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  1. #1
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    Spokes loosening

    I just finished re-spoking a 36 spoke Mavic rim with DT spokes. Followed Sheldon Brown's instructions, and got very uniform tension (according to the tone). Less than 100 miles later 4 spokes (3 on left and 1 on right) have unthreaded and become so loose they can be shaken1/2 inch! Never had this happen before. Any suggestions?

    Dave

  2. #2
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
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    Woahhh... that's pretty crazy.

    Here are a few random ideas:
    • Did you follow SB's recommendation NOT to grease the left-side spokes, since they're under fairly low tension?
    • Did you use the right length spokes?
    • Was the initial tension level sufficient? If you've never built a wheel before, and didn't use a tensiometer, you may underestimate the appropriate tension level.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    I'd vote insufficient tension. Sufficient tension is analgous to the installation torque of a bolt. The tension helps keep the nipple/spoke loosening from vibration and fluctuating loads.

    I've oiled all spoke threads during wheel builds without any unwanted loosening.

  4. #4
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MudPie View Post
    I'd vote insufficient tension. Sufficient tension is analgous to the installation torque of a bolt. The tension helps keep the nipple/spoke loosening from vibration and fluctuating loads.
    +1, this is certainly the most likely cause I would imagine.

    Quote Originally Posted by MudPie View Post
    I've oiled all spoke threads during wheel builds without any unwanted loosening.
    I regularly do this as well, but I have heard of others having problems.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member z415's Avatar
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    Too much grease doesn't really do much except make future truing easier and collect dirt. I throw my nipples in a tub of grease and dipped the spoke threads in the grease when I build my wheels and I've never had problems.
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    Senior Member Deanster04's Avatar
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    No matter what you read "Tone" as a spoke tensioning "device" isn't reliable. I built wheels for years by tone and my wheels with the Park tensionometer are far superior. Even "uber builders" like Gerd Schraner will tell you the same.
    Get the tool and build the wheels at the upper end of the recommended tension range and you should eliminate the loose spokes.

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