Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 2 of 22 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 532
  1. #26
    Bikes are good El Julioso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Canada
    My Bikes
    2000 Schwinn Moab 1, heavily modified
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by halfspeed View Post
    It's a good idea to keep bearings and screws in a container, like an old ash tray, so they don't roll away.
    I use a Park Tool MB-1 for this purpose. It's a bowl with a very strong magnet attached (strong enough to magnetize your tools if you so desire). You can throw it across the room with a load of bearings in it and they won't go anywhere

  2. #27
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by El Julioso View Post
    I use a Park Tool MB-1 for this purpose. It's a bowl with a very strong magnet attached (strong enough to magnetize your tools if you so desire). You can throw it across the room with a load of bearings in it and they won't go anywhere
    You can get magnetic parts bowls at Sears in a couple of different sizes, sometimes for $10 or so if they're having a sale. Don't know how I ever got along without one!

  3. #28
    Goggles & Doo-rag ready! Road_Biker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Hampton Roads, VA
    Posts
    48
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Clean the bicycle really well before work is done. Take the time to wash (and maybe even wax) the bike. It's time well spent.

  4. #29
    Healthy and active twobikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Caldwell, Idaho USA
    My Bikes
    mid-60's Dunelt 10-speed, Specialized Allez Sport Tripple, Trek 7.2 FX
    Posts
    887
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When your tire with Schrader valve goes flat overnight seemingly for no reason, check to see if the valve core is not tight in the stem. Do this before removing the wheel from the bike and taking the tire off.
    Who am I?
    Where did I come from?
    Why am I here?
    Where am I going?

  5. #30
    Healthy and active twobikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Caldwell, Idaho USA
    My Bikes
    mid-60's Dunelt 10-speed, Specialized Allez Sport Tripple, Trek 7.2 FX
    Posts
    887
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You put your seat back onto your bike and eyeballed it to get it straight, but when you ride the nose of the seat rubs one leg more than the other. When you put the seat back on, pull a piece of string taught from the center rear of the seat to the center of your stearer tube. This is much more precise than eyeballing it.
    Who am I?
    Where did I come from?
    Why am I here?
    Where am I going?

  6. #31
    Healthy and active twobikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Caldwell, Idaho USA
    My Bikes
    mid-60's Dunelt 10-speed, Specialized Allez Sport Tripple, Trek 7.2 FX
    Posts
    887
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I had some heavy wheel bearing grease from the days when an automobile required the owner to repack the front wheel bearings periodically. I stirred a little motor oil into the grease until it was the right consistency for bicycle wheel bearings.
    Who am I?
    Where did I come from?
    Why am I here?
    Where am I going?

  7. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    60
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When replacing a flat, or just putting a tire together, rubbing talc powder in the tire will help prevent pinch flats.

    Also, when putting a tire back on the rim, spraying the outside of the rim and the outside of the sidewall with Windex (or another quickly-evaporating liquid) will make your tire tool run more smoothly as you fit the tire back on.

    When lacing a wheel, if you find that the second side spokes are too short/long (and you calculated the appropriate length beforehand), the initial spoke on the 2nd side is either in the wrong hole (hub or rim end), or facing the wrong direction.

    Small clicks/rubs/etc that happen once per revolution aren't necessarily the drive train. Check your shoe laces, clip straps, tool pouch, streamers, computer to make sure you aren't hitting it.

    If you are trying to take a cassette off, the easiest way is to mount the cassette/freewheel tool in a bench vice, place the wheel on the tool, and turn the wheel (like the steering wheel on a school bus).

    When tightening pedals, you can use the crank arm and the wrench to make a fulcrum - this gives you great leverage.
    2002 Lemond Tourmalet
    2006 Marin Kentfield
    2007 Windsor "The Hour"

  8. #33
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by trich View Post
    When replacing a flat, or just putting a tire together, rubbing talc powder in the tire will help prevent pinch flats.


    And if you don't have talk, you can use cocoa powder- tested, and it works. Be it talk, or cocoa powder, I'd recommend rubbing it onto the tube. It's just simpler to do it evenly.

    Quote Originally Posted by trich View Post
    When tightening pedals, you can use the crank arm and the wrench to make a fulcrum - this gives you great leverage.
    To increase the torx on the wrench (sometimes necessary when removing pedals that are stuck (in which case some WD-40 or teflon oil will help, too)), you can use a much bigger (about 24 mm or more) box-end wrench (USA) or ring spanner (UK) - put the end of the first wrench into the ring of the bigger.
    Last edited by wroomwroomoops; 08-27-07 at 11:04 AM.

  9. #34
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Do clean the wheel, especially the tire, before replacing or fixing/patching a tube. If you have the opportunity, wash it with with water, even. This will hopefully prevent dirt and debris to get inside the tire, which then may cause unexplained flats later on.

  10. #35
    Call me The Breeze I_bRAD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Corbyville Ontario
    My Bikes
    2004 Litespeed Siena, 1996 Litespeed Obed, 1992 Miele (unknown model), 1982 Meile Uno LS.
    Posts
    3,699
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by trich View Post

    When tightening pedals, you can use the crank arm and the wrench to make a fulcrum - this gives you great leverage.
    Yeah, way more leverage than you need to tighten pedals! This technique is pretty useful for tightening the crank bolt though

  11. #36
    Call me The Breeze I_bRAD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Corbyville Ontario
    My Bikes
    2004 Litespeed Siena, 1996 Litespeed Obed, 1992 Miele (unknown model), 1982 Meile Uno LS.
    Posts
    3,699
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by twobikes View Post
    You put your seat back onto your bike and eyeballed it to get it straight, but when you ride the nose of the seat rubs one leg more than the other. When you put the seat back on, pull a piece of string taught from the center rear of the seat to the center of your stearer tube. This is much more precise than eyeballing it.
    Nice one

  12. #37
    Sometimes knows stuff. rmfnla's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    La La Land (We love it!)
    My Bikes
    Gilmour road, Curtlo road
    Posts
    2,538
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Geez, 36 posts and nothing about making sure the beer is cold (& plentiful).

    What's the wrenching world coming to..?
    Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...

  13. #38
    Healthy and active twobikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Caldwell, Idaho USA
    My Bikes
    mid-60's Dunelt 10-speed, Specialized Allez Sport Tripple, Trek 7.2 FX
    Posts
    887
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The pin in my chain tool comes out and I could easily lose it. I always keep the tool and its pin in a sandwich bag.

    I have a generic crank removal tool. I tried a small square of steel to keep the plunger from pushing into the threads for the crank bolt. My preference is a short piece of steel rod cut to length so its end protrudes a millimeter or so beyond the threads when inserted in the bolt hole. The diameter of the rod all but fills the hole for the bolt.

    If you are confused about whether something, like a pedal, is right hand or left hand thread; just think about whether friction from its natural rotation in use would tighten or loosen the threads. Designers always make machinery so bolts naturally tighten a bit in use. No one wants their stuff falling apart for no good reason.

    The binding collar from a rear reflector or a taillight is just enough to keep a slipping seat post from sliding down during a ride. Mount it just above the seat post collar.

    Winter clothing with wicking properties is a lot cheaper in a common sporting goods department than at most bicycle supply houses.

    Cotton Jersey gloves inside a larger than necessary pair of leather gloves keep hands warm in many winter termperatures.

    Plastic food bags over your socks before you put your shoes on hold in a bit of extra warmth for your feet in the winter.

    If you lose the instruction sheet or manual for a piece of equipment, it is probably available as a download somewhere on the Internet. Look at some catalogs. You may even see your unit with a different brand name on it. The manual may be available under the different brand name. My Schwinn cyclometer is also marketed as an Ascent. I was able to download a manaul for an Ascent that even looks exactly like my Schwinn manual.

    WD-40 on a rag cleans up many greasy things on a bicycle.

    An air tank is a great way to inflate bicycle tires. Just pump the tank up the the required pressure and there is no guessing about when the tire is at the proper pressure. Most air tanks have a pressure gauge on them.

    For extra safety at night, cut some reflective tape to fit parts of your helmet and apply it. Some reflective tape is silver, not just red. (Some helmets claim adhesives could change the chemical composition of the protective material, but mine has not changed.)

    Put a label on your helmet or your bike that gives your name, address, phone, blood type, and a contact number in case you are knocked unconscious in a crash.

    When a bare brake cable flutters against the frame it makes a distracting noise. Get a piece of automotive vacuum hose an inch long. Slice it lengthwise in a spiral pattern. Wrap it around the cable near the middle of its run and tape the hose to the frame tube.
    Who am I?
    Where did I come from?
    Why am I here?
    Where am I going?

  14. #39
    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Pagosa Springs, CO, USA
    My Bikes
    Road, MTB, Cruiser, Chopper, BMX
    Posts
    2,900
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If your beer gets warm, fill a tray with ice and water, add a good amount of salt and then spin the cans or bottles in the tray. Icy cold in just a few minutes.

    Better yet, just ride to the brewery.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
    Ski, bike and wish I was gay.

  15. #40
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    26,143
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by twobikes View Post
    If you are confused about whether something, like a pedal, is right hand or left hand thread; just think about whether friction from its natural rotation in use would tighten or loosen the threads. Designers always make machinery so bolts naturally tighten a bit in use. No one wants their stuff falling apart for no good reason.
    Thinking about this "logically" will lead you to the wrong conclusion. For example, English drive-side bottom bracket cups loosen by turning clockwise and the drive-side crank and spindle also turn clockwise so you would conclude the cranking motion would loosen them. Obviously it doesn't.

    What you have to realize is that while the crank is turning clockwise the bearing balls inside are rotating the opposite way and that motion tends to keep the cup tight.

  16. #41
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There's a noise while turning the handlebars, but it isn't the headset. In fact, you're not even on the bike, and yet, there's still noise when the handlebars turn.

    One possible source could be the brake cables rubbing against each other. And a possible solution is to apply a very little bit of chain oil where the cables touch.
    Last edited by wroomwroomoops; 08-22-07 at 07:41 PM.

  17. #42
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    From another thread: you patched your tube, but the patch leaks? It wouldn't stick properly (or at all)?

    I had a few patches that wouldn't stick. Then I learned to clean the tube around the puncture with alcohol, and since then, all patches lasted forever. If you don't have a little bottle with alcohol with you while riding, a solution might be a little packed wet tovel (like those you get in the plane). Make sure the area around the puncture is perfectly dry and, above all, without grease. Any amount of grease or dust will cause the patch not to stick.

    Also, remember to wait for the glue (or "cement") to dry, before placing the patch over it, and then push on it like you're possessed.

  18. #43
    Obeying Gravity
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Bellingham, WA
    Posts
    2,962
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If it's stuck, get the Dremel.

  19. #44
    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Pagosa Springs, CO, USA
    My Bikes
    Road, MTB, Cruiser, Chopper, BMX
    Posts
    2,900
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you're stuck on a plane, those little bottles of alcohol can lubricate you to a happy state.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
    Ski, bike and wish I was gay.

  20. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    60
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    There's a noise while turning the handlebars, but it isn't the headset.

    One possible source could be the brake cables rubbing against each other. And a possible solution is to apply a very little bit of chain oil where the cables touch.
    This could also be improperly tensioned spokes on the front wheel. For me, it was more of a feeling or vibration coming up through the bike, but there was definitely a noise associated with it, too.
    2002 Lemond Tourmalet
    2006 Marin Kentfield
    2007 Windsor "The Hour"

  21. #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    60
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MattP. View Post
    If it's stuck, get the Dremel.
    or the "blue wrench"
    2002 Lemond Tourmalet
    2006 Marin Kentfield
    2007 Windsor "The Hour"

  22. #47
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by trich View Post
    This could also be improperly tensioned spokes on the front wheel. For me, it was more of a feeling or vibration coming up through the bike, but there was definitely a noise associated with it, too.
    Improperly tensioned spokes usually make a noise easily recognisable, because it's periodic - at every turn of the wheel. Not saying your case is not possible, just that there's another symptom to it, too.

    Besides, in the example I cited, there doesn't need to be any weight on the handlebars and front wheel, the noise will still be produced. So, there are various ways to distinguish "my" case from "yours".
    Last edited by wroomwroomoops; 08-22-07 at 07:41 PM.

  23. #48
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    853
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by twobikes View Post
    You put your seat back onto your bike and eyeballed it to get it straight, but when you ride the nose of the seat rubs one leg more than the other. When you put the seat back on, pull a piece of string taught from the center rear of the seat to the center of your stearer tube. This is much more precise than eyeballing it.

    If the saddle has an ergonomic split, you can just lay a broomstick in the groove and line it up with the steerer, or kneel behind the bike and sight down the centerline of the groove until it's centered on the steerer (this might also work using the seat rails as a guide...I'm not sure)

  24. #49
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    North Carolina
    My Bikes
    1970 Raleigh Record (daily rider), 1967 Raleigh Sports, 1973 Motobecane Mirage (commuter)
    Posts
    135
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Hints and tricks thread (hopefully)

    My tip: WD-40 is a Water Displacer, not a penetrating oil. For stuck parts, get some Kroil or PB B'Laster.
    1970 Raleigh Record (my first "real" bike and current rider)
    1973 Motobecane Mirage (commuter mule)
    1967 Raleigh Sports

  25. #50
    Sometimes knows stuff. rmfnla's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    La La Land (We love it!)
    My Bikes
    Gilmour road, Curtlo road
    Posts
    2,538
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Thinking about this "logically" will lead you to the wrong conclusion. For example, English drive-side bottom bracket cups loosen by turning clockwise and the drive-side crank and spindle also turn clockwise so you would conclude the cranking motion would loosen them. Obviously it doesn't.

    What you have to realize is that while the crank is turning clockwise the bearing balls inside are rotating the opposite way and that motion tends to keep the cup tight.
    No.

    A rotating shaft (pedal axle, BB spindle) exhibits orbital motion in the direction opposite to its rotation.

    If the balls are generating enough friction to affect a properly tightened pedal or BB someone needs to learn how to adjust bearings.
    Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...

Page 2 of 22 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •