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  1. #1
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    difficult pedal removal

    I am trying to get some pedals off without killing myself. I have a small MKS pedal wrench which was just not doing the job. I don't have a proper pedal wrench so I tried to use my torque wrench with the 6mm allen bit, connecting it to the pedal on the back of the crank where the allen connection is, rather then in front of the crank where the pedal wrench hooks onto the pedal. I got it up to about 120 in. lbs but then the bit slipped out and my hand bashed into the chainring. Ouch. Anyhow I am starting to get the feeling that a torque wrench won't do in this situation either. If the pedals are on there that tightly should I just get it taken off at my LBS, or will a good pedal wrench be able to succeed where the torque wrench failed? Thanks for any help

    Oh yeah I am definitely going in the right direction, I know that L/R pedals are differently threaded.
    I have a lot of bike issues

  2. #2
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    120in/lbs in only 10ft/lbs, which isn't that much torque, really.

    A pedal wrench is just a narrow 15mm wrench. Get the longest one you can find and try that.

  3. #3
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    If you put the chain on the outer ring, it will hurt less when you slip and bash your hand against it. ;-)

    If possible, I like to set the wrench so the handle forms about a 15-degree angle with the crank. Then I put both hands around the wrench and crank and squeeze them together. You can get a lot of torque this way, and you won't hurt yourself if the wrench slips.

    Some pedals only have one position for the wrench though, in which case you're out of luck.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by elbows View Post
    If you put the chain on the outer ring, it will hurt less when you slip and bash your hand against it. ;-)
    That is EXACTLY the kind of common sense precaution I NEVER think to do
    thanks for the tip.
    I have a lot of bike issues

  5. #5
    Custom User Title kenleekenlee's Avatar
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    Spray some WD-40 and let it sit for a while. On the side of the bike you want the pedal off, move the crank arm to the 6 o'clock position and put your wrench on at the appropriate angle. If you're turning the wrench clockwise, the wrench should point to the 3 o'clock position. Counter-clockwise, 9 o'clock. Tap the wrench in the correct direction with a hammer. Next time use some grease.

    Good luck!

  6. #6
    Senior Member mike's Avatar
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    The best advice I ever had about pedal removal came from Sheldon Brown. Put the crank arm in a vice. Heat up the crank area around the pedal bolt, THEN torque on that wrench like the Hulk.

    I managed to get an absolutely stuck pedal free by doing this when nothing else worked - including ruining some wrenches along the way.
    Mike

  7. #7
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noahjz View Post
    If the pedals are on there that tightly should I just get it taken off at my LBS, or will a good pedal wrench be able to succeed where the torque wrench failed? Thanks for any help
    .
    A good quality pedal wrench with long handle (think Park Tools) will do the trick. Getting a good solid grip on the wrench flats on the pedal spindle is what you need. Plus, positioning the pedal and wrench to maximize leverage is a must. Soaking the fastener with a penetrating oil helps too. Also as a rule, I'll wear leather work gloves when I'm exerting a lot of effort to protect the hands if something were to slip.


    Using that 6mm hex head socket in the back of the pedal never worked for me. For one thing, I'm afraid the edges/corners will round out. Plus, the hex bit socket is probably two inches long, and when you torque on that fastener, you are also putting the socket into bending - ie not all of your effort is going into turning the pedal end. The 6mm hex head socket might be okay for installing a pedal.


    Finally, when you put the pedal back on, place some grease on the threads and the pedals need not be put on with gorilla strength. Also, you might want to take the pedal off every six months or so, just so that joint doesn't freeze up.

  8. #8
    Senior Member mike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MudPie View Post
    Finally, when you put the pedal back on, place some grease on the threads and the pedals need not be put on with gorilla strength. .
    Absolutely good advice.
    Mike

  9. #9
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    You are turning it the correct way? Sorry if this sounds stupidly obvious but I knew of at least one person somehow got it reversed. The right pedal is a normal thread and the left is left hand.
    “A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.” Robert A. Heinlein

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