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Old 09-06-07, 06:01 PM   #1
Jed19 
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Grease or Not

Should one grease a new freehub body before installing a new cassette on it or not?

Thanks for all responses.
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Old 09-06-07, 06:03 PM   #2
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No need to grease the external surfaces of the freehub body. The mating surface between the freehub body and cassette does not need to be lubricated.
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Old 09-06-07, 06:09 PM   #3
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Thanks MudPie.
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Old 09-06-07, 06:41 PM   #4
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Hey LUCAS. MudPie is technically correct. The interface of freehub/cassette is not a high friction-wear area, nor is it typically a removal problem. However, if you are assembling a new rear end, I think it's a good idea to put a THIN coating of grease on all mating surfaces. Especially if you expect the bike to be exposed to water regularly, or if you live in a coastal area (salty air). My reasoning is not related to probs w/disassembly, but rather with corrosion protection on parts that are not regularly accessed for servicing. I hate surface rust on steel and oxidation on alloy parts, but then I also live right between the Atlantic Ocean and the Delaware River.

BTW...when I say THIN coating, I basically mean to smear some grease into an old rag and wipe the parts down with it, just to "wet" the surface with the grease. It's just a preventive precaution I take when assembling parts I don't expect to take apart regularly. You can use whatever lube you feel is good for corrosion protection, but I have found good 'ol wheel bearing grease to be pretty effective (and cheap).
I have an old "grease rag" in a plastic bag just for doing this when assembling stuff.

Whatever you do, good luck...............
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Old 09-06-07, 06:48 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freeradical View Post
Hey LUCAS. MudPie is technically correct. The interface of freehub/cassette is not a high friction-wear area, nor is it typically a removal problem. However, if you are assembling a new rear end, I think it's a good idea to put a THIN coating of grease on all mating surfaces. Especially if you expect the bike to be exposed to water regularly, or if you live in a coastal area (salty air). My reasoning is not related to probs w/disassembly, but rather with corrosion protection on parts that are not regularly accessed for servicing. I hate surface rust on steel and oxidation on alloy parts, but then I also live right between the Atlantic Ocean and the Delaware River.

BTW...when I say THIN coating, I basically mean to smear some grease into an old rag and wipe the parts down with it, just to "wet" the surface with the grease. It's just a preventive precaution I take when assembling parts I don't expect to take apart regularly. You can use whatever lube you feel is good for corrosion protection, but I have found good 'ol wheel bearing grease to be pretty effective (and cheap).
I have an old "grease rag" in a plastic bag just for doing this when assembling stuff.

Whatever you do, good luck...............
Thanks freeradical. I greased the lockring, and I think I am good to go.

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