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Old 05-29-07, 10:23 AM   #1
exas
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how to remove cassette?

im trying to change my bike to single speed, ive taken off the rear wheel but the cassette doesn't seem to want to come off.... help?
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Old 05-29-07, 10:25 AM   #2
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You need a cassette tool and and a chainwhip.
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Old 05-29-07, 10:28 AM   #3
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can you elaborate on this.... i had thought you just take off the rear wheel and slide the thing off....
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Old 05-29-07, 10:34 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by exas
can you elaborate on this.... i had thought you just take off the rear wheel and slide the thing off....

That would be wildly dangerous if true. You need these tools:



The chainwhip keeps the cassette from spinning. The cassette tool fits into the lock ring of the cassette. You then can just twist it off (with a wrench).

Directions can be found here: http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=48

This is a very cheap job at a shop if you don't want to buy the tools.
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Old 05-29-07, 10:41 AM   #5
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I have never paid for it so I don't know, but anything over $5 would be excessive in my mind. It takes just a few seconds.
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Old 05-29-07, 10:46 AM   #6
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To the OP - I know you said "cassette", but is it a cassette or older freewheel? The reason I ask is that most bikes that use cassettes are likely to have vertical dropouts. Older road bikes that use freewheels usually have vertical dropouts and are hence more suitable for single/fixed gear conversions.

freewheels need a different tool than cassettes.
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Old 05-29-07, 10:59 AM   #7
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That is a freewheel.
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Old 05-29-07, 11:13 AM   #8
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it's handy to have a cassette tool to occassionally check the tension on the lockring, and to put your cassette on your other wheel.

if you use a chain-whip, try not to let is twist or turn in your hands at all, becasue the cheap chains can be easily busted. I prevent twisting by putting the whip on the largest cog and holding a spoke at the same time as I'm holding the handle. I'm not sure if this is ok for 'fancy' light prebuilt wheels, but it works with 'normal' wheels
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Old 05-29-07, 11:24 AM   #9
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I just had my LBS switch cassettes on two rear wheels. They charged me $2 total and did it while I waited.
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Old 05-29-07, 11:26 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by exas
i don't know what you mean but here is a picture....
Read all about it here:
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/freewheels.html

Your freewheel appears to say "Falcon" on it. If that is the case, you need THIS TOOL and a big wrench or bench vise. Alternately, a LBS will likely only charge $5 or so to remove it, and do it while you wait. If you only need to do it once, that's what I'd recommend.
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Old 05-29-07, 11:33 AM   #11
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funny you say that, $5 bucks for them to do it? i could buy the socket for $5 outright and take care of it myself...
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Old 05-29-07, 12:28 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by exas
funny you say that, $5 bucks for them to do it? i could buy the socket for $5 outright and take care of it myself...
Unless you can find one locally, you will be on the hook for shipping charges as well.
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Old 05-29-07, 12:34 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by exas
funny you say that, $5 bucks for them to do it? i could buy the socket for $5 outright and take care of it myself...
Then buy the tool and do it yourself. Don't begrudge someone the right to charge you for their time, investment and overhead.
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Old 05-29-07, 12:45 PM   #14
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There are ways to get those off without the tool, just with a very strong vice.. of course you ruin the freewheel, but it doesn't sound like you would need it anyway. Doing it this way, you do sort of risk ruining your hub...

1: insert a punch into one of the holes on the ring that says falcon, hammer at it counterclockwise (I think these are right hand threaded). This is assuming you don't have a pin spanner, if you do, just use it.
2: Dismantle the freewheel mechanism, which may involve removing the axle. This may be a little tough, and be weary of the 200 million little freewheel ball bearings.
3. At the very end you'll be left with this stub with places for the pawls and threadings.. this is likely screwed on very, very tightly to the hub where you would be screwing your single freewheel on.
4. Clamp this side down very tightly in a metal vice, preferably one that is securely mounted. There should be flats around where the pawls would go, make sure to clamp to these surfaces. Make sure not to really torque on it, or you'll just pinch it to the hub, but it should be secure.
5. With the drive-side facing down, you want to turn the entire wheel left to unscrew it (it's right-hand threaded). This will take some force.

And you should be home free. Install the axle if needed. I think Sheldon Brown does a better job explaining this somewhere.
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