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Old 12-18-07, 12:04 AM   #101
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Use a calibrated torque wrench for shiny, expensive carbon components.
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Old 12-24-07, 09:43 AM   #102
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have trouble getting rear wheels in frame? file the corners on the front of the rear dropouts.,wait till you see how easy it is to get that wheel in and out!
you got to elaborate on this. I'm not sure I think this is suck a great idea.
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Old 12-24-07, 10:50 AM   #103
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you got to elaborate on this. I'm not sure I think this is suck a great idea.
I have had the locknuts on an axle bind on the front end of a stay. It might have helped if the front end of the stay had been rounded at the corners of the stampings instead of blunt. Then the locknuts would more easily have slipped around the end of the stay and into the axle slot. I am guessing that is what he is talking about.
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Old 12-27-07, 05:19 AM   #104
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A few more tips, I might have read one or two of them a while back so I can't remember if I came up with them or not.

* For scratches on your frame, use clear nail polish. Or, with the varieties of nail polish colours available, you'd probably be able to find a close match or an exact match.

* If you're a male, get your sister or some other female to buy the nail polish - you don't want the shop assistants (or Arny) thinking you're a "girly man" - they might not believe your "it's for my bike" story. If you do venture into the shop yourself, instead of getting a friendly female to do it, make sure you aren't wearing your dress, stockings and high heels. Keep them for the weekend.

* Where brake or gear cables rub on the frame and therefore the paint, put a piece of electrical/electricians tape underneath the contact point. Replace it when it's nearly worn through. There are a variety of colours of this tape, so you might also be able to find a match to your frame colour. Alternatively, a few coats of nail polish would also do the job protecting the frame.

* Kerosene is a good degreaser, because it doesn't evaporate very much at all (i.e. you can leave it to soak for a night or a week), and can be reused a number of times. You have to thoroughly wash the cleaned part with warm water and dish washing soap afterwards though. To get more life out of the used kerosene you can run it through a few coffee drip filter papers sitting in a funnel.

* Kerosene makes your fingers stink. When your friends notice, pretend it's the new fragrance from Diesel.

* If you don't use a lot of kerosene, buy it at the supermarket not the hardware store - I've found it significantly cheaper at the super market. It's also much cheaper than fragrances from Diesel, even if you do buy it from the hardware store.

* A small sieve used to hold loose tea leaves on the top of a cup or mug can make cleaning ball bearings easy when used with a short stubby jar it fits in the top of. I've found nacho dip and similar jars are pretty good. Sit the sieve on top of the jar, pour kerosene into the jar through the sieve until it is halfway up the sieve side or so, and then add the ball bearings or other small parts. Swish them around inside the sieve with a small paint brush. Take the sieve out with the ball bearings in it and drop them onto a rag, to easily get them out and dry them. Pour the kerosene back into your "dirty kero" bottle for further reuse.

* The lid of the nacho dip jars also make good screw/bearing etc. trays for your work bench.

* The contents of the nacho dip jar when you originally buy it makes nachos more tasty.

* Nacho dip; is there anything it can't do?

* If you need to protect one or both ends of your water bottle cage mounted air pump from mud and dirt, cut a bit of old tube a bit longer than the required length. Twist the end of piece of tube tightly, then use a small cable tie to tie it off (remembering to cut off the slack off of the cable tie - you don't also want a poke in the eye while trying to fix a flat tyre.) Slide the open end of the tube over end of the air pump. Depending on your environment, it might perish reasonably quickly. However, they're quick and easy to make, and a good way to get more use out of those old tubes.

Last edited by Mr Zippy; 12-27-07 at 05:22 AM. Reason: spelling error
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Old 12-30-07, 04:37 AM   #105
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to thorn proof my tires i make a sleeve from old tubes and put that around my tubes,havnet had one flat yet and have rode across many bindies and glass
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Old 12-30-07, 04:40 AM   #106
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to work on my bike fast and remove both tires i lift whole bike up on a rope
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Old 12-30-07, 04:49 AM   #107
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if you keep getting frayed brake cables from over tightening next time you buy one apply some solder along it for a few inches where you tighten it.
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Old 12-31-07, 12:56 PM   #108
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I've taken a serving tray, like the ones you get a Mikey D's or BK, and glued some waffle mat (shelf liner) found at the .99 cent store, to the tray. Now when I am removing ball bearings from either wheel hubs or the headset I make sure this tray is under what I am taking apart. If any ball bearings fall out they fall on this tray and not all over my garage floor. The remainder of the waffle mat can also be used to line the drawers of tool boxes so the tools don't slide around too much. Needless to say it is not earthquake strong.
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Old 01-01-08, 07:17 AM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Zippy View Post
* Nacho dip; is there anything it can't do?
Nice ideas. Just one question, though: what is a Nacho dip? Please be broad-minded; some of us live in countries where such stuff may not exist or is rare.

EDIT: if you have a picture of a Nacho dip, it will help a lot if you could include it or link to it.
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Old 01-01-08, 10:40 AM   #110
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I swear I saw some posts in this thread about chemicals that can be used to remove rust from parts but perhaps it was in another thread. Anyway, I had been meaning to post that if you don't have or can't find any of those chemicals, anything with a lot of citric acid in it, like orange juice, will quickly strip the surface rust off steel parts. My dad showed me this trick for cleaning up some small parts on an old car I was working on. Citric acid is also used as an enviromentally friendly chemical for passivation by companies like the one I work for. Passivation uses chemicals to remove the steel residue left on parts from the machining process so that they do not exhibit surface rust even though the base material is not rusting.
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Old 01-01-08, 12:06 PM   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
Nice ideas. Just one question, though: what is a Nacho dip? Please be broad-minded; some of us live in countries where such stuff may not exist or is rare.

EDIT: if you have a picture of a Nacho dip, it will help a lot if you could include it or link to it.
Tortilla - Thin pancake like bread from the Americas make from ground corn since fire came into use. In Spain an omelet.

Nacho - Tortilla cut or broken into pieces and deep fried also a dish of tortilla chips with cheese and chili's applied and toasted. Also a male nickname in Mexico.

Nacho dip - Something to dip nachos into. Salsa made with chile's or a cheese dip made with chiles. I personally like peanut butter but it's not commonly thought of as nacho dip. Also a sort of insult to a person named Nacho. In this case dip is short for dips**t.

Salsa - Commonly a chunky sauce made with the main ingredient of chili's and other vegetables. Can be fresca(fresh) or cooked and is sometimes cooked down to a thick sauce. Can be very hot or bland and anything in between.

Picture is of Nachos with dip applied.

Not very good for cleaning parts or rust proofing but the jars, cans and lids are handy for small parts.
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Old 01-01-08, 04:18 PM   #112
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I swear I saw some posts in this thread about chemicals that can be used to remove rust from parts but perhaps it was in another thread. Anyway, I had been meaning to post that if you don't have or can't find any of those chemicals, anything with a lot of citric acid in it, like orange juice, will quickly strip the surface rust off steel parts. My dad showed me this trick for cleaning up some small parts on an old car I was working on. Citric acid is also used as an enviromentally friendly chemical for passivation by companies like the one I work for. Passivation uses chemicals to remove the steel residue left on parts from the machining process so that they do not exhibit surface rust even though the base material is not rusting.

For further reading/thinking: most any acid will remove rust - because rust is (mostly) ferric oxide, Fe2O3, and reacts with (and is dissolved by) even such weak acids such as carbonic acid - present in sodas and Coke and such.

The most common acid used for rust removal is phosphoric acid.
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Old 01-01-08, 05:18 PM   #113
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Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
Nice ideas. Just one question, though: what is a Nacho dip? Please be broad-minded; some of us live in countries where such stuff may not exist or is rare.
I was trying to be a bit general, basically salsa sauce, or any other condiment that you can dip corn chips into - typically right next to the corn chips in the supermarket.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
EDIT: if you have a picture of a Nacho dip, it will help a lot if you could include it or link to it.
Here's an example of what I was talking about. There are other brands that use the same or similar jar. The jar is meant to be used for dipping the chips into, so the mouth of the jar is wide, and I've found it's around the same size as a tea leaf sieve. They're also not that deep, so you don't have to pour all that much kerosene into it before the kero reaches the bottom of the sieve mesh.


http://www.mygroceryshop.com.au/inde...ducts_id=10686
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Old 01-12-08, 01:57 AM   #114
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Shimano Rear Derailleur Compatibility Chart:

Road SS ("short" cage)............Double chainring....27T or smaller cassette
Road GS ("medium"/"long").....Triple chainring.......27T or smaller cassette
MTB GS ("short"/"medium").....Double chainring.....28T or larger cassette
MTB SGS ("long" cage)............Triple chainring........28T or larger cassette

Models are "upwardly" compatible (that is, a given model will also work with the setups listed above it).

The chart is just a quick, general reference, but be mindful of and don't exceed the "Total Capacity"* of the RD. For example, 50/34T compact cranks have a larger tooth difference than 53/39T and 50/36T, so a Road GS model may be necessary if you're using anything wider than a 12-25T road cassette.

Be aware that most MTB RDs have a 34T largest cog limit, but some smaller, like 30T (Shimano Alivio).

*Capacity (in teeth) = [(largest chainring + largest cog) - (smallest chainring + smallest cog)]
E.g.: The Total Capacity of a Shimano road SS RD is 29T >= [(53+27) - (39+12)], or [(50+27) - (36+12)], or [(50+25) - (34+12)], or [(50+25) - (34+12), etc.]

Edit: In the chart above, Single chainring can be substituted for Double chainring.

Edit2: The large-cog capacity of a road RD can often be exceeded with ease (but may lead to the RD bumping into the cog in the lowest gear--often with a triple crank). Also, the chain wrap capacity can be exceeded, but it will render some gear combinations unusable (the small chainring ans smaller cog combos, which shouldn't be used anyway).

Last edited by JiveTurkey; 04-28-10 at 05:19 PM.
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Old 01-13-08, 07:22 AM   #115
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I had to remove a freewheel, but a larger nut on the axle kept my removal tool from reaching the freewheel, and I could not loosen the nut. With the points of a thin nose plier as a spanner wrench I turned the retaining ring out (left hand thread). I gently pulled the gear cluster off of the freewheel body while holding the wheel over a large pan to catch the bearing balls. Then I put a pipe wrench on the freewheel body and it came right off with very little pressure and no damage from the pipe wrench. I plan to reassemble the freewheel and use it again if I need to.
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Old 01-23-08, 03:56 AM   #116
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For rust removal rub the part with aluminum foil dipped in vinegar.

Any decent magnet in a tin can will do for retaining small parts. Magnets can be removed from old speakers, magnetic items, or purchased from Radio Shack or hardware stores. A washer or large nut can be used to hold a magnet in a plastic or aluminum container.

When mixing epoxy etc mix it well and never scrape the mixing container or surface. The material next to the surface may not be mixed well or in the proper proportions.

Use anti-seize on any joint or surface between dissimilar materials.

Heat releases Loctite.

Silicone dielectric grease available in very small to large tubes from auto supply stores works well as a corrosion inhibitor and for waterproofing electrical connections. Dip the ends of wires in the grease before crimping them into connectors. It also works as a decent field lubricant.

Alcohol prep pads available at any drugstore work great to clean tubes before patching. They are easy to store in a tool kit.

Emery boards, the type used for nail files, work well for abrading the surface of tubes before patching.

Don't over inflate tubes while checking for leaks. They can stretch and fold inside the tire when reused. The wrinkles can rub and cause a flat.

Tire sealants will ruin the pencil type pressure gauges. They will also adhere a tube to a tire fairly well.

A piece of carpet under your work area can keep parts from escaping the area.

A simple piece of rope tied to a hook in a ceiling or rafter can be used to suspend a bike so it is easier to work on.

Small plastic zip-lock bags are great for keeping parts together. A Sharpie marker works well for labeling them.

When taking things apart take LOTS of pictures.

Last edited by Torque1st; 01-23-08 at 04:02 AM.
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Old 02-03-08, 07:05 PM   #117
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GREASE is not always the word

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Grease (or use anti-seize compound) on all metal-metal contacts. I'm not gonna touch the BB spindle issue, you figure that out yourself.
Not entirely correct!
NO GREASE between threadless stem steerer clamp and steerer (both metal)!
NO GREASE on square-taper BB spindles (clean n dry) but, yes on splined spindles!
NO GREASE on almost all drivetrain pivots and chain (I hope y'all knew THAT!)
Special Freehub Grease inside Freehubs.
V. Light Grease on cablesets
Grease not best on spoke nipples --->BOILED LINSEED OIL is proven to be best and most economical too.
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Old 02-03-08, 07:23 PM   #118
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ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL is an excellent cleaning agent. Safe. Non-reactive. Proven. Cheap. Available. Get it!
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Old 02-03-08, 07:53 PM   #119
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Not entirely correct!
NO GREASE between threadless stem steerer clamp and steerer (both metal)!
NO GREASE on square-taper BB spindles (clean n dry) but, yes on splined spindles!
NO GREASE on almost all drivetrain pivots and chain (I hope y'all knew THAT!)
Special Freehub Grease inside Freehubs.
V. Light Grease on cablesets
Grease not best on spoke nipples --->BOILED LINSEED OIL is proven to be best and most economical too.
No grease but I always use anti-seize on square-taper BB spindles.
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Old 02-08-08, 08:07 AM   #120
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Hi, Im new to this but i need a Chainwheel 36 or 38T 5 holes 69.4mm c to c i believe its 118 BCD if anyone can help id really appreiate it Thanks.
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Old 02-09-08, 07:24 PM   #121
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There was a post somewhere about building a calliper accurate truing stand for less than $100US. Damned if I can find it. I thought this was a fun project and a great tip. Another I know is to buy a dremel or engraver and mark all of your tools! I've spent so much over the years and had them walk away. Tools, knives, etc. Mark it. Oh and there are loads of greases and syn-petro product that you can mix yourself or use straight for less than the big names. They often work better and for longer too.
I live in Florida and it rains forever, a decent space heater and an emergency blanket work great for drying out your bike and gear.
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Old 02-09-08, 10:49 PM   #122
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A person can build a decent truing stand for a very few bucks. I saw one of these in a person's garage and it looked like it worked well. Grab a used front fork from a junker. Split the head tube into three or four pieces. Bend them outward. Flatten the ends, drill a hole in each of the strips, and screw them drown into a block of wood. Clamp the wood on a worktable. Drill a few holes through the arms. Insert some bent up all thread (1/4-20 works well) through the holes. Bend them sharply in a "crank" shape. Secure them with a hex nut on the inside and a wing nut on the outside. Mark the hex nut with a file to keep track of turns. Adjust the all thread arms as required to clear the rim. Rotate the "cranks" for OD measurements. Loosen the wing nuts and adjust the hex nuts for lateral runout.
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Old 02-10-08, 09:21 PM   #123
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Well, my truing stand costs 0 $.
I simply install and true my wheels on the bike, using the fork blades or the stays as guides and a little screwdriver as feeler. A truing stand would be quicker, but I don't think it would be much more precise.

So if I were doing wheels for a living I would definitely get a truing stand, but since it's a hobby and since I usually don't have to redo the wheels I have done, my need for a truing stand is very limited.
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Old 02-10-08, 11:29 PM   #124
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
For further reading/thinking: most any acid will remove rust - because rust is (mostly) ferric oxide, Fe2O3, and reacts with (and is dissolved by) even such weak acids such as carbonic acid - present in sodas and Coke and such.

The most common acid used for rust removal is phosphoric acid.
Just be careful, though! Given time, any acid will react with steel, and will react even more quickly with aluminum. I'm not saying it won't work fine, but don't leave the parts laying in acid for too long.

Oh, and citric acid is better than phosphoric acid because it chelates metal ions. EDTA, (not disodium or tetrasodium EDTA,) would be better, but it's rather expensive and much more difficult to find.
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Old 02-12-08, 01:58 PM   #125
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27 x 1 1/4 innertube fits in a 26 x 1 3/8 E.A.3 tire
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