Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 14 of 21 FirstFirst ... 41213141516 ... LastLast
Results 326 to 350 of 512
  1. #326
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    West Village, New York City
    My Bikes
    too many
    Posts
    18,882
    Mentioned
    45 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Sounds like it helps you but wouldn't help me. I can install a tube quickly and easily, and I can't imagine anything making it quicker and easier. And no, you didn't sound sarcastic, so no worries there.
    Please email me rather than sending me a private message. My address is noglider@pobox.com

    Tom Reingold
    Residences: West Village, New York City and High Falls, NY
    Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

  2. #327
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    YEG
    My Bikes
    See my sig...
    Posts
    25,973
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by noglider View Post
    My understanding is that talc us an urban myth. It's a benign byproduct of the manufacturing, and at some point, cyclists thought that it's an improvement. I've never used it. Would I have fewer pinches if I used it? Well, that would be hard to measure, wouldn't it? I'd need to sample a whole lot of tube changes, with and without talc, and take a tally. In theory, if I know what I'm doing, I would never pinch a tube while installing it.
    Talc does help with installation... keeps the tube and tyre from sticking and often helps with seating the bead on the rim.

    Can install almost any tyre without it but through much experience prefer to use talc.

    For really difficult installations I have a spray bottle with diluted soap which makes things very slippery and doubles as hand cleaner and is good for light clean ups as well.

    Installed some Michelin Hi Lite folding tyres on my road bike this evening... would rate these as one of the more challenging mounting jobs I have done and as always, used talc.

  3. #328
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    YEG
    My Bikes
    See my sig...
    Posts
    25,973
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
    In extreme cases I am sure these techniques would come in very handy. I find most times resorting to a vise type device isn't necessary. In my experience the force generated across one hand is all that is necessary. It is amazing how much force you can exert between you palm and fingers, as much or more than with your arms in many cases. So if you arrange the pedal wrench so that it is about 30 degrees (more or less) to the "tight" side of the crank arm (how many degress depends on how big your hands are) and grasp both the wrench and crank arm in the same hand or even both hands, you can usually squeeze the wrench toward the crank arm and loosen it even in very stuck situations just by "closing" your hand. Easier of course on the non-drive side where the chain rings don't get in the way. But this does work on both sides. Good luck.
    Work on enough bikes and you will run into more challenging pedal removals than you would ever want to see... I service my pedals regularly and always ensure that every threaded interface gets a little anti seize so that when I, or someone else needs to take things apart extreme measures will not be needed.

    Since pedals self tighten gorilla force is not needed to install them either.

    Agree that your technique of using your hand strength is very effective and have had some very burly guys wonder how a small guy like me can break free fittings that they cannot budge.

  4. #329
    Senior Member Jed19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,756
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post
    Talc does help with installation... keeps the tube and tyre from sticking and often helps with seating the bead on the rim.
    This is the only instance I use Talc, in the form of a cheap baby powder I bought at The Dollar Store.

    I had found out that when I patch a tube, later I'll sometimes see the tube stick to the tire at the patch/tire contact. Now, after patching tubes, I'll dust that junction with baby powder, and no stickiness again.
    Regards,

    Jed

  5. #330
    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    NW Minnesota
    Posts
    2,544
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just found another handy tip, a popsicle (craft) stick is the perfect width to clean crud out from between you rear sprockets for 5-7 speed rear cogsets. I just sanded the right curve into the tip and it worked great. I don't have anything with more than seven rear sprockets but I suspect it would fit even narrower sprockets as there is still some free space. The sticks are just long enough to clean the big cogs without raking your fingers.

  6. #331
    Cottered Crank Amesja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    My Bikes
    1954 Raleigh Sports 1974 Raleigh Competition 1969 Raleigh Twenty 1964 Raleigh LTD-3
    Posts
    3,350
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That's a neat tip Myosmith although Schwinn or Bell makes a $2.50 brush set you can buy at Walmart for the freewheels/cassettes.
    '74 Raleigh Carlton Competition w/ Ultegra | '97 Trek 720 Singletrack CX-er w/ 105 | '64 Raleigh LTD-3 modernized w/ all alloy components |'69 Raleigh Twenty | '54 Raleigh Sports

  7. #332
    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    NW Minnesota
    Posts
    2,544
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The only brush set I've seen around here is the Park Tools set which is considerably more expensive. I've looked at a couple of Walmarts and other big box stores with no luck. The popsicle stick is more for removing mud, weeds, and assorted crud you pick up offroad or on bad unpaved roads. I ride a hybridized MTB so I gotta play in the rough sometimes.

  8. #333
    Cottered Crank Amesja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    My Bikes
    1954 Raleigh Sports 1974 Raleigh Competition 1969 Raleigh Twenty 1964 Raleigh LTD-3
    Posts
    3,350
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My Ross Mt Hood doesn't see much off-road action any more. I live in a huge city with no place to ride at MTB without car-ing it for hours. So it's been converted to a comfort roadster and is basically a Raleigh sports with a 7-speed IGH. No need to pick non-existent grass out of a non-existent freewheel

    But I used to live in WI and in the country. Did a lot of that at one time when the Mt. Hood was still a MTB.
    '74 Raleigh Carlton Competition w/ Ultegra | '97 Trek 720 Singletrack CX-er w/ 105 | '64 Raleigh LTD-3 modernized w/ all alloy components |'69 Raleigh Twenty | '54 Raleigh Sports

  9. #334
    Senior Member geej's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    hi / sf
    Posts
    92
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    bb pin spanner

    bb pin spanner.jpg

  10. #335
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    6
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rmfnla View Post
    Geez, 36 posts and nothing about making sure the beer is cold (& plentiful).

    What's the wrenching world coming to..?
    Its senses

  11. #336
    No Money and No Sense sillygolem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Anderson, MO
    Posts
    707
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Need something to prod, hammer, and cut stuff on your bike in your tool bag? Buy something that's designed to prod, hammer, and cut a barbed wire fence:

    You can pick one up for $10 or so, but if you want something to take with you on a ride you may want to skip the internet and hold a few models because the weight can vary from "set of pliers" to "uranium slug."
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrodzilla View Post
    I ride fixed because I'm mad at my parents. **** you Mom!

  12. #337
    Cottered Crank Amesja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    My Bikes
    1954 Raleigh Sports 1974 Raleigh Competition 1969 Raleigh Twenty 1964 Raleigh LTD-3
    Posts
    3,350
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think a pair of 9" linesman's pliers would be more all-around handy for the bike (and everything else) than just a fence nipper. But that's because I've got a bit of linesman in me -being a commercial electrician. This is my main go-to tool in my tool pouch. It's a rare day when I'm not carrying one at work. Having one in my bike tools is only natural.
    '74 Raleigh Carlton Competition w/ Ultegra | '97 Trek 720 Singletrack CX-er w/ 105 | '64 Raleigh LTD-3 modernized w/ all alloy components |'69 Raleigh Twenty | '54 Raleigh Sports

  13. #338
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,218
    Mentioned
    36 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My left brake-shifter lever was chattering over rough pavement. I checked it out and found that the main lever (SRAM) was slack due to the brake pivot bolt sticking. The brake return spring was not pulling the lever taut. A little WD40 on the pivot bolt fixed it right up. Been experiencing some hard riding when everything should be normal. Probably due to the same cause, the brake pad not returning and dragging on the rim.

  14. #339
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Maidstone, Kent, UK
    My Bikes
    Puch Brilliant 8 speed, Batavus Barcelona 3 speed
    Posts
    21
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    From another thread: you patched your tube, but the patch leaks? It wouldn't stick properly (or at all)?

    I had a few patches that wouldn't stick. Then I learned to clean the tube around the puncture with alcohol, and since then, all patches lasted forever. If you don't have a little bottle with alcohol with you while riding, a solution might be a little packed wet tovel (like those you get in the plane). Make sure the area around the puncture is perfectly dry and, above all, without grease. Any amount of grease or dust will cause the patch not to stick.

    Also, remember to wait for the glue (or "cement") to dry, before placing the patch over it, and then push on it like you're possessed.
    I use a small spring loaded woodworking clamp to hold it together for a while. I like the towelette idea. In fact I'm going to put some into my tool kit now!

  15. #340
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,218
    Mentioned
    36 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Danny1962 View Post
    I use a small spring loaded woodworking clamp to hold it together for a while. I like the towelette idea. In fact I'm going to put some into my tool kit now!
    Maybe better than towelettes and more like the original alcohol idea are the prepackaged alcohol swabs (tiny squares of gauze premoistened with rubbing alcohol for use in sterilizing the skin site for giving injections). They come in foil pouches about 1.5 inches square and are sold by the 100 at pharmacies. A couple of these would go along in your tool bag essentially unnoticed. But whichever of these you choose, it is also nice to have them along on a ride in the event of a crash and a case of road rash. Good to clean up the wound and sanitize it.

  16. #341
    Senior Member chadwebster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    West Coast
    My Bikes
    Centurion Ironman Expert, Bianchi Sport SX, SR Pro Racing, Vitus 979, Cannondale mountain bike, Schwinn Prologue TT Bike, Litespeed Tuscany, Principia Rex Pro (frame broke), Rossin (model unknown), Litespeed Classic, Schwinn prelude
    Posts
    547
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you need to true your rims but dont have a truing stand, you can tape pennies to the inside of your chainstay and fork and true them on the bike without messing up your brake adjustment

  17. #342
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you need to buff off some rust off older bikes, try this.

    If you've got an electric drill, take off the drill portion. Get some steel wool and wrap it around the spinning part of the drill. Leave some space so tape that you'll be wrapping around touched some of the actual drill. Cleans off rust like magic with minimal work. You can also expect less scratch marks if you use finer steel wool with this method rather than coarser steel wool by hand. Same time used, but less scratches.

    However, on more expensive bikes or new parts, this isn't recommended.

  18. #343
    Noob mikezs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Essex, UK
    My Bikes
    Specialized Rockhopper Expert Disc 2009, Giant Boulder 510 Sports 1999, Olympic Competitor 1978
    Posts
    71
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Trouble getting the PowerLINK, PowerLOCK, Missing link, quick release link, etc off your chain by hand?

    Try this: http://www.ctc.org.uk/resources/Magazine/201107050.pdf

    I don't think this has been posted yet (because I've read this whole thread) but sorry if it has!

  19. #344
    Bicycle Repairman kingsting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The Land of Three Mile Island
    My Bikes
    Many
    Posts
    565
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Myosmith View Post
    Just found another handy tip, a popsicle (craft) stick is the perfect width to clean crud out from between you rear sprockets for 5-7 speed rear cogsets. I just sanded the right curve into the tip and it worked great. I don't have anything with more than seven rear sprockets but I suspect it would fit even narrower sprockets as there is still some free space. The sticks are just long enough to clean the big cogs without raking your fingers.
    A flap from a corrugated cardboard box works well for crud cleaning between cogs too.
    There's always room for one more bike!

  20. #345
    Senior Member VertigoFlyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Balmy Snoqualmie WA
    My Bikes
    2011 Trek Madone 5.2, 2010 Trek Fuel EX 8
    Posts
    169
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by I_bRAD View Post
    When you're attaching your cleats to your shoes, especially with MTB shoes, fill the hex holes with melted wax (just drip it off a candle). Then, when it's time to tighten/adjust/replace your cleats all you have to do is melt the wax out with a lighter rather then spend 10mins chipping out 2 years worth of well packed clay.
    Brilliant!!

  21. #346
    Senior Member vredstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    My Bikes
    '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '98 Fuji Touring w/ Shimano Nexus premium, '06 Jamis Nova 853 cross frame set up as commuter, '03 Fuji Roubaix Pro 853 back up training bike
    Posts
    701
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Wheel building-Dropped the wrench!

    When building wheels, keep a couple alligator clips on hand. We've all dropped the spoke wrench, answered the phone, or checked out the MILF walking past the window only to discover the wheel has rotated in the stand while your eyes were diverted, and you have lost track of which spoke you were working on. As soon as you drop the spoke wrench, attach the clip to the exact spoke you were working on. Then you can take your eyes off the wheel, find the wrench, and if the wheel has rotated in the stand, you just find the spoke with the clip attached, and you haven't lost your place. The clip also works well for detecting spoke twist.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "See, it's not that getting wet is a big deal. Really, it's what you're getting wet with.
    Fenders....because it's probably urine."
    Bike Snob NYC

  22. #347
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,218
    Mentioned
    36 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by vredstein View Post
    When building wheels, keep a couple alligator clips on hand. We've all dropped the spoke wrench, answered the phone, or checked out the MILF walking past the window only to discover the wheel has rotated in the stand while your eyes were diverted, and you have lost track of which spoke you were working on. As soon as you drop the spoke wrench, attach the clip to the exact spoke you were working on. Then you can take your eyes off the wheel, find the wrench, and if the wheel has rotated in the stand, you just find the spoke with the clip attached, and you haven't lost your place. The clip also works well for detecting spoke twist.
    Bravo! I have always used masking tape "flags" for both indexing the spoke that I was working on and detecting spoke twist. The alligator clip is much simpler, not as messy, and easier to apply remove. Thanks.

  23. #348
    Senior Member vredstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    My Bikes
    '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '98 Fuji Touring w/ Shimano Nexus premium, '06 Jamis Nova 853 cross frame set up as commuter, '03 Fuji Roubaix Pro 853 back up training bike
    Posts
    701
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
    Bravo! I have always used masking tape "flags" for both indexing the spoke that I was working on and detecting spoke twist. The alligator clip is much simpler, not as messy, and easier to apply remove. Thanks.
    I started with masking tape on every spoke, but after rubbing my fingernails raw removing the tape and the residue, I vowed, "Never again". I mostly use the clip only when I have to take my eyes off the wheel. Using it on every spoke as I turn can be a pain repeatedly attaching and removing. I now use a black felt tip to mark the spokes at a spot directly on the line of site to detect twist in the initial phases of building when you're turning each spoke to get it up to tension. Cleans up easy with a rag and alcohol. Once tension is up and I'm making small adjustments to scattered spokes, I'll use the clip.
    "See, it's not that getting wet is a big deal. Really, it's what you're getting wet with.
    Fenders....because it's probably urine."
    Bike Snob NYC

  24. #349
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,218
    Mentioned
    36 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by vredstein View Post
    I started with masking tape on every spoke, but after rubbing my fingernails raw removing the tape and the residue, I vowed, "Never again". I mostly use the clip only when I have to take my eyes off the wheel. Using it on every spoke as I turn can be a pain repeatedly attaching and removing. I now use a black felt tip to mark the spokes at a spot directly on the line of site to detect twist in the initial phases of building when you're turning each spoke to get it up to tension. Cleans up easy with a rag and alcohol. Once tension is up and I'm making small adjustments to scattered spokes, I'll use the clip.
    Thanks. That is a good overall plan. Another positive for the felt tip marking is that you can place the mark up close to the nipple where the twist is most extreme and really see it well. I always found with the masking tape that I had to place it close to the hub to keep from interfering with the spoke wrench. Worked okay, but the twist is less down there than at the top. I appreciate the advice.

  25. #350
    Senior Member gavtatu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    the original jersey
    My Bikes
    lowracer, highracer, moving bottom bracket, 2 tall bikesl
    Posts
    286
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Myosmith View Post
    Shake n Bake your inner tubes. Well, OK, don't bake them but put them in a gallon ziplock bag with a small amount of talc, seal the bag and give it a good shake in several directions. Carefully pull the tube out of the bag tapping the excess talc back into the bag as you go. Viola, a perfectly powdered tube ready for installation with no mess, no dust in the air, on the floor, or on you. Wastes a lot less talc than trying to powder the tube by hand and you can save the talc in the bag for another tube.
    i just puff a bit of talc into the tire on the wheel, then rotate and shake, just seems a little easier to me !

Page 14 of 21 FirstFirst ... 41213141516 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •