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Old 04-26-07, 02:52 PM   #1
goku7
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New Chain pre install cleaning or no?

I just got a new chain, I've heard that you should clean off the factory grease/protection coating and lubing it with proper lubricant, cus it's sticky and will attract a lot of dirt. I've also heard that this factory coating is a great lube and I should leave it on. A little confused by the completely different views.

Specifically, I got a SRAM PC-58.

Thanks for the wisdom.
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Old 04-26-07, 03:00 PM   #2
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SRAM calls their version of factory lube "GLEITMO" and touts it as a superior lube.

http://www.sram.com/en/srammountain/...peed/index.php

I usually wipe the outside of a new chain off with a rag dampened with mineral spirits and leave the stuff on until the chain gets noisy (which will usually be quite a few rides). Actually, with a chain to be used on the road, I rarely completely degrease it, just lube with oil based lube as needed, wipe outside off occasionally as needed, etc.-
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Old 04-26-07, 03:09 PM   #3
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I've done it both ways depending on what I treat it with after. With Triflow it seems fine to leave the factory lube on it. With White Lightening I degrease it first.
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Old 04-26-07, 03:10 PM   #4
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Wipe down the outside of the chain and ride, then relube after it runs out.
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Old 04-26-07, 03:21 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by operator
Wipe down the outside of the chain and ride, then relube after it runs out.
Good advice. The sticky film on the outside of the chain only attracts dirt and doesn't contribute to lubrication so wiping it off is ok. Do not soak the chain in solvent to remove the factory lube from the chain internals as it truly is a superior lube there.
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Old 04-26-07, 04:09 PM   #6
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Do a search for Cosmoline + new chain
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Old 04-26-07, 06:04 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiyn
Do a search for Cosmoline + new chain
Do you know for a fact that the coating is cosmoline? SRAM indicates no. Not sure about the other manufactuers but I don't think Shimano chains have cosmoline either.
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Old 04-26-07, 06:07 PM   #8
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The rare times I've installed a new factory lubed chain I just left the lube on after whiping down the chain. That factory stuff is great and usually lasts much longer than my Boeshield T-9 while commuting in the mucky weather.
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Old 04-26-07, 06:12 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nessism
Do you know for a fact that the coating is cosmoline? SRAM indicates no. Not sure about the other manufactuers but I don't think Shimano chains have cosmoline either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by http://www.fuchs-lubritech.co.uk/fuchs1/Products%20-%20Grease%20Pastes.htm
gleitmo 582; 582 Spray

White Chain Lubricant White, adhesive, semi-synthetic grease with gleitmo White Solid Lubricants, which is liquified with a solvent for easy penetration into the cavities of the chain. After evaporation of the solvent a tacky, adhesive grease film is formed, which is resistant to acids and lyes, protects against corrosion and can neither be thrown off nor washed away by water.

APPLICATION AREAS:
Slow speed, high speed and power transmitting chains of all types at temperatures from -15 C to +120 C, also where resistance to water and steam, acids and lyes is required.
- White adhesive chain grease for highest requirements

-Temperature range :
-15/+120 C

The cosmoline suggestion was to give a search tool to some earlier threads. I stand by my earlier stance by continuing to remove the factory lube regardless of name and replacing it with Boesheild. I've had terrific results from this however YMMV
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Old 04-26-07, 07:25 PM   #10
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If the factory stuff is so great, how would someone go about reapplying it. Since it appears to be so thick, I am guessing that they apply it in some hot dip process to get it into the internal rolers. I doubt it is cosmoline since it is not a lube....only intended to protect an item from the elements
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Old 04-26-07, 08:13 PM   #11
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It states above, that its suspended in a solvent. It probably flows really well before the solvent evaporates.
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Old 04-26-07, 08:47 PM   #12
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I'm pretty sure Sheldon recommends this process for new chains.
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chainclean.html
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Old 04-26-07, 08:53 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrongdave
I'm pretty sure Sheldon recommends this process for new chains.
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chainclean.html
But in all seriousness, he recommends keeping the factory lube on. Scroll down to the heading "factory lube." http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html
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Old 04-26-07, 09:01 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrongdave
I'm pretty sure Sheldon recommends this process for new chains.
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chainclean.html
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
Have you paid your Gullibility Tax?
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Old 04-26-07, 09:05 PM   #15
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Seriously though, has anyone tried SRAM's PitStop chain lube? It's a spray on which is the one thing I don't really like about my can of White Lightening, but I wonder how far off it is from the stuff they soak their chains in.
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Old 04-26-07, 10:57 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldokie
If the factory stuff is so great, how would someone go about reapplying it. Since it appears to be so thick, I am guessing that they apply it in some hot dip process to get it into the internal rolers. I doubt it is cosmoline since it is not a lube....only intended to protect an item from the elements

According to The Man (Sheldon Brown) himself:

New chains come pre-lubricated with a grease-type lubricant which has been installed at the factory. This is an excellent lubricant, and has been made to permeate all of the internal interstices in the chain.

This factory lube is superior to any lube that you can apply after the fact.

Some people make the bad mistake of deliberately removing this superior lubricant. Don't do this!

The factory lubricant all by itself is usually good for several hundred miles of service if the bike is not ridden in wet or dusty conditions. It is best not to apply any sort of lube to a new chain until it is clearly needed, because any wet lube you can apply will dilute the factory lube.
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Old 04-26-07, 11:43 PM   #17
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I agree with Nessism, even if you are planning on using a wax based lube that call for a complete cleaning, let the factory lube run its course first since it is oh so smooth. I don;t know about it lasting several hundred miles though, my Shimano one only lasted about 150 on a roadie.
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Old 04-27-07, 02:22 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nessism
According to The Man (Sheldon Brown) himself:

New chains come pre-lubricated with a grease-type lubricant which has been installed at the factory. This is an excellent lubricant, and has been made to permeate all of the internal interstices in the chain.

This factory lube is superior to any lube that you can apply after the fact.

Some people make the bad mistake of deliberately removing this superior lubricant. Don't do this!

The factory lubricant all by itself is usually good for several hundred miles of service if the bike is not ridden in wet or dusty conditions. It is best not to apply any sort of lube to a new chain until it is clearly needed, because any wet lube you can apply will dilute the factory lube.
I don't believe EVERYTHING the man says. If I did I'd be riding on a stone saddle and hollow ball bearings.
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Old 04-27-07, 02:44 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiyn
I don't believe EVERYTHING the man says. If I did I'd be riding on a stone saddle and hollow ball bearings.
Did you check out the dates on those articles? They were all on April 1st.

You can trust him on the chain lube topic.
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Old 04-27-07, 02:51 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider
You can trust him on the chain lube topic.
Just not as he discusses it in this article, as posted above by Wrongdave :

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chainclean.html

Article date, April 1, 2007, btw -

Last edited by well biked; 04-27-07 at 03:00 PM.
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Old 04-27-07, 04:25 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiyn
I don't believe EVERYTHING the man says. If I did I'd be riding on a stone saddle and hollow ball bearings.
You'd also be cleaning your chain by taking out every pin and every link and soaking them in three different neon colored chemicals.

Then you would reassemble with 60 something Powerlinks or Connex.
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Old 04-27-07, 04:31 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider
Did you check out the dates on those articles? They were all on April 1st.
I realize that. But you miss my point.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider
You can trust him on the chain lube topic.
No thanks
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Old 04-27-07, 05:38 PM   #23
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I say get it off the chain ASAP. Only the rollers need to be lubed.the rest of that sticky crap is just excess dirt magnet. It serves no purpose, other than protecting the chain while in storage/transit. Clean the chain and lube the rollers with a poper lubricant. Clean chains that are lubed correctly reallly do work nicely. bk
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Old 04-27-07, 07:47 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiyn


The cosmoline suggestion was to give a search tool to some earlier threads. I stand by my earlier stance by continuing to remove the factory lube regardless of name and replacing it with Boesheild. I've had terrific results from this however YMMV
Waste of time. You either

a) degrease it and relube
or
b) Wipe down chain and ride

What exactly are the downsides of b?
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