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  1. #276
    Junior Member constant mesh's Avatar
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    Just remember these two:

    #1
    Guitar picks are best tools for removing/disassembling/prying rubber and plastic components. In heat of the moment we usually take a screwdriver and partially destroy the stuff with it. Won't happend with a nylon pick. They are up to 2mm thick.

    #2
    Cantilever braking surface on your rim can be easily clean with a 'gator grit'. It's a synthetic steel wool, give it a good rub, then degrease it with a degreaser (something like M600 or similar, you can get it in any auto body shop, usually the call it "silicone spot remover", it's for prep before painting - won't destory any rubber or plastics, it's very mild but effective) or soapy water.

  2. #277
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    Another destructive method of removing a freewheel

    I needed to remove a Maillard freewheel. The tool
    needed to remove this freewheel was the CT-3 from bicycletool.com (http://www.bicycletool.com/normandym...wheeltool.aspx) or the Normandy Maillard tool. The freewheel has 24 splines where the tool should fit. I didn't have the possibilitty to acquire the tool. To remove the freewheel I used a 27 milimeters hex bolt with two nuts. The head of the bolt fits perfectly in the splines of the freewheel, the freewheel as an inside diameter of 31 milimeters. The two nuts where strongly screwed against each other. One of the nuts was clamped in a benchwise and the head of the bolt was used as the freewheel removal tool.
    Some images of the nut and the freewheel after removal.

    http://i53.tinypic.com/w2obuo.jpg
    http://i51.tinypic.com/25frlon.jpg
    http://i52.tinypic.com/jf9so5.jpg
    http://i56.tinypic.com/2lnwa69.jpg


    If the nuts slide against each other, than they are not sufficiently tighten. I used a bolt with the strength of 8.8. The head of a weaker bolt might have been deformed. http://www.roymech.co.uk/Useful_Tabl...s/Strength.htm is a table with the strength of bolts. I think this method can be used to remove other types of freewheels. In my case the freewheel splines are intact, but the bolt head was deformed.
    Last edited by spm40; 09-29-10 at 02:49 AM.

  3. #278
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    What unusual tools or supplies do you like to carry on the road for unanticipated repairs? I've heard of pieces of cut-up inner tube, lengths of duct tape, lengths of wire...

    What else?
    You don't read my signature anyway, do you?

    Tom Reingold, noglider@pobox.com
    Residences: West Village, New York City and High Falls, NY
    Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

  4. #279
    Senior Member
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    1990 Romic Reynolds 531, 2009 Giant TCR Advanced custom build, Merlin Works CR Ti custom build
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    When building wheels with very light gauge spokes like DT Revolutions, spoke windup can be a real pain. There are tools to hold the spoke from rotating, but usually good technique (overturning the nipple then backing off) will avoid the windup. The trick is to see the twist. I use "flags" made out of short strips of masking tape stuck to each spoke about in the middle of the length. If you line these up on every spoke all facing in the direction of the rotation of the wheel or all across the rotation direction, it is easy to see when a spoke is turning and correct the twist. I got the idea from building a wheel with aero spokes which act as their own indicators of twist. You can easily see when the flat of the aero spoke is not facing forward. So I figured I could make a simialr indicator for round spokes out of the masking tape. Hope this helps.

  5. #280
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    That's excellent! I'll try it. I guess post-it flags would work, too, but they would cost more.
    You don't read my signature anyway, do you?

    Tom Reingold, noglider@pobox.com
    Residences: West Village, New York City and High Falls, NY
    Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

  6. #281
    Senior Member
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    For my sanity, please don't credit the above spammer with the tip he posted. It's a cut and paste from page 1 of a post I made over 3 years ago. I've reported the post as spam.

  7. #282
    Throw the stick!!!! LowCel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
    For my sanity, please don't credit the above spammer with the tip he posted. It's a cut and paste from page 1 of a post I made over 3 years ago. I've reported the post as spam.
    Thanks for the report, spammer is no longer among us.
    I may be fat but I'm slow enough to make up for it.

  8. #283
    Newbie
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    Cold Weld for braze-ons and other attachments

    I have a tutorial on my blog for repairing broken braze-ons and eyelets at home for under $6. This process works for pretty much any frame material.click here

  9. #284
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by passage86 View Post
    I have a tutorial on my blog for repairing broken braze-ons and eyelets at home for under $6. This process works for pretty much any frame material.click here
    Looks pretty good. If you pass e.g. a piece of welding rod through the intact braze on and into the other side, it can hold the repair in proper alignment while the epoxy dries.

  10. #285
    Can'tre Member 3alarmer's Avatar
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    This is a cut and paste from a recent stuck cotter
    thread. I did not invent this, but honestly don't
    recall where or when or from whom I learned it.
    Somewhere in the vast Internet universe somewhere
    I think. If it is out of place, let me know and I will
    remove it:


    I've had pretty good luck lately on several cottered
    cranks with fairly old and rusty cotters by using a
    twenty dollar drill press vise as the press with a
    9/16 ( or thereabouts) socket as the negative space.

    First you oil up the buggers with Triflow, PB Blaster
    (as seen on TV), or your favorite penetrating oil,
    having loosened the nuts to provide access for
    squirting the oil. Now the hard part .. wait ten
    of fifteen minutes for the magic of chemistry to
    do its thing. Leave the nuts on, but with about
    an eighth to a quarter inch of space so the cotter
    can move as you press it.

    Put the drill press vise on the crank with one face
    pressing on the nutted pin end, and the socket
    on the other face to provide negative space for
    the pin to move into. Crank it down hard .. wait,
    crank it down hard again.. wait again. They usually
    pop free by about the third application of force.

    You may need to put a short cheater on the drill
    press vise handle as they are too short to provide
    much leverage. Make sure the vice screw is well oiled
    or greased.

    These are readily available at Home Depot or any
    of the chinese tool import places. They work as well
    as specialty cotter presses at a fraction of the price.

    I have hammered out a few over the years and always
    found it to be a somewhat risky and problematic
    procedure. This works better, although I am forced
    to agree with Tom and Bikeman that it is not nearly
    as satisfying as pounding on something with a hammer.



    Mike Larmer
    Last edited by 3alarmer; 11-12-10 at 10:30 AM. Reason: Punctuation

  11. #286
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    Dear moderators:

    I started this thread a few years back, hoping it would be a valuable resource for cyclists, with all sorts of neat tricks that would augment one's bicycle mechanics arsenal of knowledge.

    It seems that the seed has borne fruits - and so, the "(hopefully)" is not anymore necessary.


    Could you please edit the title of the thread so that "(hopefully)" doesn't feature anymore?




    Thanks,



    mario/wroomwroomoops

  12. #287
    Administrator CbadRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    Dear moderators:

    I started this thread a few years back, hoping it would be a valuable resource for cyclists, with all sorts of neat tricks that would augment one's bicycle mechanics arsenal of knowledge.

    It seems that the seed has borne fruits - and so, the "(hopefully)" is not anymore necessary.


    Could you please edit the title of the thread so that "(hopefully)" doesn't feature anymore?




    Thanks,



    mario/wroomwroomoops
    Done.
    Quote Originally Posted by toddles View Post
    So Tom only hires people that are nutty? Is part of the requirement to be a moderator on this site is that you have to be nuts??
    Forum Guidelines *click here*

  13. #288
    Senior Member slide23's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rs1101 View Post
    tire wont seat correctly on your old rims? spray some pledge or simple green along the bead!
    Do not use Simple Green on aluminum. It attacks aluminum. If you absolutely must use SG on aluminum, there is a version specifically formulated for such use, Simple Green Aircraft if I recall correctly.
    "Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

  14. #289
    Senior Member slide23's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Zippy View Post
    Put a few disposable hand /wet/alcohol based wipes/sachets (i.e. the sealed ones you get from fast food restaurants that have a chemical smell) in your saddle bag, to use clean your hands if you have to put your chain back on the gears, or after any other dirty work you might need to do on a ride.

    Unfortunately I worked this out the hard way yesterday, and my white handle bar tape now isn't as white as it used to be.
    Don't get the grease on you in the first place. Pack a bunch of latex gloves in your repair bag. Put them in a ziploc bag so that nothing in your toolkit pokes holes in them. They compress down to nothing.

    And when you're done working on the bike on the roadside, the gloves serve well as a trash container: hold whatever dirty/greasy/nasty garbage in your hand and pull the glove off, turning it inside-out over the trash. Repeat with the other hand. Now it won't funkify your toolbag either.
    "Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

  15. #290
    Lost Again gitarzan's Avatar
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    Found this on the web.
    http://bike.shimano.com/publish/cont...ty%20Chart.pdf

    I found it useful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jseis View Post
    Is a ukulele player in a mandolin town and banned from all bars by the chief of police unless he leaves his strings and gravy at the front door.

  16. #291
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    Wow, that's complicated.
    You don't read my signature anyway, do you?

    Tom Reingold, noglider@pobox.com
    Residences: West Village, New York City and High Falls, NY
    Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

  17. #292
    Can'tre Member 3alarmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gitarzan View Post
    Found this on the web.
    http://bike.shimano.com/publish/cont...ty%20Chart.pdf

    I found it useful.
    Thanks. Incredibly valuable and, of course
    it goes without saying, absolutely insane.

    That one company could smilingly offer such
    a wide range of confusion in interchangeability
    says volumes about where we find ourselves
    these days in Bicycle World.
    Quote Originally Posted by CbadRider View Post
    Your friends on FB are very different than mine.

  18. #293
    Godbotherer dwellman's Avatar
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    Cosmetic tip:

    I found the grey/white-ish scuff marks in my saddle (badly scuffed) a bit annoying. If the leather is black (as in my case), you can "dye" the off-color leather with a black permanent marker and follow up with a leather wipe such as Weiman.

  19. #294
    Cottered Crank Amesja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noglider View Post
    That's excellent! I'll try it. I guess post-it flags would work, too, but they would cost more.
    Silk rag. Packs SMALL and light for a large rag. It makes cleaning up after a roadside repair job easier. I also carry a "wet nap" alcohol wipe for the times when you get even greasier than just patching a tube.

    A silk rag can be made out of an old silk blouse. If you don't have an old silk blouse that you need to throw away then buy a whole silk shirt from Goodwill, Salvation Army, or other resale shop for $2 and re-purpose it. You can make at least a half-dozen rags out of a $2 blouse -more if it was a size 20 blouse...
    '74 Raleigh Carlton Competition w/ Ultegra | '97 Trek 720 Singletrack CX-er w/ 105 | '64 Raleigh LTD-3 modernized w/ all alloy components |'69 Raleigh Twenty | '54 Raleigh Sports

  20. #295
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    My bike didn't come with reflectors on the front and back, so after a snowplow knocked some off of the road, I took them and pried the reflector bits off of their cases and glued them onto my bike. They've since fallen off, but if I you use a better adhesive than Dollar Tree superglue, it makes a great free repair.

  21. #296
    Godbotherer dwellman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feral Slug View Post
    My bike didn't come with reflectors on the front and back,
    I've used 3M reflective tape (r.g Conspicuity Film / Scotchlite. . also marketed as "Sidelights" in the early to mid 1990's). Not as good as a real light, but pretty good.
    "Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize"
    "So I do not run like someone who doesn't run toward the finish line. I do not fight like a boxer who hits nothing but air."
    "And let us run with endurance the race God has set before us."
    "I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith."

  22. #297
    Junior Member
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    I debated on getting some reflective tape, but then I realized that I hardly ever ride in the dark so I didn't want to pay for it.

  23. #298
    Senior Member Captain Blight's Avatar
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    (1) Set properly-toed brake pads very close to a very true rim, and 90% of brake problems go away

    (2) Cable tension is what actually moves the derailleur, and the derailleur will move just as far as the shifter tells it to

    (3) Pre-load bearings slightly (ca. 10% of expected load) when setting cups, cones, etc.

    (4) If all you're doing is enduring, you're not enjoying

    (5) keep it clean.
    '71 Raleigh Super Course ("Loose Change")
    '74 Raleigh Professional
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  24. #299
    Peripheral Visionary spock's Avatar
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    My tire levers



    Works like a charm. I use the smooth side, and yes those are from forks (or spoons, don't remember)

  25. #300
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    Vertical drops and fixed gear do not a happy bike make - my tip is forget about the imprecise half links, and skid-free tensioners/derailers, either suck it up and find a framebuilder to change your drops or get a new frame!

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