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  1. #1
    Motor, not the bike
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    Vote! warranty issue, or rider problem.

    I bought a new Trek 2200 one year ago, almost to the day. I was cranking up a hill, and the rear derailleur somehow caught up in the chain and it bent up and around and apparently into the frame, and I hit the pavement (just a little road rash, and got a ride home from a cute girl!). The end result is that the carbon seat stay is cracked, and the derailleur is mangled like Iíve never seen before. I'm not entirely sure how this happened, whether it was the Shimano part or the frame letting go causing a misalignment. The bike shop took photos and emailed them to Trek, and first reply is that this is not covered under warranty. Everything seemed to be running true prior to this, and derailleur was aligned. I was not shifting at the time. They want me to pay $800 to fix. I'll attach photos when I get them.

    This seems unreasonable to me. I believe that this should be a warranty issue. Agree or disagree?

    The link to the Trek warranty

    http://www2.trekbikes.com/us/en/Insi...anty/Index.php

  2. #2
    Senior Member Snow_canuck's Avatar
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    That blows, What kinda mileage do/did you have on this bike? Did the LBS say that it was in good shape before the wipe-out?

  3. #3
    Motor, not the bike
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    Only 260 miles. It was a weak season last year!
    Last edited by SkiNut; 03-27-07 at 02:10 PM.

  4. #4
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    Check where the chain broke. Was it the "factory installed" pin? If the links were starting to seperate they can snag the derailleur and wrap it up. When I worked at a Trek dealer I found about half of the connecting pins were installed incorrectly.

    Other than that all I can say is stuff happens. It sucks but riding bikes can be dangerous.
    It's not rocket surgery.

  5. #5
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Hamer
    Check where the chain broke. Was it the "factory installed" pin? If the links were starting to seperate they can snag the derailleur and wrap it up. When I worked at a Trek dealer I found about half of the connecting pins were installed incorrectly.

    Other than that all I can say is stuff happens. It sucks but riding bikes can be dangerous.
    An improperly installed chain is my bet, as well. Is there any chance you did any damage to the chain? Did you ever break it or mess with the master link?

    If the shop installed the chain (and did it wrong), your issue may be with them. It may be hard to prove any of this, however.

  6. #6
    Motor, not the bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Hamer
    Check where the chain broke. Was it the "factory installed" pin? If the links were starting to seperate they can snag the derailleur and wrap it up. When I worked at a Trek dealer I found about half of the connecting pins were installed incorrectly.

    Other than that all I can say is stuff happens. It sucks but riding bikes can be dangerous.
    I'll look at the chain. I didn't check that. Thanks for the info! I've been riding for about 20 years, and have never seen anything like this!

  7. #7
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkiNut
    I bought a new Trek 2200 one year ago, almost to the day. I was cranking up a hill, and the rear derailleur somehow caught up in the chain and it bent up and around and apparently into the frame, and I hit the pavement (just a little road rash, and got a ride home from a cute girl!). The end result is that the carbon seat stay is cracked, and the derailleur is mangled like I’ve never seen before. I'm not entirely sure how this happened, whether it was the Shimano part or the frame letting go causing a misalignment. The bike shop took photos and emailed them to Trek, and first reply is that this is not covered under warranty. Everything seemed to be running true prior to this, and derailleur was aligned. I was not shifting at the time. They want me to pay $800 to fix. I'll attach photos when I get them.

    This seems unreasonable to me. I believe that this should be a warranty issue. Agree or disagree?

    The link to the Trek warranty

    http://www2.trekbikes.com/us/en/Insi...anty/Index.php

    Well, for US $800 you can buy an excellent steel road frame that will serve you a lifetime. To be fair, I like the Trek 2200's geometry a lot, but hate anything carbon.

    Any chance the derailer pivoted out of place? You might want to visually inspect the hanger. Do a bit of CSI.

  8. #8
    el padre
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    Yes stuff happens...and bike riding can be dangerous ....but expensive at the hand of a bike mechanic, maybe? I usually err on the side of stuff happens but I would look good at what might have caused the error. peace

  9. #9
    You Know!? For Kids! jsharr's Avatar
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    Not enough information given. If the deraileur was improperly adjusted by a non Trek dealer, or the chain was broken and not put back together correctly, then no, it is not a Trek issue. If the frame or drive train failed and caused the problem, then yes, a warranty issue. Gonna be hard to prove this one. However, Trek replaced/repaired a frame for me (broke off a thermally bonded shifter mount) back in the late 80's and I told my LBS that I wrecked and broke the shifter off the bike.
    Are you a registered member? Why not? Click here to register. It's free and only takes 27 seconds! Help out the forums, abide by our community guidelines.
    Quote Originally Posted by colorider View Post
    Phobias are for irrational fears. Fear of junk ripping badgers is perfectly rational. Those things are nasty.

  10. #10
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    It seems the issue here is cost since it appears that physically you are ok. The OP is asking who should foot the bill for replacement of the frame and other effected components. Of course like others have said, it appears that the devil is in the details.

    You need to reach some sort of conclusion as to what happened. Also remember that your warranty is offered from the manufacturer and not the dealer. So if you get unsatisfactory results, I would:

    1. Take it to other dealers first and see if you can find somebody to help you out with submitting as warranty.

    2. Go to Trek directly, probably after option #1 has been exhausted.


    Just don't get caught up in a pissing match with a particular dealer. It won't do you any good.

    Here are the warranty details"

    Quote Originally Posted by Trek
    This warranty does not cover-
    Normal wear and tear
    Improper assembly
    Improper follow-up maintenance
    Installation of parts or accessories not originally intended for, or compatible with, the bicycle as sold
    Damage or failure due to accident, misuse, abuse, or neglect
    Labor charges for part replacement or changeover

    This warranty is void in its entirety by any modification of the frame, fork, or components.
    This warranty is expressly limited to the repair or replacement of a defective item and is the sole remedy of the warranty. This warranty extends from the date of purchase, applies only to the original owner, and is not transferable. Trek Bicycle Corporation is not responsible for incidental or consequential damages. Some states do not allow the exclusion of incidental or consequential damages, so the above exclusion may not apply to you. Claims under this warranty must be made through an authorized Trek dealer. Proof of purchase is required. The subject item must be registered with Trek Bicycle Corporation, either through on-line registration or by the receipt of a warranty registration card by Trek Bicycle Corporation, before a warranty claim may be processed. Warranty duration and detail may differ by frame type and/or by country. This warranty gives the consumer specific legal rights, and those rights may vary from place to place. This warranty does not affect the statutory rights of the consumer.

    Carbon crash replacement policy
    Assessing any damage done to a carbon fiber part requires more experience than is needed to inspect metal parts. If you crash or impact your bike and the force of the impact is absorbed by a carbon part, we strongly encourage you to replace the part, even if there are no indications of damage. If such a crash or impact occurs, Trek offers a crash replacement program for carbon parts, substantially reducing any replacement cost. To take advantage of this program, contact us using the information listed above and ask for the Warranty department.

  11. #11
    The mods changed this... damocles1's Avatar
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    Operator error...

  12. #12
    Motor, not the bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by damocles1
    Operator error...
    Really? How so? It's a mechanical failure. Should it matter which part? I n my business, I always stand behind my product and honor the warranty.

  13. #13
    Senior Member trek1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkiNut
    Really? How so? It's a mechanical failure. Should it matter which part? I n my business, I always stand behind my product and honor the warranty.
    Bottom line is Trek should replace/repair as new the frame if it is within the warranty and it wasn't misused or abused and if assembly was from an authorized dealer!
    Fuel EX8(05') 2100 ZR(06') 7.5 FX(06')=Best $ I ever spent =~)
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    The bitter taste of poor quality far out lasts the sweet taste of a low price.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by trek1
    Bottom line is Trek should replace/repair as new the frame if it is within the warranty and it wasn't misused or abused and if assembly was from an authorized dealer!
    I disagree. Long before the incident that ruined the frame the operator could have mis-shifted or shifted under load or dropped the chain and kept pedaling or crashed and caused damage to the chain or removed and re-installed the chain or ........... Did the operator inspect the bike before the ride? That damage could have gone un-noticed and been the cause of the crash that ruined the frame. Trek offers a warranty against manufacturer's defect, not insurance. My experience is that Trek is very generous with their warranty.

    The bottom line is that we all have to take some responsibilty in everything that happens to us. it's not black and white.
    Last edited by Pete Hamer; 03-27-07 at 07:06 PM.
    It's not rocket surgery.

  15. #15
    * vpiuva's Avatar
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    I had a chain break while climbing, and the exposed pin grabbed a jockey wheel and mangled the RD and dropout. Check your jockey wheels to see if it appears a pin stuck in yours, too.

  16. #16
    The mods changed this... damocles1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Hamer
    I disagree. Long before the incident that ruined the frame the operator could have mis-shifted or shifted under load or dropped the chain and kept pedaling or crashed and caused damage to the chain or removed and re-installed the chain or ........... Did the operator inspect the bike before the ride? That damage could have gone un-noticed and been the cause of the crash that ruined the frame. Trek offers a warranty against manufacturer's defect, not insurance. My experience is that Trek is very generous with their warranty.

    The bottom line is that we all have to take some responsibilty in everything that happens to us. it's not black and white.
    Couldn't have said it better or more clearly...

    In short, there is no insurance for stupidity...

  17. #17
    # BF-STL-00020 marengo's Avatar
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    Buy a steel frame.

  18. #18
    cs1
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    Quote Originally Posted by marengo
    Buy a steel frame.
    +1
    1999 Waterford RSE-11, 1995 Waterford 1200, 1989 Specialized Rockhopper Comp
    1989 Raleigh Technium, 1989 Schwinn Traveler, 1986 Specialized Rockhopper
    1984 Specialized Stumpjumper, 1986 Specialized Stumpjumper and just way too many projects to list.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkiNut
    This seems unreasonable to me. I believe that this should be a warranty issue. Agree or disagree?
    Disagree (until you can determine the exact cause of the mishap).

    Trek's warranty doesn't cover all failures. If it did, then your situation would be covered. But until you can prove that the failure was due to something covered under the warranty, you are sol.

    If this sounds like we're talking about an insurance claim, that's essentially what a warranty is.

    Bob

  20. #20
    Spelling Snob Hobartlemagne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marengo
    Buy a steel frame.
    Or Ti

    The first rule of flats is You don't talk about flats!

  21. #21
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    For $800 you can snag a full carbon frame today if that is your cup of tea.

    Had a chain(Shimano Ultegra) separate and destroyed the smallest cog on the rear cassette but nothing else. 3 mile walk home was not pleasant. I think the Shimano pins system on their chains is outdated.

  22. #22
    Senior Member seamuskeogh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkiNut
    I was cranking up a hill, and the rear derailleur somehow caught up in the chain and it bent up and around and apparently into the frame, and I hit the pavement
    without more information than this my vote is operator error.

    -jk

  23. #23
    30 YR Wrench BikeWise1's Avatar
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    This is not the first time something like this has happened. I detailed a similar incident in a thread in which I pointed out the inherent weakness of CF seatstays. The guy had messed with his limit screws, shifted into the spokes and ripped the derailleur off. The now freed mech went round the wheel and smashed into the seatstay cracking it. Any other material commonly used in bikes would have weathered the incident with only scratches, but not CF. I'm not a CF hater-one of my bikes is a Madone, but I have no illusions of it's ability to withstand impacts like what you experienced.

    I agree, anytime something like this happens, it stinks.

    Without examining the bike myself, I can draw no conclusion.

    Some thoughts:
    • If there has ever been, as someone else mentioned, a really bad shift or a jammed or thrown chain, the chain may have been damaged and was a ticking bomb.


    • You may be able to press a warranty if no one other than your shop has ever touched the drivetrain and there is evidence of a dimpled outer plate where the pin was pressed in at the point where the chain failed indicating possible damage during original installation. This would have happened at the factory, and while some astute wrenches might notice it during assembly and adjustment, many would not.


    • It is always wise to observe your chain closely while turning the crank backwards by hand(off the bike!) once a week or so, or anytime you've snagged it, or misshifted. Often, you can spot a deformed plate quite easily and this will save money and skin.


    Good luck with this.

  24. #24
    Senior Member seamuskeogh's Avatar
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    what an articulate post.

    Thank you, BikeWise1

  25. #25
    cab horn
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    Quote Originally Posted by damocles1
    Operator error...
    Never...
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

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