Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA
    My Bikes
    1997 Bianchi CDI- color celeste (of course)
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Chain Replacement- How Often?

    I've been to 2 different bike shops (both w/ good reputations, sell good quality gear), and have gotten different answers as to why my shifting is less-than-desireable.

    1 shop told me that a road bike chain needs replacement every 1-2k miles. Another first told me that the problem would clear up w/ just a tune-up.

    FWIW, the problem is that I get clacking sometimes when I shift the rear cassette, and also shifting between the 2 front gears, the chain pops off (about once every 60 miles or so- enough to be really annoying).

    FWIW 2, the bike is never ridden in the rain, and here in Virginia, we really don't see dry & dusty conditions.

    FWIW 3, The bike itself is a 1997 Bianchi CDI which, before the past couple of months, had only been ridden about 300(?) miles. I am the original owner (I now ride about 240-ish miles/month since Oct. 2006). I do know enough to not cross-thread the gears, i.e., small gear on small gear.

    Thanx in advance- but please don't get too technical, I'm rather new to all of the terms!

  2. #2
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,883
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by lx93
    I've been to 2 different bike shops (both w/ good reputations, sell good quality gear), and have gotten different answers as to why my shifting is less-than-desireable.

    1 shop told me that a road bike chain needs replacement every 1-2k miles. Another first told me that the problem would clear up w/ just a tune-up.

    FWIW, the problem is that I get clacking sometimes when I shift the rear cassette, and also shifting between the 2 front gears, the chain pops off (about once every 60 miles or so- enough to be really annoying).

    FWIW 2, the bike is never ridden in the rain, and here in Virginia, we really don't see dry & dusty conditions.

    FWIW 3, The bike itself is a 1997 Bianchi CDI which, before the past couple of months, had only been ridden about 300(?) miles. I am the original owner (I now ride about 240-ish miles/month since Oct. 2006). I do know enough to not cross-thread the gears, i.e., small gear on small gear.

    Thanx in advance- but please don't get too technical, I'm rather new to all of the terms!
    The great thing about determining chain wear is that you don't need to know the mileage on the chain, the time on the chain, and you don't need an LBS' advice. All you need is a ruler..............Measure from the center of the pins. Over a span of 12 full links, a brand new chain will measure 12". Again, measuring from the center of the pins, when a chain is elongated to the point that it reaches 12 1/16" over a span of 12 full links, it's time to replace the chain. It's as simple as that. If you do this, the life of your cassette or freewheel cogs as well as your chainrings will be increased significantly-
    Last edited by well biked; 04-29-07 at 10:21 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    449
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Your chain seems to be 10 years old. There can be links that do not bend freely because of corrosion or grime. Just buy and install a new chain, it's cheap. You probably need to oil your derailleurs and adjust the limits on them.
    Last edited by Barabaika; 04-30-07 at 12:11 AM.

  4. #4
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sram pc48's $10.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  5. #5
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Saratoga, CA
    Posts
    11,507
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I get about 5000 miles out of my chains when they wear out to 12-1/16". It's really not a matter of time or mileage, but how worn it is. Most people get less than 3000 miles. I've heard of 10,000 miles as well.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,616
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Everything you need to know about when to replace a chain:

    http://sheldonbrown.com/chains.html#stretch

    Bob

  7. #7
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA
    My Bikes
    1997 Bianchi CDI- color celeste (of course)
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's definitely not corrosion- I never ride in the rain.

    I guess what I was looking for most of all was confirmation that a shop isn't lying to me if it tells me that I'm not going to get more than 2k out of a chain.

  8. #8
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by lx93
    It's definitely not corrosion- I never ride in the rain.

    I guess what I was looking for most of all was confirmation that a shop isn't lying to me if it tells me that I'm not going to get more than 2k out of a chain.
    The shop is lying to you becaue they have NO way of knowing what the lifespan of a chain maybe. There is no way they can tell what gears you're riding and through what conditions and how long your maintenance cycle is going to be.

    Nobody can answer this question, they can only give you a ballpark figure - it's up to YOU to check the chain wear regularly then note to yourself what number that may be so you have a future comparison.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •