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  1. #1
    Banned. FXjohn's Avatar
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    What's the best chain tool to buy?

    My old chain tool isn't up to the job of pressing in a new pin on the Shimano 9-speed chains.
    What would be the top of the line tool to get to avoid frustration when doing this job?

  2. #2
    cab horn
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    Don't buy the park chain tools. They suck.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  3. #3
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    Park CT-3

  4. #4
    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattP. View Post

    Park CT-3
    +1

    The choice of pros.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
    Ski, bike and wish I was gay.

  5. #5
    cab horn
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wordbiker View Post
    pros.
    Touche. Should add a qualification of nub in front of that word though. http://www.hozan.co.jp/cycle_e/catal...hain/C-370.htm
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  6. #6
    Elitist Troglodyte DMF's Avatar
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    I really like the feel of this one:



    What about this one?

    Stupidity got us into this mess - why can't it get us out?

    - Will Rogers

  7. #7
    Mr. Dopolina Bob Dopolina's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMF View Post
    I really like the feel of this one:


    Got to admit, the wooden handle is nice.

    I've used the Park CT-3 for years and it has never let me down. make sure you familiarize yourself on how to use the tool to eliminate stiff links. Very handy.

  8. #8
    Agent of Entropy
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    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    Don't buy the park chain tools. They suck.
    uh...what.......

    As usual, NO REAL INFO. i.e.: Why do they suck? Which tools are better? And..........WHY?

    I've never had a prob w/the park tools.....whether doing regular maintenance, rehab/flipping bikes (removing WAY RUSTY chains), or installing pins in brand new chains. I'm sure you have reasons for your opinion. Please elaborate..............thx

  9. #9
    Svr
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    Senior Member Svr's Avatar
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    The Rohloff tool is probably the best available (with a price to match): http://www.rohloff.de/en/products/revolver_2/index.html

    I've never had a problem with my Park CT-3.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    I use the Park one at work. it fine and does the job.

    but, I'd probably get the hozan tool, just to try it out

  11. #11
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    +1

  12. #12
    that bike nut BikingGrad80's Avatar
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    I use the cheap spin doctor one. No complaints. All it does is hold the chain and poke the pin. I also have the nashbar one which looks a bit nicer (the pin is metal not plastic).

  13. #13
    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
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    Considering the only chains sold these days that one would press a pin into are Shimano chains...just about any tool will work as well as another. I don't feel the need to spend $60 on fancy pliers to snap the pin off either. Any tool is only as good as the operator.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
    Ski, bike and wish I was gay.

  14. #14
    Elitist Troglodyte DMF's Avatar
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    Anyone used Rohloff's sprocket wear gauge?

    Or have a technique that works without the tool?
    Stupidity got us into this mess - why can't it get us out?

    - Will Rogers

  15. #15
    Haunted Halloween's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FXjohn View Post
    My old chain tool isn't up to the job of pressing in a new pin on the Shimano 9-speed chains.
    What would be the top of the line tool to get to avoid frustration when doing this job?
    Well, this company called Shimano makes tools for bike parts... they make parts for bikes, too.


    TL-CN23 Chain Connecting Tool for IG/HG/UG Chain.
    8/9/10-speed chain compatible.

    or


    TL-CN32 Professional Chain Connecting Tool for IG/HG/UG Chain.
    2 spare pins included in grip. Compatible with 8/9/10-speed chains.


    Don't know whether they're any good... probably about as good as the chains they're made for...

  16. #16
    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMF View Post
    Anyone used Rohloff's sprocket wear gauge?

    Or have a technique that works without the tool?
    I have the Rohloff tool, but the main purpose is not to tell if a cassette is worn out or not. It is for showing a customer that their cassette is worn out.

    Again, your eyes and experience are the best tools.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
    Ski, bike and wish I was gay.

  17. #17
    Elitist Troglodyte DMF's Avatar
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    I can tell an obviously worn cassette via Mk. I Eyeball, but some that skip just don't look bad to me.

    The procedure for measuring wear appears to be adaptable to a similar rig using a piece of new chain. Seems to me that the key piece of this tool is the fulcrum, not the chain.

    Still, $24 isn't a lot if the tool is useful.
    Stupidity got us into this mess - why can't it get us out?

    - Will Rogers

  18. #18
    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
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    Yes DMF, I have found the tool useful, especially for the aforementioned reason. I also like it as a demonstration tool for the lesser experienced mechanics in the shop that may have a tougher time both with judging the wear of cogs and/or convincing a customer that the time for replacement is due.

    My point was that there are many tools that try to compensate for lack of experience of the user. Chain checkers, wear indicators, clutches on screwguns, third and fourth hand tools, fancy chain presses...all attempts at making mechanical work less dependent on skills and capable of being performed/diagnosed by any experience level, and almost all can be performed with "lesser" and simpler tools + skill (such as the Mk. I Eyeball ). For a commercial shop with varying degrees of experience, the tools can easily be justified...less so for a home mechanic (due to cost), or a pro on the road with limited tool storage space and weight restrictions.

    Given all that, I still use the Rohloff checker on occasion to save some time, but I am not utterly dependent upon it, as I doubt you would be. Ironically, the shop never previously used the HG/IG checker, nor even knew they existed until I ordered one for myself.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
    Ski, bike and wish I was gay.

  19. #19
    Senior Member jazzy_cyclist's Avatar
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    I have both the Park and the Shimano tool as the Park (I forget which model) is really made for 9-speeds, and the Shimano tool I got specifically for 10 speeds. This probably wasn't totally necessary. They both work fine - after all there's not a whole lot to them.

  20. #20
    Senior Member z415's Avatar
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    That Park CT-3 is heavy, expensive, but you can rest assured knowing it will work forever.
    Falling is learning...[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]...learn to not fall in a box.
    Any good American will watch THIS -and- WHERE WAS MY BIKE MADE?

  21. #21
    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by z415 View Post
    That Park CT-3 is heavy, expensive, but you can rest assured knowing it will work forever.
    Yup, mine is 10 years old and I've never even needed a replacement pin.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
    Ski, bike and wish I was gay.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Otter 718's Avatar
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    I have a 20-year old chain tool from my Dad's toolbox; No idea of the brand, but it works just fine. The important thing, I think, is that it's small and light enough to keep with me for the commute. I have used it on the road, not on my own bike, but to help out some poor guy with a a broken chain and a long way home. You never know when you might need it.

  23. #23
    Luggite bsyptak's Avatar
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    The Spin Doctor one and the one on the Alien multitool work perfectly. Of course, I only use them to push the pin out. Then, I use a SRAM powerlink to reconnect my Shimano chains. Replacement chains have usually been the SRAM chains. 10 Speed replacement chains will be KMC from Performance (house branded Forte) because they also still use a reusable link, they're cheap, and light. Why SRAM ever decided to dispense of the reusable link in favor of a 1-time use link is about as dumb as New Coke. Especially when KMC and Wipperman still do them.

    The powerlink will keep you from having to purchase another chain tool. $3.99


  24. #24
    Campy NR / SR forever cadillacmike68's Avatar
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    I use an ancient Cyclo chain tool. It works great. I bought another one recently, but the old one is still going strong. I'm using old Sedis chains (for her bike) and Regina Oros for mine, so the old Cyclo is just fine. My old LBS owner friend up in Worcester once told me that the best tool (back then) was actually the cheapest as well - the Cyclo. He was right.
    1978 Raleigh Pro - bought new - me
    1987 Shogun 400 - bought new - her

  25. #25
    Senior Member Ziemas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Svr View Post
    The Rohloff tool is probably the best available (with a price to match): http://www.rohloff.de/en/products/revolver_2/index.html

    I've never had a problem with my Park CT-3.
    Yes, Rohloff makes the best. They are wonderful.

    What I would suggest to you John is to get a decent (read not Rohloff) chain tool and use either SRAM chains with quick links (no tools are required to disassemble the chain for cleaning) or just a SRAM link with a Shimano chain if you so desire. You'll only have to break the chain once in it's life (when fitting it), and assembly and disassembly is a snap with the link.

    EDIT: The above assumes you are still riding a 9 speed setup. If you've gone to 10 speed go for a Connex or KMC chain or link.

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