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Old 06-23-07, 08:36 PM   #1
geo8rge
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Can I use any of these chain tensioners on my fixie?

I have a fixed gear with horizontal dropouts. They are not track dropouts, to remove the wheel you pull it out toward the front of the bike. I am worried that the bolt on the tensioner will slip off the back of the curved dropout.

I have drop outs like these:
http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_dr-z.html#dropout

These are the most complete selection of tensioners I could find.
http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&rh=n%3A3494341&page=1

I was thinking the ones with 2 bolts might work.
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Old 06-23-07, 08:40 PM   #2
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Why would you want a chain tensioner with horizontal drops? It's not needed.
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Old 06-23-07, 09:03 PM   #3
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yup, chain tensioners (which are a bad idea with fixed-gear bikes anyway, they're supposed to be used on singlespeeds) are used to take up slack when converting a vertical-dropout bike to singlespeed. With horizontal dropouts, you have fore-aft movement to work with and can get the chain tight without a tensioner.
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Old 06-23-07, 09:03 PM   #4
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And tensioners should never be used on a fixie, either. They're meant for single-speeds.
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Old 06-23-07, 11:16 PM   #5
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I think he meant axle slide arrestors or chain tugs, not chain tensioners as commonly known. Read the post and see the reference carefully - I suspect geo8rge knows conventional chain tensioners are not meant for fixies.

As to the original question - sorry, don't know. Perhaps you can use a file to make the possibility of the chain tug sliding off the rounded back less likely.
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Old 06-24-07, 06:02 AM   #6
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I suspect geo8rge knows conventional chain tensioners are not meant for fixies.

Don't assume anything. I built a fixed gear wheel on a whim and found I like not having to feel guilty because I am too lazy to adjust my derailer (which would stay unadjusted for months).

I don't see "chain tug" in sheldon browns glossary. It looks like on the net, chain tensioner is used for both a chain tug and an idler pulley.

If an internet store or parts maker is reading this, please post pictures of both sides of all products so that I can make an informed decision. Thank you.

Thanks for the responses.
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Old 06-24-07, 06:41 AM   #7
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The "chain tug" things are what's on the back of the (rear-opening) horizontal dropouts of this Redline 925. Can't see them very well b/c the picture is small. But basically they help to pull your axle back so you can get the chain to proper tightness.

This isn't necessary to have proper chain tension on a fixed-gear bike though, it just makes things easier.

I you have a bolt-on rear wheel (instead of quick-release) one way to get the chain tighter (and remember, you don't want it too tight) is to tighten one side and then angle the wheel so that the other side is further back - then tighten the second one, loosen the first. In this way you can "walk" the wheel backwards in the dropouts.
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