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Old 09-12-01, 10:37 AM   #1
sorebutt
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Fitting a bike

I am a newbie.. I have a new Giant OCR 1 bike, and I need some help setting the bike's seat, handlle bar etc.. Is there a good refference material I could read about the subject (on-line is better)..

Thanks,

A

a pic of my bike
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Old 09-12-01, 10:47 AM   #2
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http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm
has a good section on fitting.
Many fitting guides ignore the factor of crank length, and many assume that you will be riding is a low, aerodynamic riding position, but many riders prefer a more upright position, even on a road bike.
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Old 09-12-01, 03:47 PM   #3
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NO.

Do not read anything. You will read 10 sources and get 10 differnt answers. Too many are simply not knowledgeable enough to say nothing.

YOU ARE THE EXPERT.

Only you can determine where you want to set your seat, bars, etc... for YOUR comfort.

There are guidelines. These as mentioned are simply guidelines. Use them as such. In the end you are the one that determines where it is more comfortable for you where the bars, seat, etc... sit.

Simply take some tools with you on rides early on so you can make changes on the road until YOU are comfortable.

There are too many out there that just got into the sport a few months ago and think of themselves as expert and passing down rumors and worse. Especially online.
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Old 09-12-01, 06:44 PM   #4
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Although Xavier is absolutely right about the final adjustments, you may wish to follow some basic, time-honored guidelines to establish a starting point. Examples of first-approximation settings you can try are:
1) saddle height: With your HEELS on the pedals and someone holding up the bike, spin the cranks backward. You want a full or near-full knee extension, without rocking the pelvis. When your feet are in the proper position, you will have a slight bend in the knee at the bottom of the stroke.
2) saddle-to-handlebar distance: One cubit, i.e., with your elbow pressed against the nose of the saddle, your middle finger should just about touch the back of the handlebar.
3) handlebar height: Varies more than any other setting from rider to rider. For general-purpose riding on drops, I like to have my back at about 45 degrees when my hands are atop the brake hoods.
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Old 09-13-01, 03:15 AM   #5
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Find LeMond's book or Hinault's they will get you very close. I've found the advice in these books to be quite useful. ( I've been riding 30 years and have had national caliber coaching) Even though the subject is road riding the saddle height and fore aft positioning works. As for the handle bar adjustment mentioned above there is no "set " way to do it, your flexibility is a big factor, just be comfortable and try to "stretch out" a bit.
Ride Well Adjusted
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Old 09-13-01, 07:56 AM   #6
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If you want a quick easy to use reference, check out the fitting quide at the colorado cyclists webpage I think it's www.coloradocyclist.com. You'll have to measure your inseam, which is hard to do by yourself, get you significant other to give you a hand.

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Old 09-14-01, 09:15 AM   #7
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Good news... My friend (who's is a pioneer of the sport and a US champion, and was a pro at his days) will come by next wednesday and will help me with the fitting... I'll keep you posted.

Thanks for you help,

A

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Old 09-14-01, 02:45 PM   #8
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A good mentor is invaluable. About 15 years ago, I learned alot when John Howard gave a 30-minute lecture/demo on proper road bike sizing and fitting.
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Old 09-19-01, 10:32 PM   #9
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so, my friend came by today (some old timers will know him, George Mount) and help me fit the bike.. took half an hour, some riding around the parking lot, and a bunch of adjustments. Apparently my seat was too low, too far forward, and my handle bar was too high.
The height of the seat he did by eye, he changed it, made me ride around, and etc... The forward seat position he used a plum line from behind my knee cap, to the pedal;..
I rode the bike home, and man, it was so much easier to ride...
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Old 12-05-01, 11:55 PM   #10
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Wow Sorebutt. What a difference a few adjustments can make huh. Glad that worked out for you.
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