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  1. #1
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    Patch a 700x23-25 tube?

    The actual tire is a 27x1, but it uses the thin (1") 700 tube. I recently had a flat, and all attempts to patch the tube were useless - rubber seems to be too thin to hold the large, thick patches in the repair kit I had. Also, trying to reinstall with steel tire irons was a big mistake - did more damage to the tube when I put the tire on. I finally gave up after about three attempts (and patches), bought a new tube and plastic tire "irons", and VERY CAREFULLY installed the new tube and old tire. Success at last, but a question going forward - are these tubes essentially "one use" (discard when flat), or can they be patched? What has been anyone else's experience?

  2. #2
    Call me The Breeze I_bRAD's Avatar
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    I patch 700x23 tubes all the time. I use Rena patches if it matters. Best to patch ahead of time and let it dry for a day or so before you use them.

  3. #3
    * vpiuva's Avatar
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    I cut the patches into smaller sizes if they're too large. And I do think these small thin tubes are harder to patch. My repairs tend to leak if I don't let them dry a while.

    A little OT, but kevlar bead/folding tires can often be installed with 2 strong thumbs and no tire irons. Another reason to buy them over wire bead.

  4. #4
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    They are easy to patch if you use the right patches and glue. Rema patches are the world's standard and available in patch kits from any LBS or in boxes of 100 (share them) from Bike Tools Etc. or The Third Hand.

    The glue that comes with the patch kits is good but the small tubes dry out almost as soon as they are opened. I use Elmer's Rubber Cement that I get in 4-oz bottles at any office supply or X-mart. When it's reasonably fresh it works every bit as well as the kit tubes and can be used for all sorts of things around the house too.

    Be sure to scuff the area around the puncture with the sandpaper included in the kits to remove the molding compound or any loose dirt.

    BTW, most tires can be reinstalled with thumb pressure only and that guarantees the tube isn't damaged. Try it that way first and use the "tire irons" only as a last resort.

  5. #5
    A little North of Hell
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    Rema

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    XXXI

  6. #6
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Since the patch adheres to the surface of the tube, the thickness of the tube wall is not a factor. More likey, you either did not prepare the surface adequately using the small piece of sandpaper supplied with the kit or you got in a hurry and did not allow time for the glue to dry on the tube before applying the patch.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by supcom View Post
    Since the patch adheres to the surface of the tube, the thickness of the tube wall is not a factor.
    When I read the OP that was my first thought also, but I believe he meant "too narrow".

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by vpiuva View Post
    I cut the patches into smaller sizes if they're too large.
    +1
    Cut them smaller. Carry the smaller sizes if you patch on the road.

  9. #9
    Senior Member RK1963's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by I_bRAD View Post
    I patch 700x23 tubes all the time. I use Rena patches if it matters. Best to patch ahead of time and let it dry for a day or so before you use them.
    +1

  10. #10
    Senior Member Pig_Chaser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by I_bRAD View Post
    I patch 700x23 tubes all the time. I use Rena patches if it matters. Best to patch ahead of time and let it dry for a day or so before you use them.
    +2
    I carry a spare tube, that way you can swap it on the road, and patch the other tube at your leisure.

  11. #11
    Videre non videri
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    Yeah, I had the same problem as the OP. Can't get any patch kits here that have suitable sizes for the patches. They're all made for the majority of bikes here, which typically have 40-50 mm tyres, and tubes to match...

    I just carry spare tubes now.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pig_Chaser View Post
    +2
    I carry a spare tube, that way you can swap it on the road, and patch the other tube at your leisure.
    I do too. One problem is that you often can't locate the puncture in the tube using a frame or mini-pump so you don't even know where to patch it. I carry a spare tube and replace the bad one on the road. Then, I repair the punctured one when I have the right tools and am dry and warm.

  13. #13
    Call me The Breeze I_bRAD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    I do too. One problem is that you often can't locate the puncture in the tube using a frame or mini-pump so you don't even know where to patch it. I carry a spare tube and replace the bad one on the road. Then, I repair the punctured one when I have the right tools and am dry and warm.
    Same here. I have a "good" and "bad" pile of tubes at home. When I have time I go through and patch the salvageable ones and return them to the "good" pile.

    I've got tubes of the vulcanizing fluid that must be 2 years old and are still fine. Why are yours drying out so fast?

  14. #14
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    First you need to shop for patch in an LBS or at least some place that carry a lots of 700cX23 tire. They should have smaller patch that fit 23mm properly.

    The key to proper patching is to let the glue dry, it's counter-intuitive for newb but it work.

    First use the sand-paper on the tube where the hole is.

    Now rubb in a thin layer of glue on your tube the thinner layer the faster it dry.

    Now wait 1-2 min for the glue to appear completely dry, You may blow on it if you feel that it help drying.

    Now remove the aluminum from the patch keep the plastic on the patch.

    Stick it to the tube and press to ensure proper contact of the patch. You can leave the plastic there. Put the tube back on the wheel.

    Now I also carry extra tube and patch my tube at home most of the time but always carry patch kit in case.
    Last edited by DanPT; 10-18-07 at 10:11 PM.

  15. #15
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    One thing I found the other day, for at home repairs, I cleaned the area where the patch goes with lacquer thinner. It was clean and very tacky and did not require the sandpaper..Acetone would probably work as well.
    Bud

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by I_bRAD View Post
    I've got tubes of the vulcanizing fluid that must be 2 years old and are still fine. Why are yours drying out so fast?
    Unopened, those little glue tubes last for years. However, as soon as you use one, it dries out in a few weeks or months as you can't reseal it effectively. So, realistically they are single use items unless you have a LOT of flats.

    Since patch kits usually contain 6 patches, you need another source of glue for patches 2 through 6.

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