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Old 05-21-12, 01:09 PM   #376
Amesja
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That really is the hard way.

I tie a loop in some red nylon binder twine, about in a 20cm Diameter circle.

Then double over the loop and loop that around the tire/wheel whatever and loop it through itself.

Hang the twine around a nail or hook in the rafters/ceiling.

Done.

Red binder twine costs about $20 for a mile of the stuff -lasts a lifetime and is plastic so it doesn't hold moisture much. It won't hurt the rim or tire or whatever you are hanging from it.
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Old 05-24-12, 10:47 AM   #377
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Yakima rack bars are 1-1/8 od and electrical EMT thin wall 1" size have the same OD. I made some 92" for mine .10' section is less than $5 & a78" yak bar is about $40+
they are plenty strong as long as you don't hang a bike out over 20" passed the tower!

Cheers
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Old 05-24-12, 11:26 AM   #378
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Zip ties, stash them everywhere oh and safety pins
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Old 05-24-12, 11:48 AM   #379
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Yakima rack bars are 1-1/8 od and electrical EMT thin wall 1" size have the same OD. I made some 92" for mine .10' section is less than $5 & a78" yak bar is about $40+
they are plenty strong as long as you don't hang a bike out over 20" passed the tower!

Cheers
EMT is quite malleable -to increase the PSI needed to deform and bend them fill them with "great stuff" self-expanding foam. It doesn't add much weight but makes them about 2x as resistant to bending as the foam needs to deform inside the conduit in order to allow the pipe to bend and the tightly-packed stuff does a good job of resisting deformation.
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Old 05-25-12, 11:11 AM   #380
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Originally Posted by Amesja View Post
That really is the hard way.

I tie a loop in some red nylon binder twine, about in a 20cm Diameter circle.

Then double over the loop and loop that around the tire/wheel whatever and loop it through itself.

Hang the twine around a nail or hook in the rafters/ceiling.

Done.

Red binder twine costs about $20 for a mile of the stuff -lasts a lifetime and is plastic so it doesn't hold moisture much. It won't hurt the rim or tire or whatever you are hanging from it.
I can't picture this. Can you shoot a picture for me?
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Old 05-25-12, 02:11 PM   #381
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I can't picture this. Can you shoot a picture for me?
Sure, Tom!

Here are some tires and a rim that are on my project list in my shop. Usually I will hang each tire or wheel up individually but these are grouped by project here. Out in my garage I've got dozens of wheels and tires hung up like this from the rafters. It keeps them organized and up off the ground.





The next time I dig into my garage I should take a picture of all the stuff I've got hanging like this. It's quick and easy to loop them up. All you need is a bunch of twine and some nails or hooks.
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Old 05-28-12, 06:23 AM   #382
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Originally Posted by Amesja View Post
That really is the hard way.

I tie a loop in some red nylon binder twine, about in a 20cm Diameter circle.

Then double over the loop and loop that around the tire/wheel whatever and loop it through itself.

Hang the twine around a nail or hook in the rafters/ceiling.

Done.

Red binder twine costs about $20 for a mile of the stuff -lasts a lifetime and is plastic so it doesn't hold moisture much. It won't hurt the rim or tire or whatever you are hanging from it.
Why is it the hard way? you have to use a hammer to put in a nail, I use an impact driver to put in two small screws. It takes less time than to tie the string.

Your way, when you want one tire, you have to take them all down, unwrap the string then put the rest back up. Me, I just pull down the wheel I want. But the point is moot, because your way is for tires, mine is for wheels.

Ian
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Old 06-01-12, 04:08 PM   #383
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An old guy told me if your chain breaks while you are out tie it together with a lace and pedal then back pedal then pedal and so on till you get home.
I have never had to do it but you never know.Another tip he gave me was if you get a puncture you can't fix put the tire beads around the outside of the rim
and you can get home almost as quickly as normal.I have done this and it does work but not kind to the rim or tire.
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Old 06-01-12, 05:13 PM   #384
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An old guy told me if your chain breaks while you are out tie it together with a lace and pedal then back pedal then pedal and so on till you get home.
I have never had to do it but you never know.Another tip he gave me was if you get a puncture you can't fix put the tire beads around the outside of the rim
and you can get home almost as quickly as normal.I have done this and it does work but not kind to the rim or tire.
Or you could just take the 2 extra links in your tool kit and your portable chain-breaker on your multi-tool and just fix the chain

Just sayin'
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Old 06-01-12, 08:17 PM   #385
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Or you could just take the 2 extra links in your tool kit and your portable chain-breaker on your multi-tool and just fix the chain

Just sayin'
He was talking about coming from a dance late at night in the forties with a girl on the cross bar.Bit like i've run out of gas baby How will we keep warm?
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Old 06-02-12, 09:05 AM   #386
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Teflon plumbers tape on derailuer set screws that wont stay put
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Old 06-23-12, 07:55 PM   #387
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Handlebar and frame protection tape

I have used 3M electrical tape for handlebar wrap jobs and protecting frames in various places in the past, but I had some of this stuff laying around and I thought "why not?". It is EPR tape, which has no adhesive. You stretch it around objects and it fuses to itself. It works great! It doesn't leave any sticky residue on cork tape, handlebars (if you use it to tie the brake cables) or on the frame--you just peel or cut it off and it's only stuck to itself. It holds its place by the pressure of the wrapping. It is slightly tacky-feeling at first (why I wouldn't wrap the entire handlebars in it) but I have used the same tape to wrap handles of other things and can report that the tackiness wears off over time. And as a bonus, it will protect you from up to 22,000 volts if you ever ride your bike into an electrical substation. Disadvantage is it's kind of expensive.

http://www.mcmaster.com/#epr-rubber-tape/=i3y3ho

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Old 06-23-12, 08:33 PM   #388
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+1 The self-fusing tape is pretty darn cool but it is darn expensive like you said -and not as easy to find. It's also harder to work with. You can find it at any electrical wholesale house though -not just McMaster Carr.


Here is an old electrician's trick to non-sticky electrical tape: Wrap it BACKWARDS (sticky side up) on the bar first -or whatever you are wrapping it around. Then wrap it again forward over the top of that. Make a tape sandwich with the stuff and the sticky stuff in the middle. Don't stretch it too much and it will stay put -or at least the nicer 3M super 33+ rubbery stuff will stay put. The cheaper vinyl tape is more slippery and will tend to migrate and slide around, but the good stuff will tack down and grip with the backside just as well as the self-fusing tape. And if you ever want to take it back off all you need to do is cut it carefully with an exacto knife from the inside out and it will cleanly come off without leaving a sticky mess beneath. Smart electricians back-wrap split-bolts and other large wire joints first so they can re-use the fastener someday when they take it apart instead of having a sticky gooey mess.

Make sure you don't over-stretch it as it will want to stretch back and pull and make a mess. And cut it at the end with a scissors carefully nice and straight. Don't just yank and tear it. That makes a crappy wrinkly end that will pull back up.
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Old 06-30-12, 05:55 AM   #389
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My issue with self-vulcanizing tape is that it tends to deform and becomes loose shortly after you put it on, and then it stays like that forever. Maybe I'm using the wrong brand.
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Old 07-02-12, 04:36 AM   #390
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I can see that happening with the brand I'm using. I think it just takes a lot of extra care before it fully cures/fuses to not loosen or wrinkle the cut edge. I have used it for a long time on handles of other things without any deformation.

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My issue with self-vulcanizing tape is that it tends to deform and becomes loose shortly after you put it on, and then it stays like that forever. Maybe I'm using the wrong brand.
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Old 07-02-12, 06:24 AM   #391
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That really is the hard way.
Totally depends on whether you occasionally hang up a pair of wheels, or if you're always doing it. In a shop, your way is the hard way and the broom holders are well worth the effort of installation.

Last edited by Kimmo; 07-02-12 at 06:28 AM.
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Old 07-17-12, 06:12 AM   #392
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I cut short lengths of innertubes and pull them over handlebar grips. Gives extra padding and keeps grips like new. When they get grungy just toss and replace.Use thornless tubes for extra cushioning. Bike shops will give away old tubes.
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Old 07-23-12, 09:45 PM   #393
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Excellent tip. I'll remember that one and hope I never have to use it. Thanks again.
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Old 07-23-12, 10:07 PM   #394
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Smart Tip! I'll remember this and hope I don't have to use it.
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Old 07-30-12, 08:20 AM   #395
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Great tips,
Thanks
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Old 07-30-12, 10:47 PM   #396
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when installing a tube make sure that the valve is in the middle of the largest label on the side of the tire... "it looks professional and will help you to locate the source of flats" - the art of wheelbuilding
I have been installing the valve stem where the max tire pressure is stamped. I can still locate the source of flats but now when me or the owner is checking tire pressure, the max and minimums are right where the valve stem is.

Last edited by mike_khad1; 07-31-12 at 05:55 PM.
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Old 08-01-12, 08:51 AM   #397
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Grip removal: Use an air compressor with a blow gun to remove MTB or BMX grips without destroying them. Works best if you have a blow gun with a long nozzle.

Brake adjustment: For setting v brakes and u brakes without a third hand tool use a woodworking clamp to lock the brake pads against the rim. Insert thin cardboard scraps as shims between the brake pad and the rim if you want to create a perfect fit the first time. The $3 clamp/spreaders with the nylon covers that Harbor Freight often gives away work really great for this.
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Old 08-01-12, 09:12 AM   #398
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Grip removal: Use an air compressor with a blow gun to remove MTB or BMX grips without destroying them. Works best if you have a blow gun with a long nozzle.
Another way to get grips off -especially old vintage grips that have "glued" themselves to the bars over time is to use Tri-Flow.

I take a long small control-wiring flat screwdriver to carefully insert into the front of the grip and slide back under it. Then I put the long red straw of the Tri-Flow in next to the screwdriver shaft as far back into the grip as I can and squirt in the oil. If you can do this 2-3 more times around the diameter of the grip you can pretty much get most of the grip lubricated. Then it is a simple matter to carefully work and twist the grip until it breaks free and just slides off.

Soak the oily grip in a pan o blue Dawn detergent and the Tri-Flow washes right off and you are left with a good undamaged vintage grip that is ready to be re-installed later.
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Old 08-01-12, 12:09 PM   #399
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The screwdriver and lube trick is pretty obvious, done it a zillion times... but that compressor trick is a bloody beauty.

As for third hands... not worth the trouble if you're good enough with two.
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Old 08-01-12, 03:09 PM   #400
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Another way to get grips off -especially old vintage grips that have "glued" themselves to the bars over time is to use Tri-Flow.

I take a long small control-wiring flat screwdriver to carefully insert into the front of the grip and slide back under it. Then I put the long red straw of the Tri-Flow in next to the screwdriver shaft as far back into the grip as I can and squirt in the oil. If you can do this 2-3 more times around the diameter of the grip you can pretty much get most of the grip lubricated. Then it is a simple matter to carefully work and twist the grip until it breaks free and just slides off.

Soak the oily grip in a pan o blue Dawn detergent and the Tri-Flow washes right off and you are left with a good undamaged vintage grip that is ready to be re-installed later.
MUCH better to do this with alcohol (ethanol or iso-propanol, doesn't matter). In fact, by far the simplest solution is to use a syringe with a long enough needle to inject a bit of alcohol between the grip and the handlebar. Once you've removed the grip, the alcohol will quickly evaporate.
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