Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    29
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Using Stan's Sealant With Regular Presta Tubes

    Does anyone have any experience using Stan's with regular presta tubes? I've read some articles that said it's possible to do if you get the tubes with the removable valve cores. What about those tubes that don't have removable valve cores? Anyone try it?

  2. #2
    Erstwhile Trogon terry b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,032
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Continental makes tubes with removeable cores. I use them filled with Specialized Airlock sealant. I've tried the Tufo version too. Have not tried Stan's.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    134
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Do all Continental tubes come with removable valve cores?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Eugene OR
    My Bikes
    VooDoo Limba, 2000 GF Kai Tai, old lugged fixies
    Posts
    130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can use stan's sealant with regular presta valves (you're talkingrim strips, not tubes I hope). When you install the sealant just put the wheel on a bike stand, open up part of the tire, install 2oz of Stan's, remount the tire, and inflate. It's pretty easy to do, and Stan's is the best system out there as long as everything's set up properly.

    I have a ton of experience with Stan's, so if you have any other issues let me know.

  5. #5
    The mods changed this... damocles1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,348
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tubes cost $4.00. Is it really worth the trouble?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Eugene OR
    My Bikes
    VooDoo Limba, 2000 GF Kai Tai, old lugged fixies
    Posts
    130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You don't need a tube. So you save $4.

    You also lose rotational weight which will make you're bike faster, and you can literally stab a sharpened spoke into one sidewall and out the other and watch it immediately seal itself.

  7. #7
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,718
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, Stan's is great stuff. I don't know about putting it in inner tubes, though, haven't done that myself. As for putting it into a presta valve with the valve core removed, the Stan's system I have has presta valves with removable cores, and I think part of the reasoning behind that was so that sealant could be added through the valve stem. Running my tires tubeless, it seems easier to just break the bead on the tire and put the sealant in that way, so I've never tried injecting the sealant through the valve stem. I do like the removable valve cores when used with the Stan's rim strips, though, because you can replace the cores cheaply if the valve goes bad or gets too gunked up with sealant-
    Last edited by well biked; 03-25-07 at 08:14 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Eugene OR
    My Bikes
    VooDoo Limba, 2000 GF Kai Tai, old lugged fixies
    Posts
    130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can put the sealant in a tube but what's the point? I guess if you're looking for added puncture resistance it's not a bad idea, but most flats I see come into the shop are pinch flats essentially caused by tubes.

  9. #9
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,718
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fiver
    You can put the sealant in a tube but what's the point? I guess if you're looking for added puncture resistance it's not a bad idea, but most flats I see come into the shop are pinch flats essentially caused by tubes.
    We don't know what type of tires the OP is using, what type of riding, etc. The Stan's tubeless system is great for off road riding from my experience, but only if you want to run your tires at relatively low pressures. Anything over forty or forty-five pounds, the Stan's sytem isn't recommended-

    edit: For the OP, I just checked the Stan's NoTubes site, they do carry a special injector that will work for putting the sealant directly into valve stems, whether a tubeless tire, inner tube, etc. according to the info given, as long as the valve core is removed-
    Last edited by well biked; 03-25-07 at 11:07 PM.

  10. #10
    Erstwhile Trogon terry b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,032
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Pretty sure the answer is "yes" as I've never seen a Conti tube without a removeable core.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Eugene OR
    My Bikes
    VooDoo Limba, 2000 GF Kai Tai, old lugged fixies
    Posts
    130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    We don't know what type of tires the OP is using, what type of riding, etc. The Stan's tubeless system is great for off road riding from my experience, but only if you want to run your tires at relatively low pressures. Anything over forty or forty-five pounds, the Stan's sytem isn't recommended-
    I currently run Stan's system at 100 psi on my cross bike with slicks and I've never had a problem. I've converted tons of road wheels to Stan's and have tested many of them to hold at 160psi, although I would not recommend riding at pressure that high.
    Wire bead road tires work best, and you have to know how to set it up, seat the bead right, etc.
    At the shop I work at we convert wheels and tires for $40 a pop, and have never had any problems.
    Our customers are commuters, racers, hybrids, road, mtn... so we see a lot of different rim/tire combinations.

    The best thing about Stan is that he's encouraging you to test the system and find out what tire/rim combinations work the best for you.

  12. #12
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,718
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fiver
    I currently run Stan's system at 100 psi on my cross bike with slicks and I've never had a problem. I've converted tons of road wheels to Stan's and have tested many of them to hold at 160psi, although I would not recommend riding at pressure that high.
    Wire bead road tires work best, and you have to know how to set it up, seat the bead right, etc.
    At the shop I work at we convert wheels and tires for $40 a pop, and have never had any problems.
    Our customers are commuters, racers, hybrids, road, mtn... so we see a lot of different rim/tire combinations.

    The best thing about Stan is that he's encouraging you to test the system and find out what tire/rim combinations work the best for you.
    I certainly won't dispute what you're saying, but I will say running anything other than fat tires at relatively low pressures goes against what I've heard recommended for the Stan's system. I think when the system was first put on the market Stan himself used the 40psi max recommendation-

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    29
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks everybody for the great info. The bike in question is a cross bike. I've got 32s on it and weigh 155lbs. I usually have the tires pumped up close to 80psi because part of my ride is on the road. The problem is that just about every other ride I get a flat going down the various rocky fire roads. In a very unscientific test, I rode a set of Tufo's for a few rides and never got one flat. Tufo also makes a sealant similar to Stan's. The problem is that Tufo's are expensive. So I'm just looking to see if there's a cheaper way to go. I recently bought a Slime tube and so far it has one ride under it and no problems.

  14. #14
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,718
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by pigiron
    Thanks everybody for the great info. The bike in question is a cross bike. I've got 32s on it and weigh 155lbs. I usually have the tires pumped up close to 80psi because part of my ride is on the road. The problem is that just about every other ride I get a flat going down the various rocky fire roads. In a very unscientific test, I rode a set of Tufo's for a few rides and never got one flat. Tufo also makes a sealant similar to Stan's. The problem is that Tufo's are expensive. So I'm just looking to see if there's a cheaper way to go. I recently bought a Slime tube and so far it has one ride under it and no problems.
    Yeah, I suspect a Slime tube would give about the same results as a tube injected with Stan's sealant. Easier to mess with, too. But again, it does appear the Stan's sealant can be injected into a valve stem, as long as the valve core is removed. One of those special injecors on the Stan's NoTubes site looks like it would be very handy if you go that route-

  15. #15
    velosipedist
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    171
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For CX, tubeless clincher systems just don't work. There are three options...

    1. Install Oliver's YesTubes, inflate to medium pressure, and practice dodging chickenheads and being light over roots.

    2. Install YesTubes. Inflate to high pressure. Ride however you like, but keep mouth shut to prevent losing a filling on the trail.

    3. Choose tubulars. Choose mastic. Choose solvent. Choose a ****ing good wheelset. Choose one tyre you had better well like, 'cause swapping them regularly is now in your past. Choose scraping glue. Choose a spare tyre for when you puncture. Choose riding home on your spare, wondering if it might roll off the rim. Choose trendy Eurotrash parts for your bike in a range of ****ing materials. Choose sitting on that couch disassembling mind-numbing, spirit-crushing punctured tyres, patching them and stuffing ****ing innertubes back into their casings. Choose your future. Choose tubulars. But why would I want to do a thing like that? I chose not to choose tubulars. I chose somethin' else. And the reasons? There are no reasons. Who needs reasons when you've got cyclocross?
    Last edited by kartoffel; 03-26-07 at 12:24 PM.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Eugene OR
    My Bikes
    VooDoo Limba, 2000 GF Kai Tai, old lugged fixies
    Posts
    130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, I suspect a Slime tube would give about the same results as a tube injected with Stan's sealant. Easier to mess with, too. But again, it does appear the Stan's sealant can be injected into a valve stem, as long as the valve core is removed. One of those special injecors on the Stan's NoTubes site looks like it would be very handy if you go that route-
    Ever try puncturing a slime tube with a screwdriver? Or a tack? It will just go flat.

    Slime is nothing like Stan's. At all. The solutions are uniquely different, and made for different purposes.
    I change "slime" tube flats all day in the shop. All they do is add weight and mess.

    For CX, tubeless clincher systems just don't work.
    I went for a long trail ride out in the brutal winter this year with my wheels converted to tubeless. I was running pressure at 18psi, and didn't get a single flat because pinch flats are impossible with tubeless, and the added traction and suspension from running such low pressure is well worth the investment. We have converted maybe 100 or so wheels systems to Stan's this year so far and haven't seen a single flat, or received any complaints from our customers.
    THis system is proven, and works.
    1. Install Oliver's YesTubes, inflate to medium pressure, and practice dodging chickenheads and being light over roots.
    Yes tubes gives you none of the benefits of Stan's. They look like thorn resistant tubes that add a ton of rolling weight to your wheelset.
    Last edited by fiver; 03-26-07 at 01:11 PM.

  17. #17
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,718
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fiver
    Ever try puncturing a slime tube with a screwdriver? Or a tack? It will just go flat.

    Slime is nothing like Stan's. At all. The solutions are uniquely different, and made for different purposes.
    I change "slime" tube flats all day in the shop. All they do is add weight and mess.
    Interesting about the Slime. I've never used a Slime tube, it just seemed that a tube with Slime and a tube with Stan's sealant in it would be similar, but again I haven't used Slime so I don't know, just guessing-

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    29
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fiver
    Ever try puncturing a slime tube with a screwdriver? Or a tack? It will just go flat.

    Slime is nothing like Stan's. At all. The solutions are uniquely different, and made for different purposes.
    I change "slime" tube flats all day in the shop. All they do is add weight and mess.



    I went for a long trail ride out in the brutal winter this year with my wheels converted to tubeless. I was running pressure at 18psi, and didn't get a single flat because pinch flats are impossible with tubeless, and the added traction and suspension from running such low pressure is well worth the investment. We have converted maybe 100 or so wheels systems to Stan's this year so far and haven't seen a single flat, or received any complaints from our customers.
    THis system is proven, and works.


    Yes tubes gives you none of the benefits of Stan's. They look like thorn resistant tubes that add a ton of rolling weight to your wheelset.
    I'd be interested in trying Stan's tubeless conversion system, but it appears that these systems are very rim specific. I checked out notubes.com and it doesn't display any kit for the wheels I use (Open Pros and Velocity Aerohead and Aerohead OCs). These rims measure 20mm/19mm. The narrowest rim listed for the tubeless system is a 21.5mm.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Eugene OR
    My Bikes
    VooDoo Limba, 2000 GF Kai Tai, old lugged fixies
    Posts
    130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd be interested in trying Stan's tubeless conversion system, but it appears that these systems are very rim specific. I checked out notubes.com and it doesn't display any kit for the wheels I use (Open Pros and Velocity Aerohead and Aerohead OCs). These rims measure 20mm/19mm. The narrowest rim listed for the tubeless system is a 21.5mm.
    Just call them up and ask. Usually I use one of the 26" rim strips with narrow road rims, the stretch to fit.
    You also might have to put a layer of velox or packing tape under stan's rim strip to fill in the deep section enough so that the rim strip seats evenly against either side of the rim's bead.
    It's nice to be able to try out a few different strips to see what will work best, but unfortunately most shops don't stock a good selection of Stan's rim strips. I know the owner of the shop uses open pors so I'll take a look for you tomorrow and see if I can find out which rim strip he used, and if any other modifications were necessary.

    BTW you'll get the best results using a Serfas brand wire bead tire.

  20. #20
    velosipedist
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    171
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fiver
    I went for a long trail ride out in the brutal winter this year with my wheels converted to tubeless. I was running pressure at 18psi, and didn't get a single flat because pinch flats are impossible with tubeless, and the added traction and suspension from running such low pressure is well worth the investment. We have converted maybe 100 or so wheels systems to Stan's this year so far and haven't seen a single flat, or received any complaints from our customers.
    This system is proven, and works.


    Yes tubes gives you none of the benefits of Stan's. They look like thorn resistant tubes that add a ton of rolling weight to your wheelset.
    That's good to know Does the Stans system still work at higher pressure? Does Stan's on a cyclocross tire burp air--at any pressure? I might consider it on a dedicated wheelset if it actually works.

    The problem with going tubeless, though, is that you lose the flexibility of swapping tires in 5 minutes. Once you have to measure and pour sealant, prepare soapy water, and have an air compressor at hand every time you change tires, you might as well be running tubulars. Except that tubulars don't leak goop all over the place, you don't have to reinflate tubulars before every ride, you can be certain any tubular will actually fit on your rim. With Stan's, every new untested tire is a crap shoot yet the manufacturer plays it off like beta testing their product is fun and cool.

    Give me a tubeless system that's not messy, never burps air, never loses air overnight, requires no special spooge, works with any clincher tire, and lets me change tires in 5 minutes. If Stan's snake oil can't do that, you're better off tolerating innertubes or diving into the world of tubulars.

    Oh yeah... those Oliver's YesTubes are just humor Some burned out ex-Stans users put it together.
    Last edited by kartoffel; 03-27-07 at 03:22 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •