Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 44
  1. #1
    Nighttime Rider
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    My Bikes
    Surly Pugsley, Schwinn Mesa LTD
    Posts
    508
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Where did you learn how to lace a wheel?

    I'll build and fix about anything on my bikes except lacing a new wheel.
    Yes, I've laced a wheel set once it and went off road with it and didn't die.
    But I'm pretty sure that it was not a quality job. I'd like to become more
    proficient at the art(?) or lacing but I'm not really sure how to go about it.

    Suggestions?

    CE

  2. #2
    Rat Bastard mcoomer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sammamish, WA
    My Bikes
    Cannondale Prophet, Specialized S-Works SL2, Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper
    Posts
    1,500
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sheldon of course!
    It's better to burn out than fade away...or slip out of your pedal and face plant on the side of the road!!!

    '06 Cannondale Prophet
    '08 Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper
    '09 Specialized S-Works Tarmac SL2

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,596
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Jobst Brandt's "The Bicycle Wheel" will provide practical lacing instructions but will also tell you WAY more than you really want to know about the theory.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kentwood michigan.
    My Bikes
    too many
    Posts
    484
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    on my back porch when I was 11. had a bent rim with a good hub, and a good rim with a bad hub, so I put them together and came up with a good rim.
    Since then I've done motorcycle and car rims on a semi regular basis.

    ken.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Stratford, New Zealand
    My Bikes
    2004 Mongoose Crossway 450, 198x Mitchells 7 Speed, 1990 Paul Dye Hand Built 7 Speed, 1965 Raleigh Sport
    Posts
    185
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I took my front apart, after marking on the hub and rim numerically from the valve stem. Then put it back together. You've got the other wheel to copy, assuming they're laced the same.

  6. #6
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    DC / Maryland suburbs
    My Bikes
    Homebuilt tourer/commuter, modified-beyond-recognition 1990 Trek 1100, reasonably stock 2002-ish Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo
    Posts
    4,172
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse View Post
    I'll build and fix about anything on my bikes except lacing a new wheel.
    Yes, I've laced a wheel set once it and went off road with it and didn't die.
    But I'm pretty sure that it was not a quality job. I'd like to become more
    proficient at the art(?) or lacing but I'm not really sure how to go about it.

    Suggestions?

    CE
    On a cold winter's night, in Beltsville, MD, in the basement with an old rim, a new fixed-gear hub and spokes, and my old laptop open to Sheldon Brown's wheelbuilding guide

    By the end of lacing and truing, there were lithium-greasy fingerprints all over the laptop
    My bikes | Linux and Python stuff | Photo gallery

    Sheldon Brown, I miss you. Thanks for the advice, ideas, humor, and infectious enthusiasm for everything bikes...

  7. #7
    Making a kilometer blurry waterrockets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Austin (near TX)
    My Bikes
    rkwaki's porn collection
    Posts
    26,081
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I rebuilt my first rear using my front as a guide. I managed to get the stem between the right spokes, but missed the hub label through the valve hole. I had just enough income to afford the parts, and this was back before I knew of "The Bicycle Wheel." Since then, I've used Sheldon's lacing method a lot, and Jobst's some too.

  8. #8
    Extra Medium Member redtires's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Louisville, Co
    My Bikes
    Fuji Roubaix 1.0 (Sampson Kalispell Ti GONE); VooDoo Wanga (Specialized Stumpy: GONE)
    Posts
    1,604
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Jobst Brandt's "The Bicycle Wheel" will provide practical lacing instructions but will also tell you WAY more than you really want to know about the theory.
    +infinity on this book. It's required reading for anyone wanting to learn to build wheels. I read it when I was about 17, and have built literally hundreds of wheels over the last 19 years. But for sure, practice makes perfect...and, uh....never stop practicing!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Deanster04's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Boulder, Colorado
    My Bikes
    Cinelli Supercoursa 69, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Mondonico Diamond Extra 05, Coors Light Greg Lemond (built by Scapin) 88, Scapin MTB, Stumpjumper 83, Specialized Stumpjumper M4, Lemond Poprad 2001
    Posts
    1,366
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Learned from an old master Spence Wolf. Another good book is Gerd Schraner's book The Art of Wheelbuilding. There are many ways to orient the spokes and you need first to understand that you need to understand something about the physics (don't let that word scare you) of the wheel and what is a pulling spoke, how the different braking methods affect the wheel. Sheldon is a fantastic start.

  10. #10
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    DC / Maryland suburbs
    My Bikes
    Homebuilt tourer/commuter, modified-beyond-recognition 1990 Trek 1100, reasonably stock 2002-ish Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo
    Posts
    4,172
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by kendall View Post
    on my back porch when I was 11. had a bent rim with a good hub, and a good rim with a bad hub, so I put them together and came up with a good rim.


    I just did something similar with computers today... I found three partially stripped ones and made a Franken-computer. One had a decent motherboard and 1ghz processor, another had 384 megs of RAM and network and video cards, and the third had CD-ROM and floppy drives. I added a power supply from another busted computer, and a couple cables, and voilà, I had a working Linux box. So I guess four different computers actually got combined into this one. Yikes.

    Reminds me of the way I built my girlfriend's bike, starting with a nice Nishiki Sport I picked up off craigslist, and combining other used but good parts.
    My bikes | Linux and Python stuff | Photo gallery

    Sheldon Brown, I miss you. Thanks for the advice, ideas, humor, and infectious enthusiasm for everything bikes...

  11. #11
    Body By Nintendo Psydotek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Videogames ruined my life. Good thing i have 2 extra lives.
    My Bikes
    Giant TCR2, Giant TCX, IRO BFSSFG SE, Salsa Casseroll, IRO Rob Roy.
    Posts
    3,190
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Lacing a wheel is easy. Getting it trued and tensioned, that's not so easy...

    Quote Originally Posted by jsharr View Post
    A girl once asked me to give her twelve inches and make it hurt. I had to make love to her 3 times and then punch her in the nose.

  12. #12
    In beaurocratic limbo urbanknight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Allez, K2 Razorback
    Posts
    22,457
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I learned from an older racer (1976 Olympic Team member) who showed me by building one wheel with me, then watching me do the second one.
    "Well, I guess you can cut the arts as much as you want... Sooner or later, these kids aren't going to have anything to read or write about." (Richard Dreyfus as Glenn Holland)

  13. #13
    Senior Member smurf hunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Auburn, WA
    My Bikes
    2006 LeMond Croix de Fer, 2005 Kona Dew Deluxe
    Posts
    624
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by moxfyre View Post


    I just did something similar with computers today... I found three partially stripped ones and made a Franken-computer. One had a decent motherboard and 1ghz processor, another had 384 megs of RAM and network and video cards, and the third had CD-ROM and floppy drives. I added a power supply from another busted computer, and a couple cables, and voilà, I had a working Linux box. So I guess four different computers actually got combined into this one. Yikes.

    Reminds me of the way I built my girlfriend's bike, starting with a nice Nishiki Sport I picked up off craigslist, and combining other used but good parts.
    Running linux on franken-hardware is usually the best bang for your buck. I follow a similar thought process for wheels - I get older premium hubs like Dura-ace, clean and service as needed and that saves a couple hundred $$$ per wheelset. Obviously I've got to hunt around for parts, but it almost makes the whole process mean more.

  14. #14
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by smurf hunter View Post
    Running linux on franken-hardware is usually the best bang for your buck.
    True for the home user only. Or small setups.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  15. #15
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    DC / Maryland suburbs
    My Bikes
    Homebuilt tourer/commuter, modified-beyond-recognition 1990 Trek 1100, reasonably stock 2002-ish Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo
    Posts
    4,172
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by smurf hunter View Post
    Running linux on franken-hardware is usually the best bang for your buck. I follow a similar thought process for wheels - I get older premium hubs like Dura-ace, clean and service as needed and that saves a couple hundred $$$ per wheelset. Obviously I've got to hunt around for parts, but it almost makes the whole process mean more.
    True for the home user only. Or small setups.
    I think he meant, "Running Linux on franken-hardware is the best bang for your buck, compared to running Windows on that same hardware"... not "The best way to run Linux is on something you've pulled out of the dumpster." At least, that's how I understood it!

    Obviously, maintaining a bunch of heterogeneous and out-of-date hardware would be a nightmare in most large business environments. Though I do know someone who built a Beowulf cluster of 10-20 nodes almost entirely from dumpster-diving... No word on how reliable or power-efficient it was, though

    Anyway, I'm way off topic. Sorry
    My bikes | Linux and Python stuff | Photo gallery

    Sheldon Brown, I miss you. Thanks for the advice, ideas, humor, and infectious enthusiasm for everything bikes...

  16. #16
    hello roadfix's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Los Angeles
    My Bikes
    thank you for asking
    Posts
    18,502
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That white, hard-covered wheel-building book.

  17. #17
    Making a kilometer blurry waterrockets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Austin (near TX)
    My Bikes
    rkwaki's porn collection
    Posts
    26,081
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by moxfyre View Post
    I think he meant, "Running Linux on franken-hardware is the best bang for your buck, compared to running Windows on that same hardware"... not "The best way to run Linux is on something you've pulled out of the dumpster." At least, that's how I understood it!

    Obviously, maintaining a bunch of heterogeneous and out-of-date hardware would be a nightmare in most large business environments. Though I do know someone who built a Beowulf cluster of 10-20 nodes almost entirely from dumpster-diving... No word on how reliable or power-efficient it was, though

    Anyway, I'm way off topic. Sorry
    Do you lace a Beowulf cluster leading or trailing first?

  18. #18
    ǝıd ǝʌol ʎllɐǝɹ I JeanCoutu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    518
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    About 15ish years ago I read a book from the 70's called "fix your bicycle". In it was a crude section on wheelbuilding, the info you can get on the net for free is a lot better. I first used the knowledge in that book on my own bike, then on parts found in the trash. Built franken bikes and mostly ran them to the ground, or gave them to my buddies. My first wheels didn't last very long, but by now I don't want other people to build wheels for me.

  19. #19
    Senior Member smurf hunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Auburn, WA
    My Bikes
    2006 LeMond Croix de Fer, 2005 Kona Dew Deluxe
    Posts
    624
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by moxfyre View Post
    I think he meant, "Running Linux on franken-hardware is the best bang for your buck, compared to running Windows on that same hardware"... not "The best way to run Linux is on something you've pulled out of the dumpster." At least, that's how I understood it!

    Obviously, maintaining a bunch of heterogeneous and out-of-date hardware would be a nightmare in most large business environments. Though I do know someone who built a Beowulf cluster of 10-20 nodes almost entirely from dumpster-diving... No word on how reliable or power-efficient it was, though

    Anyway, I'm way off topic. Sorry
    I was way off topic and that is what I meant.

  20. #20
    Member AKTed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Alaska
    My Bikes
    Airborne Lucky Strike, Gunnar Sport, Surly LHT
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I personally found the Gerd Schraner book the most helpful when I built my first wheels. I used Sheldon's info in conjunction with Gerd's book, and throughly enjoyed the satisfaction of building a set of wheels! But it is sort of addictive. I'm constantly looking for some excuse to build up another wheelset.

  21. #21
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    DC / Maryland suburbs
    My Bikes
    Homebuilt tourer/commuter, modified-beyond-recognition 1990 Trek 1100, reasonably stock 2002-ish Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo
    Posts
    4,172
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by smurf hunter View Post
    I was way off topic and that is what I meant.
    Hehehe. I'm starting to think we need a forum for "bike-related threads that may devolve into computer geek fests." It's fun to talk about JUST bikes or JUST computers... but even better to make random jumps among them
    My bikes | Linux and Python stuff | Photo gallery

    Sheldon Brown, I miss you. Thanks for the advice, ideas, humor, and infectious enthusiasm for everything bikes...

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    60
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am just now finishing up a clinic my local REI is putting on. We did a night of "theory" and selecting the components we wanted to build a wheel out of. Then, we did a day to go over more theory and to actually build the front wheel. The final day is the rear wheel.

    I don't know about the rest of you, but I find it easier to learn with help than to read a book and do it myself. I don't know if other REIs or LBSs do similar clinics, but it was the way to go for me.

    However, now that I have the hunger to build wheels, I'm going to have to figure out how to satisfy it without buying $400 worth of truing stands, spoke wrenches, tensionometers, etc...
    2002 Lemond Tourmalet
    2006 Marin Kentfield
    2007 Windsor "The Hour"

  23. #23
    It's MY mountain DiabloScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Mt.Diablo
    Posts
    5,486
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Many years ago, when the Earth and I were young, Bicycling Magazine had useful articles. I want to say this was from ~1984. It's only one way to lace - mirror image, pulling spokes away from derailleur - probably the best and most traditional. I saved this article for a long time and it had grease and Spoke Prep all over it until I finally bought a scanner.



    Other pages and much more HERE
    http://diabloscott.blogspot.com/

  24. #24
    Curmudgeon Wil Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nausea, New Hamster
    My Bikes
    (see http://wildavis.smugmug.com/Bikes) Bianchi Veloce (2005), Nishiki Cascade (1992), Schwinn Super Sport (1983)
    Posts
    1,572
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'll second AKTed's comment about Gerd Schraner's book. It has the most logical set of instructions for lacing (radial (x0), x1, x2, x3, x4) that I've ever seen, and the neatest thing about "The Schraner Way" is that even if interrupted, the builder can easily work out the next step without having to start over; logical, and the easiest way to lace bar none!

    - Wil
    "………………………" - Marcel Marceau

  25. #25
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    DC / Maryland suburbs
    My Bikes
    Homebuilt tourer/commuter, modified-beyond-recognition 1990 Trek 1100, reasonably stock 2002-ish Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo
    Posts
    4,172
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DiabloScott View Post
    Many years ago, when the Earth and I were young, Bicycling Magazine had useful articles. I want to say this was from ~1984.
    Wow! That's truly amazing. I was wondering when and how it turned into a content-free fashion and dieting magazine.

    All I want is bike technology, bike reviews, and ride reviews. I canceled my Bicycling Mag subscription after realizing that there were 5 pages in each issue for me.
    My bikes | Linux and Python stuff | Photo gallery

    Sheldon Brown, I miss you. Thanks for the advice, ideas, humor, and infectious enthusiasm for everything bikes...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •