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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 07-17-03, 07:40 AM   #1
roger trout
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Mounting a New Tire

Please forgive my ignorance on the following subject, but I am just getting started into a cycling life.

I tried to mount some new tires on a road bike rim last night and had all kinds of problems. I got the tire sized at a shop, and they assured me it was correct.

My question is, do you have to really stretch new tires when installing, I have changed hundreds of flats, but never a new installation.

I would really appreciate your patience and your help in solving my dilemma without having to have the shop do it.

Thanks,
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Old 07-17-03, 08:51 AM   #2
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Are the new tires the same size as the old tires?
Does the tire have a wire or kevlar bead?
Were you using tire levers or your bare hands?
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Old 07-17-03, 10:07 AM   #3
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It's not unusual. Rims vary in height. Tires vary in bead circumference. Tight tires are easy enough to get on with tools, but they're a nuisance, mainly because it's easy to pinch (and puncture) the tube installing them.
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Old 07-17-03, 05:10 PM   #4
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If you'd like some advice for fitting a new t(y)(i)re there's some great advice at:

http://www.bicyclinglife.com/HowTo/FixAFlat.htm

It covers a lot of stuff about fixing flats but goes through the basics of putting a tyre on. Depending on the tyre it could be quite tough.

However as long as you have one side of the tyre in first, partially inflate the tube to make sure it has it's shape, shove it in right around the rim, then starting about a 1/3 the way around from the valve squeeze with your fingers the tyre in on the opposite side bit by bit. It should be relatively easy until you have the last few inches left. Then you might need a bit of delicate brute force or maybe the very careful application of a tyre lever.

Before fully inflating go around the whole tyre squeezing the sides in making sure you didn't pinch the tube between the rim and the tyre... Then you're ready to go!

You could also get the bike shop the fit it while you watch and hopefully learn a thing or two.

It might turn out they sold you the wrong product
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Old 07-18-03, 05:32 AM   #5
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Thanks for the help, I am glad to say that I did get the tire on last evening. (I only have a few bruises and cuts)

The website that you recommended AdrianB is very informative, again thanks to you all for your attention to my problem.
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Old 07-18-03, 09:07 AM   #6
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You do have to be quite careful if your bead is very tight.

I have changed my MTB several times back and forth between wide knobbies and narrower street slicks and can now do it in a few minutes with no problem.

My wife, however, has a new touring bike, and we trashed both of her tires the other night. When trying to put the original tires, sold with the bike, back on, the bead was unbelievably far from the edge of the rim when you got down to the last six inches. No way it would ever go on without levers. Took tremendous force with the levers to get it on.

Next morning both her tires were flat. We discovered we had broken the wire bead on both and punctured the tubes.

Are high pressure tires normally this hard to get on? I would say that at the last six inches left off the rim, the bead was at least still an inch (maybe more) from the edge of the rim. Remember, these were the tires sold stock with the rims, so I don't think they were mis-sized.

mark
t
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Old 07-18-03, 07:41 PM   #7
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Place the wheel/tire on the ground with the valve at the top.
Put the bead of the tire on the side away from you on the rim.
Put the tube in place.
Put as much of the bead facing you on the rim, usually the last 3-4".
With the wheel/tire still on the ground and the valve at the top.
Start on the bottom of the left side and push the tire bead into the smallest part (center) of the rim while forcing the tire up towards the valve. When you reach the valve, hold the tire in place on that side and repeat the process on the other side.
At this point, with some pressure roll the side of the bead facing you onto and over the rim. If you have to, push the valve stem up into the tire
You can do just about the opposite to remove the tire. Only you'll roll the bead facing you off the rim first.
Since breaking 3 tire irons and pinch flating a tube one time while changing a pair of Conti slicks on my mountainbike I have been doing and demonstrating this to everyone/anyone I come in contact with.
I have yet to have to use a tire iron on any tire, wire or kevlar bead, that is correctly sized.
The key is to keep the bead in the center of the rim where it is the smallest diameter, not on the edge where it eventually sits when properly inflated and seated.

Last edited by Trouble; 07-18-03 at 08:08 PM.
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