Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-07-07, 12:19 AM   #1
C_LOGAN
Hammer Time
Thread Starter
 
C_LOGAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Australia
Bikes: Paconi, Hillman, Sun Tourer + Mongoose Tetra SX
Posts: 258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Removing old Maeda (Suntour) freewheel

I have a bike which requires a new spoke - next to the freewheel. I can replace the spoke without taking the freewheel off by using my own patented method of bending the spoke until it goes through, and then bending it back into shape..

As you can imagine, this is a very bad method..... Is there any way to remove a Maeda freewheel without using a tool? I have a Shimano freewheel remover, but not an old Suntour one. I don't want to purchase a tool as I am selling the bike - and don't usually deal with these sorts of very old parts.
C_LOGAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 01:04 AM   #2
DannoXYZ 
Senior Member
 
DannoXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Saratoga, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 11,606
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Bring it to a shop, although they'll probably charge you more to remove it than the $6 it would cost you to buy the tool...
DannoXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 01:27 AM   #3
C_LOGAN
Hammer Time
Thread Starter
 
C_LOGAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Australia
Bikes: Paconi, Hillman, Sun Tourer + Mongoose Tetra SX
Posts: 258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DannoXYZ
Bring it to a shop, although they'll probably charge you more to remove it than the $6 it would cost you to buy the tool...
I have the option of going to a shop - they will most likely do it for nothing as all it takes is a twist and a bit of elbow grease.. I just can't be bothered carrying a wheel. Just wondering if there is a simple tool method.
C_LOGAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 06:12 AM   #4
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
Posts: 29,117
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 179 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by C_LOGAN
I have the option of going to a shop - they will most likely do it for nothing as all it takes is a twist and a bit of elbow grease.. I just can't be bothered carrying a wheel. Just wondering if there is a simple tool method.
The proper tool is the only way to remove the freewheel without destroying it. These things are torqued on super tight from pedaling forces and a simple hammer-and-punch approach won't work. A Sun Tour 2 or 4-prong (depending on the model) remover is a cheap tool and a lot less expensive than having to replace the freewheel.
HillRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 06:18 AM   #5
Noam Zane
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
I just can't be bothered carrying a wheel. Just wondering if there is a simple tool method.
Bash the thing to bits with a BFH. Or you could make a trip to the LBS for the correct "simple tool".
Noam Zane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 06:21 AM   #6
C_LOGAN
Hammer Time
Thread Starter
 
C_LOGAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Australia
Bikes: Paconi, Hillman, Sun Tourer + Mongoose Tetra SX
Posts: 258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Maybe I can put the freewheel and cranks on the LHS of the bike - and pedal really hard. It may just pop off...

Thanks for the input.. I suspected there may not be a way to do this without the tool - I just wanted to check before I went out to buy a tool that I will most likely never use again. I may just go to the LBS and request that they remove it for me.
C_LOGAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 07:48 AM   #7
tellyho
Your mom
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 2,541
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You need the tool. And it may still be a b*tch with the proper tool.
tellyho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 07:58 AM   #8
C_LOGAN
Hammer Time
Thread Starter
 
C_LOGAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Australia
Bikes: Paconi, Hillman, Sun Tourer + Mongoose Tetra SX
Posts: 258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tellyho
You need the tool. And it may still be a b*tch with the proper tool.
Not with my 12'' wrench and the stomp of death.
C_LOGAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 08:01 AM   #9
tellyho
Your mom
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 2,541
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just make sure the death stomp doesn't wind up the stomp of nutsack death as well.
tellyho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 08:06 AM   #10
C_LOGAN
Hammer Time
Thread Starter
 
C_LOGAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Australia
Bikes: Paconi, Hillman, Sun Tourer + Mongoose Tetra SX
Posts: 258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tellyho
Just make sure the death stomp doesn't wind up the stomp of nutsack death as well.
I am not worried about nutsack death on a 27 inch wheel. Maybe if I was doing the same thing on the front wheel of a penny farthing I would be a bit concerned.
C_LOGAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 08:39 AM   #11
top506
Death fork? Naaaah!!
 
top506's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: The other Maine, north of RT 2
Bikes: '71 Gitane Super Corsa, '73 Atala Giro d'Italia, '73 Schwinn Super Sport, '76 Viscount Aerospace Pro, '81 Miyata 710, '81 Lotus Classique, '84 Ross Signature 290s, '85 Miele Gara, '87 Miyata 512, '89 Centurion Ironman, many more
Posts: 3,807
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Plan 'B':
Unscrew the front ring of the freewheel (it's reverse threaded) with a punch and hammer. Flip the wheel over a coffee can to catch the approx 100 small ball bearings that will fall out. Remove the cogset, and the pawls and springs from the freewheel body. Clamp the freewheel body in a vise across the flats machined for the pawls and springs. A large pipe wrench will work as well. Unscrew the wheel from the freewheel body. If needed, touch up any burs on the freewheel body caused by clamping with a file. Then re-assemble the freewheel.
While I've been forced to do this now and again, plan 'A' (buy the tool or go to the LBS) is far more attractive.
Top
__________________
You know it's going to be a good day when the stem and seatpost come right out.
top506 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 09:30 AM   #12
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
Posts: 29,117
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 179 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by top506
Plan 'B':
Unscrew the front ring of the freewheel (it's reverse threaded) with a punch and hammer. Flip the wheel over a coffee can to catch the approx 100 small ball bearings that will fall out. Remove the cogset, and the pawls and springs from the freewheel body. Clamp the freewheel body in a vise across the flats machined for the pawls and springs. A large pipe wrench will work as well. Unscrew the wheel from the freewheel body. If needed, touch up any burs on the freewheel body caused by clamping with a file. Then re-assemble the freewheel.
While I've been forced to do this now and again, plan 'A' (buy the tool or go to the LBS) is far more attractive.
Top
I know this works but the usual final instruction of Plan B is: "discard all the damaged pieces and fit a new freewheel." Given the force needed to remove a well-tightened freewheel, I'm surprised the body ever survives the wrench application in usable form.
HillRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 02:46 PM   #13
top506
Death fork? Naaaah!!
 
top506's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: The other Maine, north of RT 2
Bikes: '71 Gitane Super Corsa, '73 Atala Giro d'Italia, '73 Schwinn Super Sport, '76 Viscount Aerospace Pro, '81 Miyata 710, '81 Lotus Classique, '84 Ross Signature 290s, '85 Miele Gara, '87 Miyata 512, '89 Centurion Ironman, many more
Posts: 3,807
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider
I know this works but the usual final instruction of Plan B is: "discard all the damaged pieces and fit a new freewheel." Given the force needed to remove a well-tightened freewheel, I'm surprised the body ever survives the wrench application in usable form.
Of the half a dozen or so Atom, Normandy, and old Shimano freewheels I've removed this way I only buggered one of them up beyond repair. Most didn't even require touch-up filing. Those feewheel bodies are tough!
However, I do not recommend this execpt as an absolute last resort.
Top
__________________
You know it's going to be a good day when the stem and seatpost come right out.
top506 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 03:56 PM   #14
cudak888 
www.theheadbadge.com
 
cudak888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Southern Florida
Bikes: http://www.theheadbadge.com
Posts: 22,746
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Get your behind in gear and take that wheel to the LBS. Far less effort then wrecking the damn thing with a hammer and punch. Either that, or buy the correct two-prong remover tool - if nothing else, you will find reason to use it again, and it'll work on the 4-prong variants as well. $6-7 isn't going to kill you.

-Kurt
__________________
cudak888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 09:20 PM   #15
C_LOGAN
Hammer Time
Thread Starter
 
C_LOGAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Australia
Bikes: Paconi, Hillman, Sun Tourer + Mongoose Tetra SX
Posts: 258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by top506
Plan 'B':
Unscrew the front ring of the freewheel (it's reverse threaded) with a punch and hammer. Flip the wheel over a coffee can to catch the approx 100 small ball bearings that will fall out. Remove the cogset, and the pawls and springs from the freewheel body. Clamp the freewheel body in a vise across the flats machined for the pawls and springs. A large pipe wrench will work as well. Unscrew the wheel from the freewheel body. If needed, touch up any burs on the freewheel body caused by clamping with a file. Then re-assemble the freewheel.
While I've been forced to do this now and again, plan 'A' (buy the tool or go to the LBS) is far more attractive.
Top
I don't have a vise or a punch.... My tool set consists of variety of spanners, wrenches, screw drivers, hammers, crank tool, bb cartridge tool, shimano freehwheel removal tool, chain tool, pen, magnet attached to a string incase I loose any parts under the verandah.
C_LOGAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 10:43 PM   #16
Noam Zane
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
In the 21 plus hours between your first and last post you might have been able to squeeze a trip or six to the bike shop into your tight schedule. Throw that fuggan wheel into the nearest lake.
Noam Zane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-07, 10:55 PM   #17
C_LOGAN
Hammer Time
Thread Starter
 
C_LOGAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Australia
Bikes: Paconi, Hillman, Sun Tourer + Mongoose Tetra SX
Posts: 258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noam Zane
In the 21 plus hours between your first and last post you might have been able to squeeze a trip or six to the bike shop into your tight schedule. Throw that fuggan wheel into the nearest lake.
I live in Australia - the time is all messed up here. You might think I have the time - but most of the 21 hours has been night. And I don't feel like going outside at the moment - it has been raining and I don't want to get the soles of my shoes wet.
C_LOGAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-07, 11:25 AM   #18
cudak888 
www.theheadbadge.com
 
cudak888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Southern Florida
Bikes: http://www.theheadbadge.com
Posts: 22,746
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by C_LOGAN
I live in Australia - the time is all messed up here. You might think I have the time - but most of the 21 hours has been night. And I don't feel like going outside at the moment - it has been raining and I don't want to get the soles of my shoes wet.
Is that to say that the shops are open for no more then 3 hours?

Put boots on.

Excuses, excuses...

-Kurt
__________________
cudak888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-07, 11:36 AM   #19
operator
cab horn
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1987 Bianchi Campione
Posts: 28,306
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Why is this still being discussed.

1) Freewheel tool: $5
2) Put wheel in bench vise, turn - job complete.
-or-
3) take it to your LBS.

Thread over.
operator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-07, 05:07 PM   #20
Seggybop
o.O
 
Seggybop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 576
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A screwdriver and a hammer will work, you don`t really need a vise and punch.
Seggybop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-07, 09:00 PM   #21
C_LOGAN
Hammer Time
Thread Starter
 
C_LOGAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Australia
Bikes: Paconi, Hillman, Sun Tourer + Mongoose Tetra SX
Posts: 258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
OK. I will put this thread to bed. I am going to the bike shop to buy some spokes, and whilst there will request that they loosen the freewheel for me.

Thanks for the input and motivation to leave the house.

Urgent update: It is now a few hours after the initial posting of this message - I took it to the bike shop and they loosened it for me - I bought a few spokes, bought a star nut and a set of metal tyre levers. I had the star nut installed and freewheel loosened for free. All up $14.00 which is about how much a tool would have cost.

Urgent update: Spokes have been replaced and bike reassembled.

Last edited by C_LOGAN; 07-09-07 at 02:13 AM.
C_LOGAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-07, 09:24 AM   #22
AndrewP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Montreal
Bikes: Peugeot Hybrid, Minelli Hybrid
Posts: 6,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Many LBSs do not have old freewheel removal tools for sale. Let the shop do it.
AndrewP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-07, 11:56 AM   #23
davidrhorn
Dave the tourer
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Maryland
Bikes: Iron Horse Hollowpoint Mark III Expert, Trek VRX 300, Trek 520
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
holy crap. did I just spend 10 minutes of my life reading this thread? (and another minute typing a reply?)
davidrhorn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-11, 11:54 PM   #24
laman012
Vive la vélorution!
 
laman012's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Straight Outta Davis, CA
Bikes: Puch Marco Polo
Posts: 158
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidrhorn View Post
holy crap. did I just spend 10 minutes of my life reading this thread? (and another minute typing a reply?)
holy crap. did i just read this all four years later and then bring the thread back to life?
laman012 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-12, 04:52 PM   #25
celephais
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I had the same problem, googled it, found this thread - here's what I did. Oh and it might not be a Maeda, perhaps a 'perfect', sounds like a similar construction though.

anyway

1. remove the axle
2. I used a 12mm crescent wrench and stuck the open end into the centre of the freewheel - the ends of the wrench were the right width and had the right spread that they grabbed the two slots. Then I used an adjustable wrench to grab the cheeks of the 12mm wrench as close to the freewheel as I could. I kept one hand on the wrench to steady it and the other to torque the adjustable - worked like a charm. Maybe less chance of damage than the punch and hammer method? (but if it works it works).

good luck - I now need to disassemble the thing....
celephais is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:02 AM.