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Old 03-25-07, 11:33 PM   #1
TallRider
me have long head tube
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last build pics for awhile: 68cm Schwinn flat-bar commuter with sweet rear wheel

Along with recently finishing a build with a 1980 Schwinn Traveler, I just put the finishing touches on a commuter build using a nearly identical frame, this time a 1978 Schwinn Le Tour III.

Both are 67cm frames with 63cm top tube, made of straight-gauge high-tensile steel (1020) tubing, with lugged construction. Stamped horizontal dropouts with no derailer hanger, requiring a "claw" to attach rear derailer to the drive-side rear dropout. Both frames are also a similar hue of blue, sort of like Carolina Blue but a bit darker and more saturated. They're designed for 27-inch rims, and won't take anything smaller with the Dia-Compe centerpull brakes that came stock with both bikes.

Also, both bikes have ridiculously high standover height, such that I can stand over with zero clearance while barefoot, or with about one inch clearance when wearing shoes. This makes the bikes a less likely target for stealing, as no one who's shorter than 6'4" can even stand over the top tube.

I've outfitted the commuter for utility, and I'm very pleased. I used 1x7 gearing, and a rear wheel with 7-speed cassette that I built specifically for this bike. A 13-32 cassette is paired with a 40t (steel) chainring (set at 41.5mm chainline) - the crank came on the Schwinn Traveler when I bought it, and has a chainguard built into the spider so I don't need to worry about pant-legs and drive-side shoelaces, or about the chain falling off.

I took the rear 7-speed shifter, and rear derailer with integrated "claw" hanger, from an old mountain bike with horizontal dropouts and no derailer hanger. The mtb is going to become a singlespeed, while its rear-indexed-shifting parts now work well on this commuting bike.

The flat bar is topped off with bar-ends (which I use when riding along at a constant speed without need to shift or brake), a little horn (rated for ages 3-5!), a speedometer, and a blinking light.

The rear wheel is a pretty cool job. I needed a 27" (630mm) rim because the brake pads are already at the bottom of the brake arms, and can't go 4mm further down to handle a 700c (622mm) rim. I also wanted a 7-speed cassette, since I'm a big guy (I weigh only 180# which is light for my height) and nearly always bend the axles on freewheel hubs, unless they're 5-speed.
I used a Shimano Nexave silent clutch freehub (b/c I got it for cheap, and it had good mtb-worthy seals on it; I don't really care if it's silent) and spaced it down from 135mm to 128mm, which requires me to flex the 124mm-spaced dropouts a bit when installing the wheel.
The rim is an NOS Araya single-wall, 36-hole rim, relatively light at 480g. Wasn't the easiest to build up - it's relatively soft - but should be durable enough.
I used DT 14/15/14 double-butted spokes and laced up the wheel half-radial: 3-cross on the drive-side and radial on the non-drive-side. The hub isn't rated for radial spoking, which officially voids Shimano's warranty (like I was ever going to use it on a hub that I bought for $15), but since the non-drive-side spokes are significantly lower tension in a highly-dished road wheel, the flange isn't actually endangered. Plus, non-drive-side spokes don't need to carry much torque in a dished wheel, and the fact that radial spokes don't carry torque will mean less fluctuation in the already-low-tension non-drive-side spokes, so less likelihood of spoke heads breaking from fatigue. Or so argues Sheldon Brown. It mainly just looks really cool, especially with the spoke washers and spoke heads all on the outside of the non-drive-side flange.

Here are a few pictures, which are linked to a gallery with lots of pictures of the bike. The first two pictures are linked to a main gallery with pictures of the bike. The picture of the rear wheel is linked to a specific gallery with pictures of the rear wheel (which is also linked from the main gallery). There are also pictures of my previous commuting build with the frame, with drop-bars and and a 1x5 drivetrain with a 5-speed freewheel, linked from the main gallery page.




Last edited by TallRider; 11-20-08 at 03:32 PM.
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Old 03-26-07, 02:21 AM   #2
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I like the concept. Now, if I could only pull it off on a 56.

Tim
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Old 03-26-07, 03:06 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by timcupery

Tim, what spokes are those? I have a huge bunch of spokes with the same logo, and was always wondering who was making them.
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Old 03-26-07, 03:32 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops

Tim, what spokes are those? I have a huge bunch of spokes with the same logo, and was always wondering who was making them.
Hmmmm. A D & a T. DT. Hmmmmmm. Who can that be...........
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Old 03-26-07, 03:45 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Lectron
Hmmmm. A D & a T. DT. Hmmmmmm. Who can that be...........

Wheelsmith?


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Old 03-26-07, 04:31 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Lectron
Hmmmm. A D & a T. DT. Hmmmmmm. Who can that be...........
That's the best news I heard the whole month: you're saying I bought a ton of DT Swiss spokes for close to nothing. Yay!
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Old 03-26-07, 04:43 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops
That's the best news I heard the whole month: you're saying I bought a ton of DT Swiss spokes for close to nothing. Yay!
Also very nice to see you're using brass washers.
Adds like 3 grams to a complete sett of wheels,
makes it stronger and looks stunning.

You should also consider using a spoke head driver.
Make the heads and washers more flush with the flanges.

Keep up the good work
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Old 03-26-07, 06:08 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lectron
Also very nice to see you're using brass washers.
Adds like 3 grams to a complete sett of wheels,
makes it stronger and looks stunning.

You should also consider using a spoke head driver.
Make the heads and washers more flush with the flanges.

Keep up the good work
err... that would be Tim
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Old 03-26-07, 07:22 AM   #9
TallRider
me have long head tube
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I should have just put in a separate thread about the rear wheel! given that all the comments have been about it. I added some more description about the rear wheel (which has its own photo gallery, linked from the main photo gallery and from the wheel picture in this thread).

Lectron: where does one get a spoke head driver? What I did with the washers is to
a) bend the spoke such that it pulls the head mostly into place and deforms the washer
b) use a pointed steel punch and a hammer to drive the spoke heads even more to seat flush with the flange.

So I think what I've got is pretty good. But a spoke head driver would probably just be easier.

And yeah, washers do help in most wheels (except Phil and Dura-Ace and a few other types of hubs where the spoke holes are designed small enough so the spoke seats ideally - and even then washers make sense if you build with spokes that are 15g (1.8mm) at the head.
And they add virtually no weight, and only at the hub where rotating weight matters much less than at the rim.
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Old 03-26-07, 11:19 AM   #10
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Mother of God that is one tall bike frame. Pretty cool though!!
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Old 03-26-07, 11:29 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timcupery
Lectron: where does one get a spoke head driver? What I did with the washers is to
a) bend the spoke such that it pulls the head mostly into place and deforms the washer
b) use a pointed steel punch and a hammer to drive the spoke heads even more to seat flush with the flange.

So I think what I've got is pretty good. But a spoke head driver would probably just be easier.
A spoke head punch/driver is really nothing else than a a conical punch that fits exactly against the spoke head. DT Proline has one, but any good hardware store should be able to sell you one that works nearly quite as good. And the wheel looks great
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Old 03-26-07, 12:24 PM   #12
TallRider
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Originally Posted by Lectron
A spoke head punch/driver is really nothing else than a a conical punch that fits exactly against the spoke head. DT Proline has one, but any good hardware store should be able to sell you one that works nearly quite as good. And the wheel looks great
Thanks. I'll probably look for a more practical punch, though not worrying about perfectly conical.
The wheel was surprisingly out-of-true by a few mm when I checked it after a week's worth or riding. This hasn't happened with other wheels I've built, and I suspect the difference is the single-wall, eyeletless rim, which was sort of "soft" when building it up. But it should be plenty durable.
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Old 03-26-07, 06:39 PM   #13
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why the radial lace on the non-drive side of the rear?

edit... nevermind... I can't read.
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Old 03-27-07, 11:06 PM   #14
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I really like the build, Tim. I'm 6'3" so it looks just right!

I'm curious why you ran the brake cables over the handlebar. Aesthetics or function?

Chuckie
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Old 04-09-07, 04:58 PM   #15
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If I recall way back you said you were thinking of putting a seatpost in this bike without a shim. I have the same bike and said the diameter was 25.4 with the shim- what is it without the shim? Or are you using it?
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Old 04-09-07, 07:52 PM   #16
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running the cables over the bars is for function. For the front brake, if I ran the cable housing under the bar it would have to curve really sharply to get into the cable stop for the centerpull brakes.
for the rear, it's complicated by the frame's being set up for rear brake to come from the left side of the handlebar, whereas I've got the now-standard setup with left-lever = front brake. But I think I could run that under the bars and it would work as well or better, and not interfere with anything (although it doesn't really interfere at all on top, either). Oh, now I remember why I did the rear brake cable over the top - so it won't interfere with the speedometer wire dropping down toward the fork. See this picture, makes things more obvious. There's lots of pictures of the handlebar area in the gallery that is linked from this photo.



This frame, and the 1980 Traveler which is geometrically equivalent, both take 26.0mm seatposts. There's some imperfection on the inside of the tubing, and I sanded it lightly with sandpaper and also with a metal file to remove burrs. But it's definitely a 26.0 and not 25.8, which was notably loose in both frames even before sanding down the burrs.
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Old 04-09-07, 07:53 PM   #17
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Thanks.
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