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  1. #1
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    Removing the Crank...

    I have a hybrid bike- the Sepcialized Sirrus A1 Sport, and I need to remove the crank today.

    Is it possible to do, or do I need to drag it in to a bike shop? Any tools I may need that are special to removing cranks, or what?

    I'm sure my Topeak Alien won't be enough.

    Any ideas? Hints? Tips?


    Thanks for the help!

    Koffee

  2. #2
    I am a lonely visitor RegularGuy's Avatar
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    In most cases, removing a crank requires the use of and 8 mm hex key and a crank puller. Some self-extracting cranks need only the 8 mm hex key. Older cranks may need a thin 14 or 15 mm wrench.

    Removing crank arms isn't too difficult. I think it's a good idea to use a torque wrench when reinstalling them. They need to be torqued down pretty tight (30 foot lbs or more).

    My suggestion: take it to the LBS. Let them pull the crank for you, and reinstall it. But get them to show you how it's done, and then buy the tools for yourself.
    Religion is a good thing for good people and a bad thing for bad people. --H. Richard Niebuhr

  3. #3
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    Thanks...

    As soon as I read your post, I figured I'd need to take it to the LBS. I don't think they'll bother to show me how to reinstall. It's the goons at Village. They're not big on customer service.

    I'll most likely buy a book and get onto Sheldon's webpages and figure out how to reinstall myself.

    Hopefully, they can move fast and get this crank off quickly!

    Thanks RG!

  4. #4
    I am a lonely visitor RegularGuy's Avatar
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    Why do you need to remove the crank anyway?

    Reinstalling most cranks only requires an 8 mm allen key and some muscle. Using a torque wrench is a good idea.

    Whenever I remove and reinstall my drive side crank, I plan to tweak my front derailleur a little bit, too. I don't always have to do it, but I plan on it.

    Oh, yeah, www.parktool.com has pretty good instructions for removing and installing crankarms. And check out the Barnett's Manual, chapter 20. Joe has the online version somewhere on this site.

    As for tips and hints: When removing a crankarm, it is important to thread the removal tool into the arm completely. If the tool isn't seated well, it can easily strip the threads out of the crank. I like to put a drop of oil on the tool's threads to help ease it into the crank.
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  5. #5
    Kev
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    It takes less then 5 minutes to pull the cranks, I would just do it yourself it is not a difficult task. A crankpuller will cost you around $10-15 so they are not very expensive.
    Basicaly you screw in the crankpuller onto the crank arms, then turn the handle which puts pressure against the bottom bracket and pulls the cranks off. Here is directions at parktool web site.
    http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/...dle_type.shtml

  6. #6
    I am a lonely visitor RegularGuy's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Kev
    It takes less then 5 minutes to pull the cranks, I would just do it yourself it is not a difficult task. A crankpuller will cost you around $10-15 so they are not very expensive.
    I figured someone would advise this, and I really don't disagree. Here's my thinking though: Koffee will have to go to the LBS to buya crank puller, anyway. Why not have them do the work and show her how to use the tool? I would say mailorder the puller, but she said she needs to remove the crank today.

    What's your thought on reinstalling, Kev?
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  7. #7
    Kev
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    You should get a torque wrench preferably. Since she said that the LBS won't show her how to do it, might as well do it herself. On anything under $20 why go mail order? The amount you save won't be beneficial. I believe in doing your own work if possible is a great learning experience and this is one of the simpler things to do, screw in puller turn handle cranks are off. To put on fit cranks on BB screw in bolt to proper torque and you are done.

    Why do you need to pull off the cranks today?

  8. #8
    Kev
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    OH yeah if actualy changing crank arms, pull off the pedals before removing the cranks. I forgot to do that once, OMG those things are hard to get off afterwards.

  9. #9
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    I needed it off today because I'm travelling with it tomorrow.

    The LBS took it off, but they didn't let me see the process. They took the bike in the back.

    When they brought the bike back, they told me how to put it back on. I will get a torque wrench and get it back on. I may get a little help. We'll see.

    Thanks to everyone for their help. I will check out the parktools.com and Sheldon's webpages to get it put on correctly!

    Koff

  10. #10
    I am a lonely visitor RegularGuy's Avatar
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    On torque wrenches: AutoZones sells a Great Neck brand beam type torque wrench for about $10.00. It isn't the best quality tool, but it isn't bad and it's plenty inexpensive I think it is a 1/2" drive but comes with a 3/8" adapter. Drop a few more dollars for an 8mm allen head and you're gold.

    The reason a torque wrench is important for installing cranks is that you need to muscle them on good and tight, but not so tight that you mushroom the spindles on your bottom bracket.

    If you don't want to carry a torque wrench in your luggage, you can just use an 8 mm allen key. I have one that is about 6-1/2 inches long. It gives me enough leverage to install a crank bolt, and I'm not such a gorilla that I'm liable to mushroom the spindles. Install the bolt good and tight, and check to make sure it is staying tight every once in a while. A drop or two of blue lock-tite on the crank bolt threads is a good idea too.
    Religion is a good thing for good people and a bad thing for bad people. --H. Richard Niebuhr

  11. #11
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    Hmmm... Good stuff to know when it comes time to reinstall. It really doesn't look that bad to do once I get the low down from you guys.

    Dang, you guys are mechanical geniuses!

    Thanks!

    Koff

  12. #12
    The Red Lantern Rev.Chuck's Avatar
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    If you remove your own cranks, you need to install the extractor straight and thread it fully in or you may simply pull the threads out of the crank and then you will need a pro to get them off.
    A torque wrench is not for muscling things on but for applying a specific troque on a bolt or screw. My smallest wrench will only do 100 inch pounds, deffinitly not muscling. A beam type is Ok if you are careful not to drop it. But they are not known for their accuracy.
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  13. #13
    Kev
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    Yep for power use a Impact wrench those things will take anything off Have not tried it on my bike yet though I know I can get alot more then 30lb torque with it

  14. #14
    Victoria's secret MsVicki's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Koffee Brown
    I needed it off today because I'm travelling with it tomorrow.
    Where are you off to, Koffee?
    Last edited by MsVicki; 05-28-03 at 08:16 PM.
    Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.

  15. #15
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    That's ok. You can say it as many ways as you like. I'm not mechanically inclined (majored in poetry in college), so it's nice to get a summary in any way possible for this situation, seeing as though I need to learn how to do this at some point or another.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Inoplanetyanin's Avatar
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    You could make a NICE good view picture of the part you are trying to disassemble, and people here will tell you what exactly what needs to be done on that particular part.

  17. #17
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Inoplanetyanin
    You could make a NICE good view picture of the part you are trying to disassemble, and people here will tell you what exactly what needs to be done on that particular part.
    I'm going to put you on ignore now.

  18. #18
    Zippy Engineer Waldo's Avatar
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    Koffee-if you don't have a torque wrench yet you can go to your local Sears/Craftsman store and pick up their beam-type. It's the same as the Park (http://www.parktool.com/tools/TW_2.shtml) and you'll pay about what dealer cost is.

  19. #19
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    Thanks Waldo. I'll pick one up from Sears when I get home.

    And thanks to everyone for responding!

  20. #20
    Senior Member Avalanche325's Avatar
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    Park makes a roll-up toolkit that gives you most of the tools to get you started. It is about $100.00 and well worth it if you are going to do your own work. One word of advice on tools - buy the good ones!!!!! Cheap ones will get you damaged knuckles and components.

  21. #21
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    Cheap ones will get you damaged knuckles and components.
    And don't forget banged up fingers too! I banged up my thumb really good with the back tire.... I still feel a little tingly in the tip of the thumb for that one.

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