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  1. #1
    actin' the foo ragboy's Avatar
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    dork disc -- yay or nay?

    So does the so-called plastic "dork disc" a legitimate safety feature on an 80's road bike or can it be taken off without worry of me going flying over the handlebars?

  2. #2
    Senior Member FlatFender's Avatar
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    get rid of it.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Lt.Gustl's Avatar
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    get da' chrome disc

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    "Purgatory Central" Wino Ryder's Avatar
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    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by ragboy
    So does the so-called plastic "dork disc" a legitimate safety feature on an 80's road bike


    Yepper, the "so called" plastic dork disc (which is a stupid label if I ever heard one) was indeed a legitimite safety feature. In those days most bikes used DT friction shifters, and if you were'nt careful shifting to the lowest cog you could overshift and put the chain right into the spokes.

    You can pretty much guess what would happen after that.
    ~ "I like the way the brake cables come out of the top of the levers and loop around to the brake calipers!...I like those downtube shifters too!...No no no, don't take 'em off, don't take 'em off,...leave 'em on, leave 'em on! - Thats right baby!!

    ~BF - Steel Club Member #00051

  5. #5
    actin' the foo ragboy's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Wino Ryder]



    Yepper, the "so called" plastic dork disc (which is a stupid label if I ever heard one) was indeed a legitimite safety feature. In those days most bikes used DT friction shifters, and if you were'nt careful shifting to the lowest cog you could overshift and put the chain right into the spokes.

    You can pretty much guess what would happen after that.
    So you're saying you would leave it on? I use index shifting 99% of the time.

  6. #6
    Senior Member robo's Avatar
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    You don't need it if the limit screws are set right on your rear derailer.

  7. #7
    Non Tribuo Anus Rodentum and off to the next adventure (RIP) Stacey's Avatar
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    If you're a Fred, leave it on.

  8. #8
    Senior Member freeranger's Avatar
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    There is no safety issue with removing it.
    As stated above, so long as the limit screws are set correctly, your chain shouldn't overshift. I took the disc off of my mtn.bike when I changed the cassette. My road bike still has one, but it's small and black and you wouldn't notice it unless looking for it. If I take the cassette off for any reason, I'll probably remove it (the cassette would have to come off to take this one off-unless I tried to cut it), otherwise, I'll leave it on-like I said, it really isn't noticeable.

  9. #9
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robo
    You don't need it if the limit screws are set right on your rear derailer.
    Above is theoretically correct.

    However, I've dropped a chain into the spokes a couple of times in the past 7+ years while mountain biking. It was probably due to a combination of shifting + climbing + rough terrain. Luckily, I was going slow, felt the chain slip and let-up on the pedals before any major damage.

  10. #10
    Elitist Troglodyte DMF's Avatar
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    I wouldn't use it on a modern road bike. But mountain bikes are a different matter. It's all too easy to prang the rear dérailleur on a limb or rock and then all bets about the lower chain limit are off. Drop the chain inside and you may well eat the dérailleur and wheel, after munching on a face full of dirt.

    Make your decision based on calculated risk, not on fears of being called a "Fred".
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  11. #11
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    I leave mine on just to piss people off.

    Really though, my bike came with one, and the real question is, why bother removing it? It weighs approximately nothing and provides some protection against an admittedly rare chance of overshifting, but a rare chance with severe consequences. So what does it hurt, other than one's OCP sensibilities?

    I say, defy convention. Rock the dork disc.

  12. #12
    Certifiable Bike "Expert"
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Underbridge
    the real question is, why bother removing it?
    Eventually it breaks, and starts rattling around, or worse - preventing the cassette from freewheeling... this has been my experience. No reason to take it off before that occurs, though.


    Some of the new Cannondales have gigantic ugly huge black spoke protectors.
    I don't even use the offensive term "Fred." -- Sheldon "All Cyclists Are My Friends" Brown (1944-2008)

  13. #13
    Death fork? Naaaah!! top506's Avatar
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    I think they are MORE useful on index systems, if you 1) didn't have the limit screws set right and 2) switch to friction.
    I just checked my bikes and it's 50-50, but all the bikes ridden by my wife and kids have 'em. My 12-year-old daughter just loves the huge chrome one on her Ficelle.
    Top
    You know it's going to be a good day when the stem and seatpost come right out.

  14. #14
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Wino Ryder]



    Yepper, the "so called" plastic dork disc (which is a stupid label if I ever heard one) was indeed a legitimite safety feature. In those days most bikes used DT friction shifters, and if you were'nt careful shifting to the lowest cog you could overshift and put the chain right into the spokes.

    You can pretty much guess what would happen after that.
    Nope. All derailers have limit screws...even friction downtube controlled ones. The dork disk is a back up for people who don't know how to adjust their derailer so that the chain doesn't move too far inboard and run off the back of the freewheel (hub). No bike needs them if properly adjusted.

    As for sucking a chain into the spokes, it's not all that bad. If it happens, stop pedalling!
    Stuart Black
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  15. #15
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    Carefully remove it and put it on scambay.

  16. #16
    jwa
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    Couldn't you have asked a more straightforward question - which chain lube is the best, or something?

    My buddy's Basso is en route to a framebuilder to have the der hanger replaced after his suckingspoke incident. He'd say, leave the disk on.

    Me, I take mine off, following the adjust-it-correctly-and-there's-no-problem philosophy. Unless you're going for the retro look with your 80's ride, in which case you gotta wear crochet-back gloves, too.

  17. #17
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
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    If your derailleur is properly set up and you ensure that it stays that way, take it off.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeranger
    There is no safety issue with removing it.
    As stated above, so long as the limit screws are set correctly, your chain shouldn't overshift.
    +1. Definitely take it off. I heartly recommend it.

    Now, if you should happen to shift into the spokes and you live in the St Louis area, PM me and I'll gladly give you my "I shifted into the spokes and buggered up my 8 driveside spokes BF special. Hope to hear from you soon.

  19. #19
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMF
    I wouldn't use it on a modern road bike. But mountain bikes are a different matter. It's all too easy to prang the rear dérailleur on a limb or rock and then all bets about the lower chain limit are off. Drop the chain inside and you may well eat the dérailleur and wheel, after munching on a face full of dirt.

    Make your decision based on calculated risk, not on fears of being called a "Fred".
    Do you really faceplant in such a case? If the front wheel blocks, then yes, I can see how you'd endo, but rear wheel?

  20. #20
    Senior Member AnthonyG's Avatar
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    You pay your money and you take your choice.

    I don't have them on myself although I have given a felow club member a lift home once as I was passing in a car and saw him stoped on the side of the road checking out the rear wheel. His chain had gone off the largest sprocket into the spokes, pulled the rear derailer into the spokes as well and generaly made a mess of things.

    Regards, Anthony

  21. #21
    Destroyer of Worlds kyledr's Avatar
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    Those who don't need it don't need to ask.

  22. #22
    30 YR Wrench BikeWise1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute

    As for sucking a chain into the spokes, it's not all that bad. If it happens, stop pedalling!
    Problem is, pedalling or not, if the wheel is still turning, it can grab the chain and drag the derailleur into the spokes, bending it or even tearing it from the hanger.

    My take is this: if the derailleur is properly adjusted, you may never have a problem.

    Just like if you always drive properly, you may never need your seatbelt...

    (betcha wear yours all the time!)



    I don't have one, but I am willing to accept whatever consequences should arise from my choice. After all, I own a shop. Inevitably, we get a few guys a year who knuckle under to peer pressure and take them off. They pfutz with their derailleur, then suddenly one day "I was just riding along when the derailleur fell off my bike! That's covered under warranty, right?" Then we look at it. No disk. Broken hanger-sometimes smashed seatstay. All because the chain got lodged between the cassette and spokes due to the absence of a bantam-weight piece of apparently manhood devastating plastic.

    The women are smarter. I've yet to have a woman ask me to remove their spoke protector. It's always the husband or boyfriend...

  23. #23
    Elitist Troglodyte DMF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops
    Do you really faceplant in such a case? If the front wheel blocks, then yes, I can see how you'd endo, but rear wheel?
    Uhhh ... "sudden deceleration" ?
    Stupidity got us into this mess - why can't it get us out?

    - Will Rogers

  24. #24
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMF
    Uhhh ... "sudden deceleration" ?
    When it's the rear wheel to block, you will fall, probably but not necessarily. A faceplate seems very unlikely in that case.

    Take it from someone who falls every 2 months, almost on a cue. OK, I *might* have learned how to fall, but still, I think I'm qualified.

  25. #25
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Underbridge
    , why bother removing it?
    Because the plastic ones turn brittle fairly quickly and start to break away on their own
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Underbridge
    provides some protection against an admittedly rare chance of overshifting,
    Don't kid yourself, the plastic breaks far too easily to provide any real measure of protection
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Underbridge
    So what does it hurt, other than one's OCP sensibilities?
    Other than providing a false sense of security to the Fred's of the world, they usually break off on the side of the road or worse out on the trail adding even more ugly garbage
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Underbridge

    I say, defy convention. Rock the dork disc.
    Unless you're rocking an old school chrome special from back in the day (in which case more power to you) lose the dork disc, and learn to adjust your dérailleur.

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