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  1. #151
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    A surgical forcep, applied to the free end of a brake cable, will hold it in position on the caliper until it can be tightened in place.

  2. #152
    You Know!? For Kids! jsharr's Avatar
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    When replacing the rim tape, use a wooden golf tee to hold the tape in place. Line the hole in the rim tape up with the valve stem hole in the rim. Insert a wooden golf into the valve stem hole and press it firmly in place. This will keep the tape alinged with valve stem hole and you pull the tape firm.

    After you are done, you can use the rounded end of the golf tee to rub the tape into place and make sure it not loose anywhere.
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorider View Post
    Phobias are for irrational fears. Fear of junk ripping badgers is perfectly rational. Those things are nasty.

  3. #153
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    Dudes, you're complicating things!
    Use your finger for the rimtape!
    Surgical forceps??! how mch are those?? and where does everybody get them?? WHAT?!
    this forum is to make things EASIER not harder! The latter is what you're suggesting!
    So please, simplify.

  4. #154
    You Know!? For Kids! jsharr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikefix View Post
    Dudes, you're complicating things!
    Use your finger for the rimtape!
    Surgical forceps??! how mch are those?? and where does everybody get them?? WHAT?!
    this forum is to make things EASIER not harder! The latter is what you're suggesting!
    So please, simplify.
    I did simplify for me. If I try to hold tape in place with a finger, I often get back to the valve stem hole and find the tape has slipped maybe an 1/8" or so. I do not like this. I have golf tees in the garage, right by my work bench, so it is easy to grab one, shove it in the hole to keep tape aligned and have both hands free to do a quality tape job.
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorider View Post
    Phobias are for irrational fears. Fear of junk ripping badgers is perfectly rational. Those things are nasty.

  5. #155
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    Dudes, you're complicating things!
    Use your finger for the rimtape!
    Surgical forceps??! how mch are those?? and where does everybody get them?? WHAT?!
    this forum is to make things EASIER not harder! The latter is what you're suggesting!
    So please, simplify.
    Forceps are the best way to get your brakes just...right.

    A 30-sec internet search turned up a good pair for $12.50...bet you could turn up a better deal if you did a little searching and/or lived near a uni. They're so much better than "third-hand" brake tools that I've never priced (or owned) those, but I'll bet they're competitive.

    The type needed resembles a locking pair of scissors with a "needle-nose-piers" gripper instead of twin blades. Basically, get the brakes (sidepulls is what comes to mind) to the exact place you want them, then squeeze the forceps onto the cable--it'll hold the desired setting as long as needed until you get the bolt tight. Same principle as a cable stop, but installs in 5% of the time.

    IIRC, third-hand tools lock the brakes against the rims, so you have an additional adjustment to make...plus, locked brakes give no clue as to centering! (Plus, I'd imagine it could be pressed into use on a derailleur, as opposed to a typical brake tool.)

    Obv. not a "must-have," but if you happen to be able to get a pair easy (maybe you're pre-med or somethin'), they're the best tool for the job.

  6. #156
    Peace and bicycle grease! une_vitesse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    You've spent the best part of an hour trying to set the brakepads of your V-brakes or Cantilevers, but no matter what you do, either the left or the right pad touches the rim while no pressure is applied to the brake lever. You are silently going crazy.

    Well, the rim might be out of true! If the only thing that fixes the problem is widening the brakepads, then that's a clear indication that this is indeed the case. Of course, if you widen the brakepads too much, you will have no braking power, so the only medicine is to true the wheel.
    or the wheel isn't properly seated in the dropouts!
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  7. #157
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    Video pls.!

    Yo, thnks for ur patience and not retaliating back! I was alil annoyed initially but, now i see some potential. BUT, please, send me/us a GOOD VIDEO of how to use these forceps pls.! This could save ppl time n trouble and/or merely be a refreshg new way to do things!

    Thnks!
    Send video to dextao@gmail.com

  8. #158
    Senior Member Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
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    The nice thing about a third hand tensioner is that it pulls the cable taught as it ratchets to hold it in place. I've never had one that was really good, but it still makes brake work much easier. Foreceps are great for the holding, but not the tensioning.

    On the other hand, I usually install with the brake pads right up against the rims. I find that one or two good squeezes on the lever backs them off enough without adjusting as long as the rims are true.
    Joshua A.C. Newman,
    Passionate lover of construction

  9. #159
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    * when you get a flat and have no pump, patches or new tubes. you can take your tire off and pack grass or leaves where your tube was then put your tire on and carefully ride to the nearest place to fix your tube. you have to be extra carefull to not damage your rim, but it will get you out of a jam.

  10. #160
    punk kid.
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    when installing pedals, hold the rear wheel with your hand to apply easy, maximum torque! (does not work for removal unless you have fixed gear)

    tire wont seat correctly on your old rims? spray some pledge or simple green along the bead!
    Last edited by rs1101; 12-04-08 at 12:40 AM.

  11. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by KasbeKZ View Post
    i was pretty proud today. i'm at college with no tools, and i needed to rebuild my wheel. so to get the tire off with no spoons, i used the little handle on the bike pump. the one that puts the pressure on the valve. it was pretty cool.
    Another college student sans-tools here, the clamp on my FD broke on the way to class, so I took a guitar pick off my keychain and completely removed the derailleur in less than a minute.

    Wasn't even late for class.

  12. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    Building/converting a singlespeed, but have vertical dropouts and no chain tensioner? Use an old rear derailer/derailleur, it'll work great! Not only does it have really good springs and pulleys (generally much better than separately buyable chain tensioners) and is MUCH cheaper than a separate chain tensioner, even if bought new, but a derailer has the most comfortable way of adjusting the chainline - just adjust the H limit screw!

    The only drawback is that a derailer is usually heavier than a chain tensioner, but you can always get rid or a few little parts on the derailer, to make it a bit lighter.
    Same idea, but you can also leave a piece of cable engaged in the derailleur and turn the barrel adjuster to get the desired chainline

  13. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnBrooking View Post
    I hope the following is an okay tip, because I'm still an amateur, and I only just picked it up from a 9-year-old! But it worked for me this morning.

    When installing the back wheel of a singlespeed, where the chain tension is adjusted only by the placement of the axle on the dropouts (such as a kids coaster-brake bike), you can use any blunt tool as a lever between the bottom bracket (as the fulcrum) and the wheel so that you can keep the wheel pushed out with one hand while you ratchet the axle nuts with the other.

    Another newbie (and I mean it) tip for working on kids' bikes that I just figured out myself last night: If you turn the bike upside down to work on it and the back wheel is resting on the floor so that you can't work with it, turn the bike back upright and raise the seat so that, when upside down, the seat rests on the floor instead, leaving the back wheel free to turn.
    Hello, my dear friend.

  14. #164
    punk kid.
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    anyone tried filing their axles to make a fixed gear with vertical dropouts?

    other tip for setting brakes. assuming you have something like a third hand to hold the calipers taught. tighten screw to hold cable just a little little bit. then squeeze brake handle to desired pull range when closed. then tighten. brakes set in 30 seconds.
    Last edited by rs1101; 12-16-08 at 03:19 AM.

  15. #165
    Dirt Bomb sknhgy's Avatar
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    Powdered mica is the best lube to use when mounting tires on rims.
    You can order it from bullet reloading supply houses like MidwayUSA.
    more cops have been killed by donuts than guns in chicago it is a medical fact ask any doctor.

  16. #166
    Senior Member cmcanulty's Avatar
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    Those plastic squeeze clamps work as a great third hand tool, use a fairly large one to clear wheel, fenders, etc. They ratchet so you can clamp the brakes shut or leave them where you want them to be when done.
    Last edited by cmcanulty; 12-17-08 at 05:25 PM.

  17. #167
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    Brass air fittings

    Now that is a lot of brass air fittings http://www.liangdianup.com/subpages/airfitting_1.htm there is just about every type
    of air fitting that you could want. Wholesale prices too. I guess these could be used as small water pipe fitting also. I
    used some of the parts to make my babington wvo bu

  18. #168
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    Forceps guy needs one of these...

    the fourth hand tool pulls and locks in one motion, but the locking feature is actually kind of annoying to me and i'm faster without the thing anyhow...

  19. #169
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcubed View Post
    Forceps are the best way to get your brakes just...right.

    A 30-sec internet search turned up a good pair for $12.50...bet you could turn up a better deal if you did a little searching and/or lived near a uni. They're so much better than "third-hand" brake tools that I've never priced (or owned) those, but I'll bet they're competitive.

    The type needed resembles a locking pair of scissors with a "needle-nose-piers" gripper instead of twin blades. Basically, get the brakes (sidepulls is what comes to mind) to the exact place you want them, then squeeze the forceps onto the cable--it'll hold the desired setting as long as needed until you get the bolt tight. Same principle as a cable stop, but installs in 5% of the time.

    IIRC, third-hand tools lock the brakes against the rims, so you have an additional adjustment to make...plus, locked brakes give no clue as to centering! (Plus, I'd imagine it could be pressed into use on a derailleur, as opposed to a typical brake tool.)

    Obv. not a "must-have," but if you happen to be able to get a pair easy (maybe you're pre-med or somethin'), they're the best tool for the job.
    I think you mean "hemostat," not forceps:


  20. #170
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    Lol, correct! Pops used to sell surgical equipment, can't believe i missed that.

  21. #171
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    To tighten the chain on the rear wheel of a fixed gear or BMX, loosen the axle nut on the non-gear side and grab the wheel near the bottom bracket and pull so the nut move toward the rear of the bike. With your other hand tighten the nut pretty snug. Then loosen the gear side, grab the wheel in the same place, and push the wheel toward the gear side. Tighten the gear-side axle nut pretty snug. At this point the chain will likely have proper tension, but the wheel alignment will be off, so loosen the non-gear side to adjust, then do a final tightening.

    Now before you do this, pedal a few revolutions with the bike upside down or in a stand and see if the chain is sometimes looser and then tighter. Then, to make up for possible out-of-round freewheels, axles, crank spindles, and chainrings, pedal until the chain seems to be at its tightest point, and then proceed to the tightening procedure above. Otherwise the "loose" pedaling phase will be tight and the "tight" phase will be overtight. Better a chain too loose than too tight.
    Last edited by Timbert; 01-28-09 at 02:06 PM.

  22. #172
    punk kid.
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    to fix an off center chainwheel pedal cranks to tightest position where the chain is very tight, then take 1 hammer and strike front of chainwheel. pretty hard if you like.

  23. #173
    Bicycle Student bokerfest's Avatar
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    If you ever find yourself in position without a pump with a presta end or an adapter find a department store pump and unscrew the valve at the end and insert the presta valve into the end of the hose. I have done this twice and it worked great. I was able to get my tire to the 80 psi of 85 it called for.


    The presta valve pits perfectly into the diameter of the hose. I have seen it used on two different pumps. Of course not all hoses will be the same size inside.


  24. #174
    Cfd
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    Magnetic Steel Tray

    Quote Originally Posted by halfspeed View Post
    It's a good idea to keep bearings and screws in a container, like an old ash tray, so they don't roll away.
    Always use one of those magnetic steel trays for holding (and catching) small parts & hardware.
    Everything - including bearings - sticks to them without fail.

    (Harbor Freight sells them cheap, $2-$5 - http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=37033)

  25. #175
    Free wheel Ganzen's Avatar
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    Cleaning out seat posts and fork stems

    Double a piece of heavy wire over and hammer the loop on the end closed so that the two wires lay parallel to each other. Cut the loose ends flush and chuck the ends into a drill. Take a small bit of cloth and string it between the wires at the end where the bend is. Soak the rag in WD 40 or some other degreaser and place the rag into the tube. Use the drill to spin the rag and clean out the old grease and rust.

    You can also chuck up a strip of emery cloth or sandpaper in the wire mandrel to clean out badly rusted tubes (just be sure the dust isn't dumping down the tube into a closed BB and contaminating the bearings).

    Ganzen
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