a clean looking wheel that will serve you well for years. Velocity also manufactures quality rims that build into great looking wheels.

    a well built wheel should not require a re-true after the first ride, it should stay round and straight and require nothing more then minor touch uo once a season. wheel true and durability is directly related to proper and even spoke tension.

    When it comes to wheels, you can always spend more money but is the money well spent.
    Achieve your goals: Attitude is everything:

  3. #3
    On Your Right ZackJones's Avatar
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    Originally posted by mrfix
    [B]Zack
    A few things to consider about low spoke count wheels, the spokes are thick and heavier then standard spokes, the rims are heavier and have a larger cross section then rims used on standard wheels, they are more difficult to take care of and true by the home mechanic, and finally, they are not as durable and often weigh more then a 32 spoke cross three wheel.
    mrfix: Thanks for the reply. You bring up some very interesting points. I had made an assumption that fewer spokes = lighter wheels and that may not be the case.

    a. economics
    b. durability
    c. potential wheel loading
    d. type of riding to be done on the wheel
    e. road condition where the wheel will be generally ridden
    f. what the customer wants.
    Ok my answers would be:

    a - Cheap is good
    b - I don't want to have to work on the wheels after every ride.
    c - Light load < 140 pounds
    d - Casual rider - 12 - 15 mph. No racing.
    e - smooth. No major potholes, etc.
    f - Donna isn't into biking as much as I am so there's a chance she wouldn't even notice a difference between what she is riding now and a new set of wheels.

    From the sounds of things I'd be better off to just get her current wheels relaced with a set of ultegra hubs.

    Zack
    "You never fail, you simply produce results. Learn from these" - Anonymous

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    Zack
    If the wheels she is riding now are straight, I mean straight befor lacing. that is a great economical idea, that is providing you can find a builder that builds and trues using corrsct and even spoke tension. Don't use the old spokes or nipples. The ultegra hubs are a great upgrade that she will notice, they roll much better are quite a bit lighter and look clean.
    Achieve your goals: Attitude is everything:

  5. #5
    Just ride. roadbuzz's Avatar
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    Originally posted by ZackJones
    I had made an assumption that fewer spokes = lighter wheels and that may not be the case.
    I second mrfix's description of the ideal wheel, although I will probably opt for spiffier hubs.

    I think the real benefit of the low spoke count wheels is reduced wind resistance, particularly above ~18 mph. The butted spokes mrfix suggests reduce weight and wind resistance (and are easy to adjust and/or replace).

    Quality, lightweight tires and tubes makes a big difference, too. (Rotating weight, suppleness, etc.) Though she probably won't really appreciate the difference. Ignore the avatar, this isn't a plug for any particular brand.

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