Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    shedding fat dgasmd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    South Florida
    My Bikes
    LOOK 595 Ultra/Campy Record 10Sp, restored Guerciotti/Campy C-Record 6 Sp, and TIME RXR/Campy SR 11Sp.
    Posts
    3,140
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Am I missing the obvious with tubular tires?

    I feel I either have the worst luck or I am plain missing the obvious trick to tubular tires. I restored an 80's steel Guerciotti and it has tubulars in it. I have put about 150 miles in it and I am averaging about 50 miles per rear tire. The first just had a burst/tear, the second a flat of unknow source, and today a very small piece of glass cut right through it. That is just plain ridiculous Also, it seems that everytime I change the tire, it starts riding with a lump to it only to realize later it is because the stem is crooked. No matter how much I try it seems to happen everytime despite it looking straight before I inflate the tire and after.

    I have been using Panaracer Sprinter tires so far by the way.

    Is there some obvious trick to putting the tire right to begin with? Is this common? Is there some other much better tire that is far more puncture resistance that won't cost me$80-100?? I hardly ride this bike, so I don't want to invest $150-200 in tires I hardly use.

    Sorry for the rant, but I am a bit frustrated with this issue.
    Arguing with ignorant people is an exercise in futility. They will bring you down to their level and once there they will beat you with their overwhelming experience.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,426
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sew ups flat like crazy, its the nature of the beast. There are some that are armored that hold up longer, I believe Tufo is one brand. Also, with cheaper tires, they just aren't straight and will never go on right without a bulge. Watch out with the cheap ones, if they are not straight, they won't glue completely and can come off. Ask me how I know.
    Il faut de l'audace, encore de l'audace, toujours de l'audace

    1980 3Rensho-- 1975 Raleigh Sprite 3spd
    1990s Raleigh M20 MTB--2007 Windsor Hour (track)
    1988 Ducati 750 F1

  3. #3
    shedding fat dgasmd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    South Florida
    My Bikes
    LOOK 595 Ultra/Campy Record 10Sp, restored Guerciotti/Campy C-Record 6 Sp, and TIME RXR/Campy SR 11Sp.
    Posts
    3,140
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by San Rensho
    Sew ups flat like crazy, its the nature of the beast.
    This is the contrary to what I have heard, but given my recent experience with them, I would say you are probably right.
    Arguing with ignorant people is an exercise in futility. They will bring you down to their level and once there they will beat you with their overwhelming experience.

  4. #4
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,777
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Check out this thread in the Classic and Vintage forum, it used to be a "sticky" thread but isn't anymore: totally tubular

    There are lots of tubular devotees that hang out in the C and V forum, I would recommend asking tubular questions there.

  5. #5
    The Red Lantern Rev.Chuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Posts
    5,967
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have found that the cheaper the tubular the more likely the flat. I used to run thru Conti Giros pretty quick, but I switched to Tufo jet specials and they have held up well.
    Are you a registered member? Why not? click here to register. Its free, and only takes 27 seconds!
    Help out the forums, abide by our community guidelines.

    I am in the woods and I have gone crazy.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    seattle
    My Bikes
    several!
    Posts
    142
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't have enough experience with different brands of tubulars to be able to say which resist flats better... but I think the larger issue is that tubulars are a big enough pain in the ass to mount properly, for anybody, that they should be saved for race day only. Nobody makes a tubular tire with puncture resistance or durability in mind... they are only used for a slight weight advantage. I use tubulars on my track bike only. For a road bike I would lace up your hubs to a clincher rim. It sounds like you'll save money in the long run at the rate you're going.

  7. #7
    The Red Lantern Rev.Chuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Posts
    5,967
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by thekorn
    Nobody makes a tubular tire with puncture resistance or durability in mind...

    Continental makes a Sprinter with the Gatorskin casing, very puncture resistant. The Sprinter is a pretty tough tire, good for crits, road racing, or training, even with out the Gatorskin.
    Are you a registered member? Why not? click here to register. Its free, and only takes 27 seconds!
    Help out the forums, abide by our community guidelines.

    I am in the woods and I have gone crazy.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Road Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    My Bikes
    Terraferma 650b, Mondonico SL and ELOS, Masi Gran Criterium, Trek 610, Breezer Liberty, Georgena Terry Classic
    Posts
    10,978
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dgasmd
    I feel I either have the worst luck or I am plain missing the obvious trick to tubular tires. I restored an 80's steel Guerciotti and it has tubulars in it. I have put about 150 miles in it and I am averaging about 50 miles per rear tire. The first just had a burst/tear, the second a flat of unknow source, and today a very small piece of glass cut right through it. That is just plain ridiculous Also, it seems that everytime I change the tire, it starts riding with a lump to it only to realize later it is because the stem is crooked. No matter how much I try it seems to happen everytime despite it looking straight before I inflate the tire and after.

    I have been using Panaracer Sprinter tires so far by the way.

    Is there some obvious trick to putting the tire right to begin with? Is this common? Is there some other much better tire that is far more puncture resistance that won't cost me$80-100?? I hardly ride this bike, so I don't want to invest $150-200 in tires I hardly use.

    Sorry for the rant, but I am a bit frustrated with this issue.
    Hi, I'm one of the sew-up advocates over on Cranky and Vintage. I think you have a few things going on here. First, I'm a big advocate of using cheap or old sew-ups, but I like cheap new ones and good quality old ones. If your Panaracers are new, fine, but maybe their still POSs. When they came out many moons ago I had trouble getting them to go on straight, so I think the quality was real poor in the '80s.

    Your burst/tear was unfortunate, but casings can have defects, due either to being badly made or getting scratched. Sewup sidewalls are not as well protected as most (not all!!) clinchers.

    You picked up glass, but most tubulars are thinner in the tube, casing, and tread than even lightweight clincher as fara as I can tell. Many current ones have kevlar inside or the Gatorskin stuff, so they can have more glass resistance than the old days. But really, you need to watch where you are going. I've been lucky here in Michigan that there doesn't seem to be much glass in the streets.

    Your alighment issue is twofold: the tire needs to be straight (look for a pair of Vittoria Rallly or Gommitalia on Ebay for 30-40 bucks a pair, I think these are real nice tires! You also need good instructions on how to put it on. There I would suggest you get one of the books by Lennard Zinn on roadbike repair, or his book Zinn's Cycling Primer. His glueing and installation method is IMHO the best. I used to try to gorilla it on, getting glue all over and having lumpy installations. Problem is I do not have the arm strength to force the tire! Following Zinn I get them on cleanly and without llumps, using gravity instead of muscle.

    I have not bought any of the $150-$200 tire pairs, but I have not felt the need. I can tell you you don't need to at this point, you just need soem good basic tires and learn to get them on by a good method. If you can't get the Gommis or Vittorias on, you won't do any better with high-level $80 Vittorias, $80veloflex, or $200 dugasts!

    If you can't avoid glass, and you know that you have much better glass resistance with lightweight clinchers, put your money into a nicer set of clincher wheels with the skins of your choice, instead of clinchers! Glass is the final issue for me, oh yeah, thorns really really suck, too.

    Road Fan

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •